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A First Look at the New Fujifilm X-T200 Camera

A First Look at the New Fujifilm X-T200 Camera

The Fujifilm X-T200 is the latest camera body from the company and the newest member of the beloved X Series line of cameras. With some notable features and a very reasonable price, it looks to be like a potential winner for lots of photographers and filmmakers. This great video takes a first look at the camera and what you can expect from it.

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Using the New Canon 1D X Mark III to Shoot the NFL Playoffs

Using the New Canon 1D X Mark III to Shoot the NFL Playoffs

The 1D X Mark III is undoubtedly a powerhouse on paper, with specs that are sure to make any photographer drool. But do those specs translate to the sort of real-world performance working pros need? This excellent video discusses how it holds up when put to the test in the challenging environment of the NFL playoffs.

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Two Screens for Productive Post-Processing: A Review of the Asus Zenbook Duo for Photography

Two Screens for Productive Post-Processing: A Review of the Asus Zenbook Duo for Photography

Ever wished your laptop had a bit more workspace? The Asus Zenbook Duo has a secondary display right on the main panel that allows for increased productivity and multitasking.

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A Review of the Sony FE 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G OSS Lens

A Review of the Sony FE 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G OSS Lens

We would all love to have the absolutely astounding supertelephoto primes that the pros use, but with prices well into five figures, they are simply not in the cards for most of us. Luckily, in the last few years, companies have been releasing better and better long zooms at more affordable prices. This great review takes a look at the Sony FE 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G OSS lens.

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My Week With a Hasselblad

My Week With a Hasselblad

I recently got the chance to use the New Hasselblad X1D II for a week. It was my first experience with medium format and required a bit of adapting on a learning curve. Here are my first impressions about the body, design, lenses, and general usability of the camera.

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For All Filmmakers and Content Creators: Fstoppers Reviews Music Licensing Company Audiio

For All Filmmakers and Content Creators: Fstoppers Reviews Music Licensing Company Audiio

Finding and licensing music: it has got to be one of those painful tasks for anyone who creates videos or slideshows for clients, which is why we are reviewing a new player in town, Audiio.

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A Long-Term Review of the Sony a7R IV

A Long-Term Review of the Sony a7R IV

The Sony a7R IV was a spectacular camera on paper when it was first released, building on the long history of success and innovation in the R line of cameras. The marquee features were the large bump in resolution and the addition of some impressive autofocus features taken from the a9, along with other improvements, such as better ergonomics. If you have been interested in the camera, this great video review takes a real world look at the camera after six months of usage.

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Fstoppers Reviews the Haida M7 Filter Holder

Fstoppers Reviews the Haida M7 Filter Holder

With smaller mirrorless cameras becoming more popular for traveling photographers, smaller and lighter filter systems are becoming the appropriate choice for many more people. While 75mm square filters are nothing new, there are some great options being made for them, and today, we’ll take a look at Haida’s new M7 Filter Holder kit.

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Adapting Wildlife Lenses: Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Review on a Sony Camera

Adapting Wildlife Lenses: Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Review on a Sony Camera

A little over a year ago and after much success with their 150-600mm lenses, Sigma began selling an ultra-zoom 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports lens offered in Canon EF, Nikon F, and Sigma SA mounts. I went with option D and adapted it to Sony FE.

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A Review of the New Canon 1D X Mark III

A Review of the New Canon 1D X Mark III

Canon recently released the 1D X Mark III with features like 5.5K 12-bit internal raw video and a whopping 20 fps continuous rate (with mechanical or electronic shutter), along with a bevy of other improvements and new features. How does it hold up in the real world? This great video takes a good look at the new camera to answer that question.

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Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.

DSC_0691-2-1024x768 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
Core FX9 V-Mount adapter with a Hypercore Neo Mini battery on my PXW-FX9

One of the things about the FX9 that makes no sense is it’s external DC input. When you are using just the camera body the FX9 requires a rather odd-ball 19.5 volts to power it via it’s DC in connector. Most cameras have a 12v to 16v input range so they can be used with the multitude of V-Mount or Gold Mount batteries that are common place in the world of professional video. But not the FX9.  The FX9 is also fairly power hungry so the standard BP-U batteries can be a little limiting, especially if you also need to power any accessories as the camera doesn’t have a power output. A V-Mount battery will run the camera for a long time and they generally have D-Tap power outlets, but they are the wrong voltage for the FX9s external input. So if you want to use a V-Mount battery, as I do, then you need not only a mounting plate but also a voltage converter.

