DSLR

The 5-in-1 ‘One Backpack’ wants to be your do-it-all bag

Design company ITR Studio has launched a Kickstarter campaign for its The One Backpack, a 5-in-1 modular backpack that can be used as a camera bag, work & gym pack, suit carry backpack, travel pack or tech-backpack, doing away with the need for multiple single-purpose bags.

A magnetic system is used to attach modules to the base pack and adjust for different purposes and loads. Five modules are available to configure the pack: a camera module, a sports module, a sling module, a suit carry module and a pouch module.

The padded camera module is designed to carry a DSLR and two lenses or a DJI Mavic Pro drone with extra battery. The sports module comes with a portable and washable shoe bag. All modular components can be used individually or in combination, depending on your requirements.

The base pack has a capacity of 30 liters and is available on Kickstarter at an early bird price of $140 USD. The individual modules will set you back between $53 USD for the camera module and $85 USD for the suit carry module. For more information, check out the product video below or head over to The One Backpack Kickstarter page.

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From:: DPreview

Powerbase EDGE and Hydracore 100 – Universal Battery Packs From Core SWX

By Jakub Han

Core SWX introduced their new battery packs – presented at NAB 2018: The universal and lightweight Powerbase EDGE and their first NiMH Gold Mount battery pack – the Hydracore 100.

Core SWX, the US company specializing in power solutions for cameras have introduced a couple of new products at this year’s NAB. Among those innovations are the universal Powerbase EDGE battery as well as their first NiMH brick battery pack, the Hydracore 100.

Powerbase EDGE

This interesting battery solution follows the path of its highly successful predecessor, the Powerbase 70, which has been introduced eight years ago. According to Core SWX the new Powerbase is packed with more features while being smaller than the original one.

The capacity of the Lithium-ion Powerbase EDGE is 49Wh (14.8V DC, 3.3Ah) and it is keeping the versatility of offering two mounting options, while being 30% smaller than the Powerbase 70. Mounting is possible via V-Mount for cine cameras such as RED or Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini cameras, as well as the 1/4-20 screw mount for DSLR and mirrorless cameras, such as the Panasonic GH5.

In addition, the Powerbase EDGE has 2 USBs and 2 Power-Taps (one of them being a SmartTap), as well as a runtime LCD for users to see the exact battery expectancy in minutes. It also features a quick release plate for fast detachment from the camera or rig.

Powerbase EDGE Key Specs:

  • Capacity: 49Wh (14.8V DC, 3.3Ah)
  • Size: 5.1” x 3.6” x 1.55” (12.95 x 9.14 x 3.94 cm)
  • Weight: 1.3lbs (0.59kg).
  • Normal Runtime: approx. 8.25 hours (Sony A7 w/o accessories )
  • Max Continuous Load: 8A

Hydracore 100

The Hydracore 100 is the first brick battery pack created by Core SWX that uses NiMH technology. The idea behind this product is to provide an → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Canon shows off its latest CMOS sensor tech in new promo video

Canon isn’t only in the business of making DSLR, mirrorless and point-and-shoot cameras. It’s also in the business of making the CMOS sensors inside those cameras—arguably the most important component. And in order to showcase what its achieved with its latest lineup of CMOS sensors, Canon USA has created a little promotional video.

The video showcases a variety of sensors seen across Canon’s product line, from the extreme low-light full-frame sensor it showed off earlier this year, to more industrialized CMOS sensors made for surveillance and security purposes.

The video description from Canon USA:

This video showcases Canon variety of sensors. For several decades Canon has been developing and manufacturing advanced CMOS sensors with state-of-the-art technologies for exclusive use in Canon products. These sensors are a critical driving force behind many of our successful product lines, ranging from consumer products all the way up to high-end business and industrial solutions.

The video does seem a touch overly dramatic for what it is, and may even come across as a bit cheesy at times (why are they showing new sensor tech inside a Canon EOS 1D that came out in 2001?). Nonetheless, it’s an interesting watch that gives a good overview of the work Canon has been putting into its CMOS sensors in recent years—technology that will hopefully impact the Canon DSLRs and mirrorless cameras of the future.

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From:: DPreview

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig – Now with Room for Accessories

By Graham Sheldon

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig

Joby, maker of a variety of lightweight camera stands and accessories, has created the Joby Gorilla Pod Rig. Available in a smaller and larger capacity version, this rig gives you the ability to mount small accessories such as a light or external mic to its lightweight, flexible and mobile camera stand. Details below:

Reminiscent of one of my favorite UK horror classics, The Wicker Man, the Joby Gorilla Pod Rig is the same Gorilla Pod you know and love with the addition of… arms. Well, arms and cold shoe mounts.

