Video

ULTIMATE 85mm Shootout! – Canon RF 85 F1.2L vs Canon 85 1.4L IS vs Canon 85 1.2L vs Sigma 85 1.4 ART

The great 85mm Lens shootout! Last year we did this video with the Canon 85 f1.4L IS, the Sigma 85 Art and the Canon 85 1.2L. This time we add in the newest lens from canon the 85mm RF f1.2L. This is supposed to be the best 85mm lens optically coming from canon but how much better is it? In this video, ill go though some side by sides with all of the lenses and see how the new kid stacks up.

Original 85mm Comparison: http://bit.ly/2AXTAJF

35mm Comparison: Coming soon!

50mm Comparison: Coming soon!

Try out any of the lenses

Canon RF 85mm F1.2: http://bit.ly/30BwTGT

Canon EF 85 F1.4L IS: http://bit.ly/2yMLyBz

Canon EF 85 F1.2L: http://bit.ly/2yN99lJ

Sigma EF 85mm F1.4 ART: http://bit.ly/2yOEmFd

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Outro music from ArtList IO – http://bit.ly/GregArtlistio – Get 2 months FREE!

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Citizen Kane & Apocalypse Now || Geoff Boyle || Deconstructing Cinematography

Citizen Kane & Apocalypse Now || Geoff Boyle || Deconstructing Cinematography

In this weeks episode Geoff Boyle deconstructions some of the shots from both Citizen Kane and Apocalypse Now. What makes these films so successful?


Cooke Optics TV
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Thank you to the British Society of Cinematographers (BSC). http://www.bscine.com/

Filmed with a Sony FS5 and Cooke Mini S4/i Lenses.
Produced by ImageNova. http://www.imagenova.co.uk.
Email cathy@cookeoptics.com for enquires or leave a comment!

The Mask – What’s the Difference?

The Mask - What's the Difference?

The Mask turns 25 this month AND the comics are coming back! So it’s time to look back at Jim Carrey’s half cartoon turn as the big green head. Based on a shockingly violent graphic novel, how did The Mask go from a splatter fest to slapstick? It’s time to ask What’s the Difference!?

Cinematic Lighting Using Windows

Stay tuned to the end for a chance to win a prize!

Commercial and corporate projects are some of the most common gigs you will work on as a professional filmmaker. Knowing how to make the best out of any situation will allow your work to stand out and help portray your client in the best way possible. Today, director of photography Dave Cortez teaches us two different ways to light high key commercial setups, with an emphasis on how to use light from windows in your frame.

In this video, Dave shows us two different methods for shooting high key commercial setups.
In our first setup, he creates separation between the foreground background using haze and leading lines. He also wraps the light from the window around the face to create lighting continuity. In our second setup, he shoots an over the shoulder than can be used in a commercial or narrative setting. In this setup, he exposed for the windows and added light to motivate light from the window.

The main techniques that we will be discussing today are wrapping light with soft sources, adding light to balance the window light, and blooming windows. Wrapping light with soft sources refers to the technique of using large lighting sources to get a soft wrap of light around the subject, to mimic what the light from the window is doing. You want to make a light source that is as close to the window shape as you can. Adding light to balance the window light means that the more light is coming from the windows, the more light you need to add. This way, the lighting levels will be equal outside and inside of the windows. Blooming windows is a technique for making blown-out windows look more pleasing. By added haze, you can get a nice glow from the window, instead of a harsh overexposed frame.

At the end of the day, your lighting should be based on what tells the story best! For commercials and corporate videos, that can often mean making the people or products of screen look their best. But when you have an unexpected element to your location, such as a bright window, you need to know how to handle that. This video will help you feel a little more comfortable in those types of situations. That way you can focus more on the story you’re telling with the video.

Connect with Dave: https://www.instagram.com/davecortez/
Connect with Callie: https://www.instagram.com/calliepunchard/
Connect with Ajala: https://www.instagram.com/ajalabandele/
Connect with Valentina: https://www.twitter.com/valentinavee
Connect with Chetco: https://www.instagram.com/thechetco/

Want more free lighting and cinematography tutorials? Subscribe to us so you never miss an episode: https://goo.gl/QwazdM

🎥How to Light the Cinematic Film Look!

