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ProCamera Is Still the iOS Photo App to Beat

ProCamera Is Still the iOS Photo App to Beat

I’ve been looking at photo apps for the iPhone since the phone was first released in 2007. From the start, it was pretty clear Apple wasn’t getting the most out of their own camera with the built-in app, and third parties rushed in. If you wanted to take serious photos, many of the apps were wanting, offering stickers and other features most pros would disdain. But not this app.

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The Reality of Photographing the Himalayas: Acute Mountain Sickness During a Photography Workshop

The Reality of Photographing the Himalayas: Acute Mountain Sickness During a Photography Workshop

One of the bucket list places to photograph for many photographers is among the giants of the world’s 8,000-meter mountain peaks in Nepal. One of the things you can’t plan for is how your body will respond to those heights. What happens when you’re leading a photography workshop and your body won’t adjust to the altitude?

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10 Crucial Values You Need to Know in Landscape Photography

10 Crucial Values You Need to Know in Landscape Photography

Technical perfection, originality, environmentalism, story, aesthetics, and realism are all concepts or principles we as landscape photographers can value. What we value will define how we do our landscape photography and if those photos will ever be any good.

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1,500 Homes Lost, 23 Deaths, 500 Million Animals Killed: These 75 Images Show the Devastation of Australia’s Bushfires

1,500 Homes Lost, 23 Deaths, 500 Million Animals Killed: These 75 Images Show the Devastation of Australia’s Bushfires

“I hope to still have a house after this weekend.” These are the confronting, painfully real words my friend said to me last night as he evacuated his family to Sydney, with fires closing in around his house from every direction. These images show just how bad it is.

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“Evil Eyes” Sunrise Captured During Solar Eclipse

Historically speaking, solar eclipses have been surrounded by myths, legends, and superstitions. If you’re one of those individuals who remains superstitious about sunrises and solar eclipses, then you should probably avoid looking at this image for too long.

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No Reason to Travel Just Yet: Here Are Five Reasons to Photograph Locally

No Reason to Travel Just Yet: Here Are Five Reasons to Photograph Locally

A thing I have learned from doing a lot of travel landscape photography is the value of photographing the local environment. Here, I present five reasons to go out and photograph the local landscapes and nature.

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Fall Landscapes and Changing Your Mindset

Fall Landscapes and Changing Your Mindset

Landscape photography is just as much about creating a plan as it is about being able to change that plan when what you are hoping for simply won’t work. Here’s a simple reminder to get out of your own way when creating art in the field.

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Critique the Community Plants or Flowers

Plants or Flowers

Submit your best foliage photo for a chance to win a free Fstoppers tutorial

We want to see your best images of plants or flowers for our next Critique the Community.

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How to Take Photos Faster

How to Take Photos Faster

As a photographer, you have probably been told to slow down and focus on your composition to make the best possible photo. What we also know is there are many fleeting moments and being ready for these are of utmost importance if you want to catch them.

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Wildlife Filmmaker Has a Close Call With a Leopard

Wildlife Filmmaker Has a Close Call With a Leopard

One way to increase your chances of getting a good wildlife image is to carry out a thorough overview of a potential area. That’s why having a solid understanding of the subject’s behavior is so important. Sometimes, though, even the most seasoned wildlife veteran can get caught off guard, as this incredibly lucky gentleman was reminded.

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We may just have solved the great mystery of why drops splash

We may just have solved the great mystery of why drops splash

CK Foto/Shutterstock

James Sprittles, University of Warwick

From the raindrops that soak you on your way to work to the drops of coffee that inevitably end up on your white shirt when you arrive, you’d be forgiven for thinking of drops as a mere nuisance.

But beneath a mundane facade, droplets exhibit natural beauty and conceal complex physics that scientists have been trying to figure out for decades. Recently, I have contributed to this field by working on a new theory explaining what happens to the critical thin layer of air between a drop of water and a surface to cause a splash.