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig

The Joby Gorilla Pod Rig comes in two flavors: a mobile phone version priced at $99 and aimed at mobile phone shooters and a DSLR version priced at $199 that has a load capacity of 11 lbs. Here are a few mounting configurations for the smaller Gorilla Pod Rig Mobile:

V-loggers with bigger DSLR cameras (like a Canon EOS 80D) will find the larger Gorilla Pod Rig is the way to go. It weighs 1.8 lbs without accessories and includes an Arca-type compatible head that rotates 360 degrees and comes with a handy quick release plate. In the past I’ve used Joby Gorilla Pod’s primarily for mounting action cams and I’ve found them study and capable of taking abuse in the field. Made from ABS Plastic, Aluminum, Nylon Webbing, Stainless Steel and TPE, this rig seems well made too.

Obviously a major advantage of the Gorilla Pod system is the ability to mount the rig to trees, railings, bikes and → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig – Now with Room for Accessories

By Graham Sheldon

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig

Joby, maker of a variety of lightweight camera stands and accessories, has created the Joby Gorilla Pod Rig. Available in a smaller and larger capacity version, this rig gives you the ability to mount small accessories such as a light or external mic to its lightweight, flexible and mobile camera stand. Details below:

Reminiscent of one of my favorite UK horror classics, The Wicker Man, the Joby Gorilla Pod Rig is the same Gorilla Pod you know and love with the addition of… arms. Well, arms and cold shoe mounts.

Joby Gorilla Pod Rig

The Joby Gorilla Pod Rig comes in two flavors: a mobile phone version priced at $99 and aimed at mobile phone shooters and a DSLR version priced at $199 that has a load capacity of 11 lbs. Here are a few mounting configurations for the smaller Gorilla Pod Rig Mobile:

V-loggers with bigger DSLR cameras (like a Canon EOS 80D) will find the larger Gorilla Pod Rig is the way to go. It weighs 1.8 lbs without accessories and includes an Arca-type compatible head that rotates 360 degrees and comes with a handy quick release plate. In the past I’ve used Joby Gorilla Pod’s primarily for mounting action cams and I’ve found them study and capable of taking abuse in the field. Made from ABS Plastic, Aluminum, Nylon Webbing, Stainless Steel and TPE, this rig seems well made too.

Obviously a major advantage of the Gorilla Pod system is the ability to mount the rig to trees, railings, bikes and → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Nikon dominates World Press Photo 2018 camera breakdown

Photo by chuttersnap

Last week, the prestigious photojournalism contest World Press Photo announced its 2018 winning photos, and most of those winners included information about the gear used to capture their images. Taking advantage of this fact, Spanish photography website Photolari pulled that public data and created a series of graphs breaking down the equipment used by participating photojournalists.

Of the 129 winning images, 97 included gear details; though the graphs don’t represent the models were used by all participants, they do cover the majority. And the short version of the results goes something like this: Nikon dominated the brands, and the DSLR continues to dominate over mirrorless.

According to the breakdown, the Nikon D5, Nikon D810, and Canon EOS 5D Mark III tied for first place, with 11 winning photos each. Coming in second is the Nikon D800E and Canon EOS 5D Mark IV with seven units each. Finally, both the Nikon D4S and Nikon D700 tied for third place with six units each.

Nikon is the overall winner among gear use, representing a total of 51.5% versus Canon’s second place 29.9%. Other makers represented far smaller pieces of the pie, with Fujifilm taking 6.2%, Sony taking 5.1%, and both Pentax and DJI taking 2.1% each. Not represented in the percentage graph are three Leica models, two of them the M10 and the other a Leica SL.

Further revealing the type of gear used is another category: types of cameras. That breakdown reveals DSLRs comprised the majority of participants’ gear at 83.5%, with mirrorless taking second place at 11.3%, and other unspecified types representing a total of 5.2%.

This isn’t Photolari’s first breakdown of World Press Photo winner gear. Last year, the site → continue…

From:: DPreview

Manfrotto Releases Cinematic Family of Bags

By Graham Sheldon

Manfrotto has released two new bags aimed at Canon C300 and Sony FS5 style camera users and one primarily for gimbal shooters. Both bags are part of the new “Cinematic” line. Details below:

Manfrotto Cinematic Backpack Expand

The Cinematic Backpack Expand comes equipped with your favorite features from previous Manfrotto bags (ie. rain covers), but with the addition of an expandable pouch mean’t to accommodate the top handle of the Canon C300 MK II. One of the challenges with the Canon Cinema EOS line of cameras in particular is the height of the camera when sitting on a table. It just doesn’t have a longer ENG-style form factor that makes it easier to set in a backpack or camera run bag.