🎥Free Cinematography Lessons From Experts!
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

🎥Subscribe to Aputure:
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Summary:
Aputure’s YouTube channel provides free high-quality cinematography, lighting, and filmmaking educational content to help you take your film projects to the next level.

Talking Cinematography: Nic Sadler

In this episode of “ZEISS presents: Talking Cinematography” cinematographer Nic Sadler talks about about choices and how to make them. What needs to be considered when choosing lenses or how to frame a shot? DOP Nic Sadler has the answers.

More info: www.zeiss.com/cine
Our blog: https://lenspire.zeiss.com/cine

ULTRA Wide MACRO with Zero Distortion!? – Laowa 15mm F2

Laowa is back at it with another super cool lens. This is the 15mm f2 with zero distortion! For a bonus on top it only weighs 1lbs and is a macro lens!

Try this lens out: http://bit.ly/2LfmFZp

Check out the Laowa 24mm Probe Lens: https://youtu.be/s4UEl8gTcbc

Music licensed from Musicbed. Get a 30-day free trial for the best music for your videos: https://mscbd.fm/lptgm

Outro music from ArtList IO – http://bit.ly/GregArtlistio – Get 2 months FREE!

IG: @lensprotogo
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My IG @gregfarnum

Using colour in cinematography || Seamus McGarvey || Masterclass

Using colour in cinematography || Seamus McGarvey || Masterclass

In this episode Seamus talks to us about the use of colour in his films. He tells us about what characteristics some colours can have and how they can be used to create emotion or define a character.


Cooke Optics TV
www.cookeoptics.tv

Website http://www.cookeoptics.com
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Twitter http://www.twitter.com/cooke_optics
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Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/2831810/

Thank you to the British Society of Cinematographers (BSC). http://www.bscine.com/

Filmed with a Sony FS5 and Cooke Mini S4/i Lenses.
Produced by ImageNova. http://www.imagenova.co.uk.
Email cathy@cookeoptics.com for enquires or leave a comment!

3 Best Lighting Setups for Music Videos

Stay tuned to the end for a chance to win a prize!

Music videos are one of the most common things you will shoot starting out as a cinematographer. Every video is different, and learning about the different styles of music videos – and how to shoot them – will assist you in telling the story of each performer, especially through your lighting choices. Today, Director of Photography Andrew Kowalski teaches us three different ways to shoot dramatic music videos, using textural lighting and framing.

In this video, Andrew shows us three different methods for shooting dramatic music videos.
In our first setup, he uses lighting to accentuate the location and separate the talent from the background, without over-lighting them. In our second setup, he recreates a typical band performance shot, using a soft key-light to fill the space. In the third and last setup, he uses deep space coupled with black and white to create a stylized shot, with a lot of texture.

The main techniques that we will be discussing today are shooting wide, using the song to motivate the lighting, and being creative with where your light is coming from. Shooting wide means that you see more of the location in your frame. Most music video coverage is tight shots straight onto the talent. Here, Andrew plays with wides and profile shots to create variation. Using the song to motivate the lighting means that the mood of the lighting reflects the mood of the song. For example, if the song is slow and dramatic, the lighting should be dark and soft. Being creative with where light is coming from refers to the notion that music videos don’t have to justify light sources emitting from any natural source. You don’t always have to use light that appears as if it comes from a window or a lamp; you can have your light be whatever you want.

Ultimately, many filmmakers will find themselves shooting music videos at some point in their career. Depending on who the artist is and what they have in mind, music videos can come in all shapes and sizes. Being able to identify the style of shooting that each video requires will help you to create better work and accurately portray the emotion of the music. Music videos are still a great way to tell stories, so keep lighting in mind when planning your next shoot.