The adapter I have chosen to use is manufactured by Core. Why this one? One thing that was important for me is not only to be able to power the camera from a V-Mount battery, but also to be able to power it from a standard external 12 volt power supply such as found in most studios, or something like a car battery. The Core CXV-FX9 adapter includes a voltage regulator that takes the 12 to 16 volt range of a typical Lithium battery and converts it to the 19.5v needed by the FX9. It also has an industry standard 4 pin XLR connector that you can use to power the camera from a 12v external power supply.

DSC_0681-1024x768 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
The Core FX9 V-Mount adapter has an industry standard 4 pin XLR input for standard 12v power supplies.

Hot Swap:

If you have a power supply connected to the 4 pin XLR you can hot swap the V-Mount batteries. If you have a battery on the adapter you can hot swap to and from the external power. During hot swapping the adapter not only continues to feed the camera with power but also the 2 D-Tap ports on the adapter remain powered.

Low Battery Warning:

One issue that all these adapters have is that they have to convert the battery voltage up to 19.5 volts and this is what is fed to the cameras DC in connector. This means that the camera has no direct connection to the battery, so it has no way to know the charge state of the battery. All you will see in the viewfinder as an indication of the output of the voltage converter. This will remain at a constant 19.5v all the way until the battery is flat and cuts off, at which point the camera will just die. That’s not good, if you are halfway through recording something it could corrupt your media. You won’t have any warning in the camera of the battery going flat.

To try to address this at least in part the Core adapter has an LED light on the operators side that is green when the battery is well charged, but turns to red when there is only around 10% of the batteries capacity left. This does at least give some warning of a battery about to die.

DSC_0689-1024x768 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
The Core FX9 adapter has an LED battery status indicator that turns red and flashes when the battery voltage gets low.

As well as the adapter, I’m trying out a couple of Core’s Hypercore Neo Mini batteries. These are nice, compact 98Wh batteries. They are UN Tested and certified so meet all the requirements for air travel. These batteries have a clever LCD display that displays the available run time of the battery. This is much more advanced than a simple charge indicator (it has one of those too). The battery actually detects the load being drawn from it. It also knows the exact state of charge of the battery.

DSC_0680-1024x768 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
Core SWX Hyoercore Neo Mini 98Wh battery with incredibly accurate run time display giving the time in minutes until the battery will be flat based on the cameras power draw.

Using these it is able to calculate with great accuracy how long it will be before it will be flat. I have found this to be remarkably accurate, typically to within just a few minutes. I’ve been using this display to let me know when I need to start thinking about changing the battery. It’s accuracy gives me the confidence to continue shooting until I’m down to the last few minutes of run time. Typically I’m getting around 2.5 hours without the Atomso Ninja recorder and just under 2 hours with the Ninja from one of these excellent little batteries.

DSC_0666-scaled-e1578517846130-955x1024 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
Core V-Mount plate for the FX9 showing the lugs that lock into slots in the camera battery compartment to eliminate any flex or wobble.
DSC_0686-scaled-e1578517993169-1024x935 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
There are two D-Tap power outlets at the top of the Core FX9 V-Mount plates as well as 3 1/4″ mounting holes for accessories.

Attaching the adapter:

Attaching the adapter to the camera is easy. It uses the same mounting points as Sony’s XDCA extension unit. So there are lugs that slide into slots inside the FX9’s battery compartment as well as two small bolts that attach it to the top of the camera. This makes it incredibly secure with no wobble or other movement. I would have no concerns about supporting the entire camera rig from the battery adapter or adding perhaps a V-Mount wireless video link and then large or heavy batteries behind that. It’s very secure and it looks like it’s meant to be there. Another nice touch is that as well as the 2 D-Tap power ports on the top of the adapter there are also 3 additional 1/4″ mounting points for accessories such as monitors or wireless receivers etc.