True to the name, the Expand Backpack from Manfrotto has an expandable padded pouch that allows the top handle of the Cinema EOS line ample room for sitting directly in the bag. It seems like a small change, but in practice you won’t need to break down your camera for travel quite as much, which leads to… more shots!

Manfrotto Cinematic Backpack Balance

With the Cinematic Backpack Balance, you’ll find a bag more suitable for your Sony A7R III (or similar sized DSLR) and a DJI Ronin M style gimbal. A side pouch allows the full top handle of the Ronin M room to fit inside the bag. Again, saving time and allowing the gimbal to be packed in a configuration closer to its final shooting arrangement.

While an easy fit with the DJI Ronin M, you’ll find other gimbals in the same size and weight category will fit in this bag as well.

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From:: Cinema 5d

Dpreview wild speculation: could Nikon adopt Sony’s E-mount? :)

By SonyAlpha Admin

Dpreview posted a new article summing up what they learned from the interview with all company managers at CP+. For them it’s clear that: The reign of the DSLR is almost over…Full-frame mirrorless will become the norm, and it will happen pretty soon Yes, I think that statement is 100% correct. But the big question […]

The post Dpreview wild speculation: could Nikon adopt Sony’s E-mount? 🙂 appeared first on sonyalpharumors.

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From:: Sony Alpha Rumors

Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750

For the past few years, I’ve been recommending the Nikon D750 to enthusiasts and semi-professionals needing a reliable DSLR to grow in to – probably more than any other ILC on the market. It was even my Gear of the Year in 2015 for its excellent feature set to price ratio.

Though it debuted in late 2014, the D750 remains a relevant and reliable workhorse years later. 24MP of resolution on a full frame sensor is a sweet spot for a lot of shooters, and the D750 still offers competitive dynamic range and excellent high ISO performance. It also has terrific autofocus, with Nikon’s reliable 3D Tracking.

The D750 has proven to be among the most future-proof full frame DSLRs in recent memory

And as far as full frame DSLRs go, it’s among the lightest ever made. But it’s also a camera we know will likely stand the test of time thanks to aggressive weather-sealing and sturdy construction. In short, the D750 has proven to be among the most future-proof full frame DSLRs in recent memory. Even today it’s still priced aggressively enough – with technology that is relevant – to warrant my recommendation, not to mention the recommendation of the DPReview staff in our Best Camera Under $2000 roundup.

Time for a new recommendation?

I swapped out my Nikon D750 to shoot a show with the Sony a7 III: the combination of excellent AF coverage and good low light IQ left me questioning whether it’s time to recommend this Sony over the Nikon I’ve come to love.
ISO 12800 | 1/400 sec | F4 | Shot on Sony FE 35mm F1.4 ZA | Edited to taste in ACR

But → continue…

From:: DPreview

A Shake-up Coming to the APS-C DSLR Lineup? [CR2]

By Canon Rumors It doesn’t appear that 2018 is going to bring us any interesting new DSLRs, we’re still being told that there won’t be another DSLR of significance released in 2018 (An announcement is always possible). We’re also being told that the APS-C lineup is going to see some kind of a “shake-up” in regards to any … → continue…

From:: Canon Rumors

Video: $7000 superzoom lens + DSLR compared to $35 smartphone lens

NYC-based filmmaker Casey Neistat recently compared a $35 clip-on smartphone lens with a $7,000 DSLR (the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II to be precise) and superzoom lens. The results, to no one’s surprise, were not in the smartphone lens’ favor. However, Neistat expresses surprise at the (admittedly very minor) capabilities of the cheap lens, saying, “So, I very gently, very reluctantly, recommend this total piece of sh*t $35 lens because it sort of almost works.”

That recommendation is given to potential buyers who need something to use with a smartphone. If a more capable lens and camera are within budget, the resulting content will benefit greatly from them, as the comparison screenshot below pretty clearly demonstrates:

Via: PetaPixel

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From:: DPreview

NAB 2018 | Beachtek Audio Adapter Kit for Cellphone Cinema and DSLR Filmmaking at StudentFilmmakers Magazine and HD Pro Guide Magazine Booth #C8943

By Posted by Jody Michelle Solis, Editor

One of my favorite audio kits is the Beachtek system for cellphone cinema and DSLR filmmaking. Check out these photos taken at the StudentFilmmakers Magazine and HD Pro Guide Magazine Booth #C8943, 2018 NAB Show, Las Vegas, NV. Learn more about Beachtek audio solutions at www.beachtek.com.

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From:: Student Filmmakers

MindShift’s new ‘Exposure’ messenger bags are built to handle Mother Nature’s worst

MindShift Gear, the sister company of ThinkTank Photo, has released its all new Exposure messenger bag lineup. Like its backpacks, the MindShift Exposure lineup is made with outdoor photographers in mind, complete with water-repellent material and a rugged bottom.

