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Use the Basic Human Aesthetic of Symmetry to Improve Your Composition

Use the Basic Human Aesthetic of Symmetry to Improve Your Composition

Symmetry is a basic aesthetic that you can use to greatly improve your composition and attention of the photo. In this article, I dive into different ways you can use symmetry in your photos.

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How to Use a Polarizing Filter

How to Use a Polarizing Filter

The polarizing filter is an essential part of the landscape photographer’s tool kit. It can make a huge difference to the final photo. However, there are a few things to be aware of.

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This Time-Lapse of Alien-Like Marine Life Will Leave You Transfixed

This Time-Lapse of Alien-Like Marine Life Will Leave You Transfixed

Macro and time-lapse photography offer great ways of seeing the world in a different light; in ways the eyes on their own can’t replicate.

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Conservation Photographer Paul Nicklen Spreads a Little Love for the Manatees

Conservation Photographer Paul Nicklen Spreads a Little Love for the Manatees

Everyone’s favorite aquatic marshmallow, the manatee, is having a bit of a moment. Just a couple weeks ago, Florida’s warm waterways set the mood for a sizable manatee orgy, causing traffic jams on nearby roads. Rubberneckers first thought they were witnessing a whale in distress, but it was just good old fashioned sea cow polyamory.

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The Mesmerising Results of Shooting Macro Water Droplet Refractions

The Mesmerising Results of Shooting Macro Water Droplet Refractions

I have no qualms in admitting macro photography isn’t my thing, but these images stopped me in my ferocious scrolling. One photographer is sharing images he creates of water droplets refracting light from what is behind them. Click through for some of the most mesmerizing macro photos you’ve ever seen.

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Stranded in the Forest? Simple Tips for Photographing Nature Safely

Stranded in the Forest? Simple Tips for Photographing Nature Safely

Recently, a hiker in Hawaii ended up lost in the forest for 17 days, highlighting the danger behind even short hikes. There are a number of simple things that nature photographers can do to stay safe in nature.

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Shooting Long Exposures in the Arctic Circle

Shooting Long Exposures in the Arctic Circle

If you had the opportunity to visit the somewhere in the Arctic Circle, what sorts of images would you hope to shoot while traveling? If long exposures cross your mind then this one’s for you.

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OPTIC: Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel, Imaging Conference in NYC

OPTIC: Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel, Imaging Conference in NYC

If you are an avid outdoor photographer like myself and will be in the New York area next week, you’ll be delighted to know B&H Photo and Video is holding their annual OPTIC Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference this coming June 2-5.

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Photography and Hiking for Pleasure, Not Profit

Photography and Hiking for Pleasure, Not Profit

When’s the last time that you let yourself shoot images without giving a thought to their monetary value? It’s too easy to get caught up thinking about how to monetize our profession and it’s so important to step back, slow down, and just shoot for the fun of it.

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A Guide to the Not so Obvious Photo Spots in Arizona

A Guide to the Not so Obvious Photo Spots in Arizona

People are constantly visiting me here in Arizona, and wanting me to point out the best places to take photos. Of course everyone wants to hit the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon, and maybe Horseshoe Bend.

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Outdoor and Wildlife Photography Safety

Outdoor and Wildlife Photography Safety

As I’m preparing to search for black bears to photograph, my personal safety has certainly come to mind a few times. When photographing wildlife, the combined safety of both ourselves and the species we are seeking out should be the top priority. In this article, I go over a few things to keep in mind when you head out into the great outdoors with your camera.

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Photographer Documents One of the Rarest Treks on Earth

Photographer Documents One of the Rarest Treks on Earth

There are mysterious places that swirl with intrigue and evoke dreams of the sights that lie within the unknown. These are the places that often seem so perfectly suited for a photographer with a wandering spirit. Arriving at the wondrous location, however, is only half the battle for the inclined documenter.

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We talk about artistic inspiration all the time – but scientific inspiration is a thing too

We talk about artistic inspiration all the time – but scientific inspiration is a thing too

File 20190215 56226 u9o2q2.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
IR Stone/Shutterstock.com

Tom McLeish, University of York

I don’t know why it took so long to dawn on me – after 20 years of a scientific career – that what we call the “scientific method” really only refers the second half of any scientific story. It describes how we test and refine the ideas and hypotheses we have about nature through the engagement of experiment or observation and theoretical ideas and models.