Connect with Andrew: https://www.instagram.com/kowalskiimaging/
Connect with Aaron: https://www.instagram.com/aaronmveach/
Connect with Shelby: https://www.instagram.com/creepazoid36/
Connect with Valentina: https://www.twitter.com/valentinavee/
Connect with Chetco: https://www.instagram.com/thechetco/

Want more free lighting and cinematography tutorials? Subscribe to us so you never miss an episode: https://goo.gl/QwazdM

🎥How to Light the Cinematic Film Look!

🎥Free Cinematography Lessons From Experts!
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

🎥Subscribe to Aputure:
https://www.youtube.com/aputurephoto
https://www.facebook.com/aputure
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🎥Connect with the A-Team!
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Summary:
Aputure’s YouTube channel provides free high-quality cinematography, lighting, and filmmaking educational content to help you take your film projects to the next level.

How to Shoot Flat Lay Photos

This video covers the basics for shooting Flat Lay Photos. Everything from Lighting, Backgrounds, Gear, settings and some different style for you to try out!

Want to take it to the next level check out these ways to make your flat lay stand out: Coming Soon!

Kellyn’s IG: @kellynboyden

Canon EOS R: http://bit.ly/2D1gwMj

Canon 50mm RF: http://bit.ly/2FB8Hz4

Fiilex Matrix: http://bit.ly/2CNCz9M

600EX II – RT Flash: http://bit.ly/2NyNauA

Music licensed from Musicbed. Get a 30-day free trial for the best music for your videos: https://mscbd.fm/lptgm

Outro music from ArtList IO – http://bit.ly/GregArtlistio – Get 2 months FREE!

IG: @lensprotogo
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My IG @gregfarnum

Character Introductions: Action/Adventure | Advanced Cinematography Techniques

Stay tuned to the end for a chance to win a prize!

Character introductions are one of the fundamental skills needed in storytelling. Every story is made up of characters, and how you choose to introduce them in your films can say a lot about who they are. Putting thought into how the characters are portrayed in their introductions will shape how the audience sees them for the rest of the film. Today, director of photography Andrew Kowalski teaches us three different ways to introduce your action / adventure character, using creative techniques from your favorite franchises.

In this video, Andrew shows us three different methods for introducing your character.
In our first setup, he uses a shadow of the character projected on a wall to show their recognizable shape without actually seeing them. In our second setup, he shows a character walk into focus similar to something you would see in a spy movie. In the third and last setup, he creates a generic hero reveal shot as the character comes storming through a door.

The main techniques that we will be discussing today are projecting shadows, silhouette lighting, and dynamic motion. Projecting shadows is when you place a point source light behind someone so that they make a shadow against a wall. The closer you bring the light to the subject, the larger the shadow will be. Silhouette lighting is when you have a strong backlight on a subject and no key or fill light. This will cause you to only see the black shape of the subject, without any detail on their body. Dynamic motions is when there is camera movement paired with a subject’s movement. In this case the character runs towards the camera while the camera moves forward towards the subject, creating heightened intensity.

At the end of the day, making stories is all about characters. How we show our characters will allow us to tell a lot about them without using any words. The first time we see them, or the moment we see them after a long absence, tells so much about the character and their place in the scene. Knowing how to be intentional about using light to tell something about your character will make your stories more impactful. Every character is different, but thinking about how you want your audience to see the character will greatly improve your storytelling ability.

Connect with Andrew: https://www.instagram.com/kowalskiimaging/
Connect with Aaron: https://www.instagram.com/aaronmveach/
Connect with Shelby: https://www.instagram.com/creepazoid36/
Connect with Valentina: https://www.twitter.com/valentinavee/
Connect with Chetco: https://www.instagram.com/thechetco/

Want more free lighting and cinematography tutorials? Subscribe to us so you never miss an episode: https://goo.gl/QwazdM

🎥How to Light the Cinematic Film Look!