The Exposure shoulder bags come in two versions: the Exposure 13 and the Exposure 15. As the names suggest, the Exposure 13 can fit a 13-inch laptop, as well as one ungripped DSLR with a 24–70mm F2.8 attached and 2–3 extra lenses depending on your setup. Moving up, the Exposure 15 can fit a 15-inch laptop, as well as one ungripped DSLR with a 70–200mm F2.8 lens attached and 2–5 extra lenses depending on the glass you’re packing. Both bags can also hold up to a 10-inch tablet inside a zippered pocket.

As for looks, the bags are available in two color schemes: Black and Solar Flare, the latter of which is essentially gunmetal grey with orange accents.

Here’s a closer look:

Looks and capacity aren’t the Exposure lineup’s selling point though; these bags were purpose built to handle inclement weather.

The Exposure 13 and 15 were constructed out of durable water-repellant (DWR) fabric and lined with a polyurethane coating, with integrated waterproof sailcloth panels for increased protection from the elements. And for those times when you need to set the bag down, MindShift has constructed the bottom of the bag with Tarpaulin, a strong waterproof fabric that shouldn’t have a problem keeping your gear dry. Finally, if the weather gets even more demanding, there’s also an included rain cover.

The Exposure 13 and 15 messenger bags are available now for $160 and $170, respectively. To learn more, visit the MindShift Gear website.

Press Release

MindShift Gear’s “Exposure” Shoulder Bags Offer the Ultimate in Durability and Weather Protection → continue…

From:: DPreview

Sony FS5 II, Canon C700 FF, Pocket Cam 4K, Fuji X-H1 + More From Day 1 At NAB

By Noam Kroll

I just got back from an exhausting day on the floor at NAB, but wanted to share some quick thoughts and first impressions while everything is still fresh. I’ll be rolling out more NAB content throughout the week, delving into a lot more detail on all the big news and announcements, but for now here are some first impressions –

Let’s start with Blackmagic’s announcement of the Pocket Camera 4K, which undeniably made the biggest splash when it was unveiled earlier today. This was no surprise, as filmmakers have been clamoring for an update to the original Pocket Camera for years, and today that wish came true.

The new Pocket Camera not only shoots 4K, but has a larger sensor (Four Thirds), an MFT mount, Mini-XLR input, CFast/SD slots + the ability to record externally via USB-C to hard drives, dual ISO settings for incredible low-light performance, a 5″ touchscreen monitor, and much more. It’s also a much larger camera, resembling a DSLR more than the previous Pocket Camera.

I think the body style of the camera is actually ideal, as many Pocket Camera shooters are working on guerrilla productions, and the DSLR-style form factor when paired with stills lenses will likely help filmmakers fly under the radar when shooting in public. For $1295, it looks like this camera will be a steal.

Another announcement that caught my attention was the FS5 II from Sony, priced at $4750. The new version mainly brings incremental changes to the camera, and if it weren’t for one specific feature update I probably wouldn’t be highlighting it here today… But Sony revealed they have integrated the color science from their high end Venice cinema camera into the new → continue…

From:: Noam Kroll

Atomos unveils the Ninja V: A 5.2-inch 4K/60p external monitor and recorder

For filmmakers who want an Atomos external monitor/recorder but feel like the 7-inch Atomos Ninja and Shogun recorders are a bit too big, Atomos has released something just for you. The Atomos Ninja V packs many of the same features into a smaller 5.2-inch form factor that the company says is “perfect for mirrorless cameras, DSLRs and gaming.”

We’re not sure about (and not interested in) the gaming bit, but for video shooters who prefer a DSLR or mirrorless system, a smaller external recorder could be exactly what they’ve been waiting for.

The Ninja V sports a 5.2-inch HDR screen with 1000nits brightness and anti-reflection finish for easy daylight recording, and can record up to 4K/60p 10-bit video over HDMI 2 in either Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR. And since portability is one of its main features, the whole thing is 1-inch (2.5cm) thick and weighs just 11oz (320g).

Feature-wise, you get most of the things you’ve come to expect from an Atomos recorder: histogram, false color, focus peaking, movable 1-1 and 2-1 pixel magnification, waveform, RGB parade, Vector scope, 8 channel audio level meters, and the ability to load creative LUTs, for a start. And the Atom HDR engine promises to show you 10+ stops of dynamic range on the LCD in real time from your camera’s Log/PQ/HLG signals.

Finally, the Atomos Ninja V also features the company’s modular expansion slot, which will allow you to dock “expansion modules” into the battery slot and add advanced features like bi-directional high speed video, audio and continuous power.

The Atomos Ninja V is available now for $695. To learn more about the new monitor/recorder, check out the full press release below or head over to the Atomos → continue…

From:: DPreview