I do have one small criticism. The position of the D-Tap ports is quite close to the edge of the adapter. If you are using a tall battery and you have a very fat D-Tap plug they can interfere with each other.

Despite this the Core V-Mount battery adapter gets a big thumbs up from me. The voltage indication is most useful as is the ability to use a normal 4 pin 12v XLR feed.

DSC_0684-2-1024x768 Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries.
The Core FX9 V-Mount battery adapter gets a big thumbs up from me.

Core FX9 V-Mount Adapter and Core Hypercore Neo Mini Batteries. was first posted on January 8, 2020 at 9:31 pm.
©2018 “XDCAM-USER.COM“. Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at contact@xdcam-user.com

A Review of the Panasonic S1’s After 10 Months

A Review of the Panasonic S1's After 10 Months

The Panasonic S1 is a nicely balanced stills and video camera that brings with it quite a few top-shelf features all packaged in a rugged, versatile, and well-designed body. This great video takes a look at how the camera has held up after using it for almost a year.

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Hands On: Insta360’s Clever New Modular Camera

Hands On: Insta360’s Clever New Modular Camera

Insta360’s ONE X has been a huge success for them; however, in the wake of the GoPro Hero 8, it’s about time they meet new demands. The GoPro Hero 8 and GoPro MAX 360 cameras are the flagships to beat: Insta360 is trying to take on both at once, for the same price as one.

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Fstoppers Reviews the Laowa 4mm Fisheye for Sony APS-C

Fstoppers Reviews the Laowa 4mm Fisheye for Sony APS-C

Fisheye lenses are always nice to have in your bag. Though they may not always be applicable, especially for professional work, having a nice fisheye lens adds a certain spice to your photos.

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Fstoppers Reviews the GoPro MAX 360° Camera

Fstoppers Reviews the GoPro MAX 360° Camera

When I needed a 360-degree camera for my real estate photography, I was looking for the Ricoh Theta Z1. I got the new GoPro MAX 360 instead, because the Ricoh was not available at that time. Now, I want to share my thoughts on this 360-degree action camera.

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Dull, Brilliant, Disappointing, Fun: Fstoppers Reviews the Tamron 24mm f/2.8 for Sony

Dull, Brilliant, Disappointing, Fun: Fstoppers Reviews the Tamron 24mm f/2.8 for Sony

There isn’t exactly a wealth of affordable options when it comes to 24mm prime lenses for Sony full-frame cameras, so Tamron’s new lens is a welcome addition to the line-up, though it does have its idiosyncrasies.

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Fstoppers Reviews Four Camera Backpacks

Fstoppers Reviews Four Camera Backpacks

Opinions on which camera backpack a photographer should use are probably only second to which camera system they should use. With so many brands of packs out there, and not to mention multiple versions by each of the manufactures, it can be challenging to pick a backpack. To help the readers of Fstoppers, I took a look at four backpacks to see how they stack up.

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ACS Technical Panel Review The PXW-FX9

The ASC have produced a video report about some of the testing that they did with a pre-production FX9. It’s quite a long video but has some interesting side by side comparisons with the FS7 which we all already know very well. You’ve heard much of what’s in the video from me already, but I’m a Sony guy, so it’s good to hear the same things from the much more impartial ASC.

With my super geek hat on it was really interesting to see the colour response tests performed by Pawel Achtel ACS at 37.08. These tests use a very pure white light source that is split into the full spectrum and then the monochromatic light is projected onto the sensor. It’s a very telling test. I was quite surprised to see how large the FS7’s response is, it’s not something I have ever had the tools to measure. The test also highlights a lack of far red response from the FS7. It’s not terrible, but does help explain why warm skin tones perhaps don’t always look as nice as they could. I do wonder if this is down to the characteristics of the cameras IR cut filter as we also know the sensor to be quite sensitive to IR. The good news is that the PXW-FX9 has what Pawel claims to be the best colour accuracy of any camera he’s tested, and he’s tested pretty much all of the current cinema cameras. Take a look for yourself.

Sony FX9 ACS Roundtable from ACS on Vimeo.


ACS Technical Panel Review The PXW-FX9 was first posted on December 31, 2019 at 10:27 am.
©2018 “XDCAM-USER.COM“. Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at contact@xdcam-user.com