🎥Free Cinematography Lessons From Experts!
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

🎥Subscribe to Aputure:
https://www.youtube.com/aputurephoto
https://www.facebook.com/aputure
https://www.instagram.com/aputuretech

🎥Connect with the A-Team!
Ted – https://instagram.com/aputure_ted
Benny – https://instagram.com/aputure_benny

🎥GET APUTURE GEAR:
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🎥MUSIC:
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Summary:
Aputure’s YouTube channel provides free high-quality cinematography, lighting, and filmmaking educational content to help you take your film projects to the next level.

Talking Cinematography: Denis Lenoir AFC, ASC, ASK

In this episode of “ZEISS presents: Talking Cinematography” cinematographer Denis Lenoir, AFC, ASC, AFK talks about the steady knowledge transfer between him, the director and his crew and why it’s vital for every career in filmmaking, and about his favorite lenses.

More info: www.zeiss.com/cine
Our blog: https://lenspire.zeiss.com/cine

The cinematography of The Empire Strikes Back || Peter Suschitsky || Case Study

The cinematography of The Empire Strikes Back || Peter Suschitsky || Case Study

In this episode Peter Suschitsky talks to us about his work on The Empire Strikes Back. Peter explains how he lit Darth Vader. He tells us how he used smoke to hid the fact the set had no background.


Cooke Optics TV
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Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/2831810/

Thank you to the British Society of Cinematographers (BSC). http://www.bscine.com/

Filmed with a Sony FS5 and Cooke Mini S4/i Lenses.
Produced by ImageNova. http://www.imagenova.co.uk.
Email cathy@cookeoptics.com for enquires or leave a comment!

3 Reasons why EVERY Filmmaker NEEDS a 360 camera! – Insta360 One X

I have been playing around with the insta360 One X for a few weeks now and I wanted to find a way to integrate it into my workflow for productions and these are three reasons why I think every filmmaker needs to get one.

Try one of these cameras out: http://bit.ly/2xdpWz9
Ready to pick one up? : http://bit.ly/2xd2qSZ

#1. Location Scouting: 0:55

#2. Continuity, Art, Lighting: 3:09

#3. Behind the scenes: 4:13

The full process from start to finish: 7:14

Thanks to all the guys who sent in some BTS footage, go give them a follow!
@Ian_messina7
@Chrisvtv
@aaronmendezfilms

Music licensed from Musicbed. Get a 30-day free trial for the best music for your videos: https://mscbd.fm/lptgm

Outro music from ArtList IO – http://bit.ly/GregArtlistio – Get 2 months FREE!

IG: @lensprotogo
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My IG @gregfarnum

High-Key Narrative Lighting | Cinematography 101

Stay tuned to the end for a chance to win a prize!

Lighting narrative scenes is one of the most common situations you will find yourself in as a cinematographer. Some scripts call for dark, moody lighting, while others require a brighter overall frame. High-key refers to a scene that has very few shadows in the frame. Today, director of photography Austin Sabado teaches us three different ways to shoot high-key narrative scenes, using bounced light, practicals, and small accents to fill shadows.

In this video, Austin shows us three different methods for creating high-key narrative lighting. In our first setup, he creates a nighttime interior while still maintaining a high-key look. This is done using practicals in the frame and an overall warm color to the lighting. In our second setup, he uses the same setup but changes the scene to a day interior. He then supplements the available daylight to reduce the contrast of the scene. In the third and last setup, he creates another day interior using a large bounced light and overhead fill. In addition to large sources he uses practicals to add interest points to the frame.

The main techniques that we will be discussing today are 1) Pay attention to the small details.
2) Look for practicals. 3) Think about how your lights are being motivated. Paying attention to the small details means scanning the frame to look for dark spots or other distracting elements. Looking for practicals means seeing if there are any lights in-frame and how you can utilize them, or adding your own practicals. Motivating your lights means being intentional about where your light is coming from within the scene. This could be a lamp off screen or a large window.

As filmmakers we are always trying to tell stories better. That means using lighting to enhance the emotion of the script, and create a unique experience for our viewers. Different lighting styles will create different feelings and emotions. A dark scene will create one feeling while a brightly lit scene will create a completely different feeling. The most important thing is what works best for the story and what looks best in the space. That way your films will stand out not just visually but also thematically.