But something must happen before this. All of this process rests upon the vital, essential, precious ability to conceive of those ideas in the first place. And, sadly, we talk very little about this creative core of science: the imagining of what the unseen structures in the world might be like.

We need to be more open about it. I have been repeatedly saddened by hearing from school students that they were put off science “because there seemed no room there for my own creativity”. What on earth have we done to leave this formulaic impression of how science works?

Science and poetry

The 20th century biologist Peter Medawar was one of the few recent writers to discuss the role of creativity in science at all. He claimed that we are quietly embarrassed about it, because the imaginative phase of science possesses no “method” at all. In his 1982 book Pluto’s Republic he points out:

The weakness of the hypothetico-deductive system, in so far as it might profess to cover a complete account of the scientific process, lies in its disclaiming any power to explain how hypotheses come into being.

Medawar is equally critical of glib comparisons of scientific creativity to the sources of artistic inspiration. Because whereas the sources of artistic inspiration are often communicated – they “travel” – scientific creativity is very much private. Scientists, he claims, unlike artists, do not share their tentative imaginings or inspired moments, but only the polished results of complete investigations.

The romantic poet William Wordsworth, on the other hand, two centuries ago, foresaw a future in which:

The remotest discoveries of the Chemist, the Botanist, or Mineralogist, will be as proper objects of the Poet’s art as any upon which it can be employed, if the time should ever come when these things shall be familiar to us.

Here is the need for ideas to “travel” again – which, if Medawar is correct, they have still failed to do. By and large poets still don’t write about science (with some notable exceptions such as R S Thomas). Nor is science “an object of contemplation”, as the historian Jacques Barzun put it. Yet the few scientists who have vocalised their experience of formulating new ideas are in no doubt about its contemplative and creative essence. Einstein, in his book with the physicist Leopold Infeld, The Evolution of Physics, wrote:

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.

You don’t need to be a great scientist to know this. In my own experience I have seen mathematical solutions in dreams (one dream of a mathematical solution even coming to me and independently and identically to a collaborator on the same night), and imagined a specific structure of protein dynamics while sitting on a hillside.

Hillside or theoretical physics lab?
Tom McLeish

There is a large literature on “creativity” in science, but I have found nothing that really speaks to the lack of discussion of scientific inspiration today or to the pain of lingering experiences in education that set sciences and the arts and humanities in conflicting and opposed camps.

Stories of creativity

So I set off to ask scientists I knew to narrate, not just their research findings, but the pathways by which they got there. As a sort of “control experiment”, I did the same with poets, composers and artists.

I read past accounts of creation in mathematics (Poincaré is very good), novel-writing (Henry James wrote a book about it), art (from Picasso to my Yorkshire friend, the artist late Graeme Willson), and participated in a two day workshop in Cambridge on creativity with physicists and cosmologists. Philosophy, from medieval to 20th century phenomenology, has quite a lot to add.

Empyrean, an artwork inspired by the ancient geocentric model of the cosmos.
Alexandra Carr

From all these tales emerged a different way to think about what science achieves and where it lies in our long human story – as not only a route to knowledge, but also as a contemplative practice that meets a human need, in ways complementary to art or music. Above all I could not deny the extraordinary way that personal stories of creating the new mapped closely onto each other, whether these sprung from an attempt to create a series of mixed-media artworks reflecting the sufferings of war, or the desire to know what astronomical event had unleashed unprecedented X-ray and radio signals.

A common narrative contour of a glimpsed and desired end, a struggle to achieve it, the experience of constraint and dead-end, and even the mysterious “aha” moments that speak of hidden and sub-conscious processes of thought choosing their moments to communicate into our consciousness – all this is a story shared among scientists and artists alike.

In my resulting book – The Poetry and Music of Science – I try to make sense of why science’s imaginative and creative core is so hidden, and how to bring it into the light. It’s not the book I first imagined – it just wouldn’t permit a structure of separate accounts of scientific and artistic creativity. Their entanglements run too deep for that.

Instead there emerged three “modes” of imagination that both science and art engage: the visual, the textual and the abstract. We think in pictures, in words, and in the abstract forms that we call mathematics and music. It has become increasingly obvious to me that the “two cultures” division between the humanities and sciences is an artificial invention of the late 19th century. Perhaps the best way to address this is simply to ignore it, and start talking to one another more.The Conversation

Tom McLeish, Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics, University of York

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The post We talk about artistic inspiration all the time – but scientific inspiration is a thing too appeared first on Interalia Magazine.