Connect with Austin: https://www.instagram.com/austinsabado/
Connect with Gracie: https://www.instagram.com/graciecatanz/
Connect with Shayne: https://www.instagram.com/slightsprite/
Connect with Valentina: https://www.twitter.com/valentinavee
Connect with Chetco: https://www.instagram.com/thechetco/

Want more free lighting and cinematography tutorials? Subscribe to us so you never miss an episode: https://goo.gl/QwazdM

🎥How to Light the Cinematic Film Look!

🎥Free Cinematography Lessons From Experts!
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

🎥Subscribe to Aputure:
https://www.youtube.com/aputurephoto
https://www.facebook.com/aputure
https://www.instagram.com/aputuretech

🎥Connect with the A-Team!
Ted – https://instagram.com/aputure_ted
Benny – https://instagram.com/aputure_benny

🎥GET APUTURE GEAR:
http://lddy.no/3dkv

🎥MUSIC:
http://bit.ly/pb_aputure

🎥GRAPHICS:
http://bit.ly/Aputure_RS

Summary:
Aputure’s YouTube channel provides free high-quality cinematography, lighting, and filmmaking educational content to help you take your film projects to the next level.

How to setup a LAV MIC and get GOOD levels – DSLR, Mirrorless, XLR

In this video, I run through the full setup (besides pairing) of a wireless lav mic with a DSLR or mirrorless camera using the 1/8in jack along with all the setting in the camera to get good levels as well as with a camera with XLR inputs.

DLSR/Mirrorless Setup: 0:26

XLR Setup: 6:00

Sennheiser G4: http://bit.ly/2Y3pdMN

Rodelink Filmmaker Lav: http://bit.ly/2TDUtCZ

Music licensed from Musicbed. Get a 30-day free trial for the best music for your videos: https://mscbd.fm/lptgm

Outro music from ArtList IO – http://bit.ly/GregArtlistio – Get 2 months FREE!

IG: @lensprotogo
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Lensprotogo.com

My IG @gregfarnum

Top 10 Action Movies of All Time – Part 1

Top 10 Action Movies of All Time - Part 1

We’re due for another deep genre dive here on Movie Lists, and with the summer heat already bearing down on us, it’s all action all the time! From Action Comedy to the Epic, here is part 1 of our look at 10 of the best action films ever!

The Picks:

Action Comedy – The Legend of the Drunken Master
Sci Fi Action – Terminator 2: Judgment Day
War – Black Hawk Down
Action Adventure – Mad Max: Fury Road
Epic – Seven Samurai

Follow us Twitter: https://twitter.com/CineFixNetwork
And we’re on the Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CineFixNetwork

More Recent CineFix Videos:

Johnny Mnemonic – What’s the Difference?

The Little Mermaid – What’s the Difference?

Check out our picks for best documentaries of all time!

How Spike Lee Adapted Ron Stallworth’s insane true story for BlacKkKlansman

I’m gonna need you to stay late and watch these Things You Didn’t Know About Office Space, mmkay?

What’s the difference between Stephen King’s Pet Sematary and Mary Lambert’s film?

Don’t miss our analysis of 3 brilliant moments from Akira Kurosawa’s High and Low!
https://youtu.be/LC8KYm85zig

Cinematography preparation || Bradford Young

Cinematography preparation || Bradford Young

In this episode Bradford talks to us about how he prepares for films. How does he get across the look he wants to others on set? How does a look book help him on the shoot?


Cooke Optics TV
www.cookeoptics.tv

Website http://www.cookeoptics.com
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/cookeoptics
Twitter http://www.twitter.com/cooke_optics
Instagram http://www.instagram.com/cookeoptics
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/2831810/

Thank you to the British Society of Cinematographers (BSC). http://www.bscine.com/

Filmed with a Sony FS5 and Cooke Mini S4/i Lenses.
Produced by ImageNova. http://www.imagenova.co.uk.
Email cathy@cookeoptics.com for enquires or leave a comment!