At just a few thousandths of a second, the lifetime of a splashing drop is too rapid for us to see. It took pioneering advances in high-speed imaging to capture these events – the most iconic being Edgerton’s Milk Drop Coronet in 1957. These pictures simultaneously captured the public’s imagination with their aesthetic nature while intriguing physicists with their surprising complexity. The most obvious question is why, and when, do drops splash?

Nowadays, cameras can take over a million frames per second and resolve the fine details of a splash. However, these advances have raised as many questions as they have answered. Most importantly, remarkable observations, coming from the NagelLab in 2005, showed that the air surrounding the drop plays a critical role. By reducing the air pressure, one can prevent a splash (see second video). In fact, drops which splash at the bottom of Mount Everest may not do so at the top, where the air pressure is lower.

Ethanol drop at normal pressure splashes.
Ethanol drop at low pressure doesn’t splash.

The discoveries created an explosion of experimental work aimed at uncovering the curious details of the air’s role. New experimental methods revealed incredible dynamics: millimetre-sized liquid drops are controlled by the behaviour of microscopic air films that are 1,000 times smaller.

Coffee splash pattern on the right next to ring from mug.
Roger Karlsson/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Notably, after a liquid drop contacts a solid it can be prevented from spreading across it by a microscopically thin layer of air that it can’t push aside. The sizes involved are equivalent to a one-centimetre layer of air stopping a tsunami wave spreading across a beach. When this occurs, a sheet of liquid can fly away from the main drop and break into smaller droplets – so that a splash is generated.
From a coffee stain all we can see is the outcome of this event – a pool of liquid (the drop) surrounded by a ring of smaller drops (the splash).

Major breakthrough

Experimental analyses have produced incredibly detailed observations of drops splashing. But they do not establish why the drops splash, which means we don’t understand the underlying physics. Remarkably, for such a seemingly innocuous problem the classical theory of fluids – used to forecast weather, design ships and predict blood flow – is inadequate. This is because the air layer’s height becomes comparable to the distance air molecules travel between collisions. So for this specific problem we need to feed in microscopic details that the classical theory simply doesn’t account for.

How a microscopic layer of air affects water droplets.

The air’s behaviour can only be captured by a theory originally developed for violent aerodynamic gas flows – such as for space shuttles entering the Earth’s atmosphere – namely the kinetic theory of gases. My new article, published in Physical Review Letters, is the first to use kinetic theory to understand how the air film behaves as it is displaced by a liquid spreading over a solid.

The article establishes criteria for the maximum speed at which a liquid can stably spread over a solid. It was already known that for a splash to be produced, this critical speed must be exceeded. If the speed is lower than that, the drop spreads smoothly instead. Notably, the new theory explains why reducing the air pressure can suppress splashing: in this case, air escapes more easily from the layer and provides less resistance to the liquid drop. This is the missing piece of a jigsaw to which numerous important scientific contributions have been made since the experimental discoveries of 2005.

Important applications

While being of fundamental scientific interest, an understanding of the conditions that cause splashing can be exploited – leading to potential breakthroughs in a number of practical fields.

One example is 3D printing where liquid drops form the building blocks of tailor-made products such as hearing aids. Here, stopping splashing is key to making products of the desired quality. Another important area is forensic science, where blood-stain-pattern analysis relies on splash characteristics to provide insight into where the blood came from – yielding vital information in a criminal investigation.

Most promisingly, the new theory will have applications to a wide range of related flows where microscopic layers of air appear. For example, in climate science it will enable us to understand how water drops collide during the formation of clouds and to estimate the quantity of gas being dragged into our oceans by rainfall.

Do keep this in mind the next time you splatter coffee drops across your desk. Take a moment to admire the pattern and appreciate the underlying complexity before cursing and heading for your “mopper upper” of choice.The Conversation

James Sprittles, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, University of Warwick

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The post We may just have solved the great mystery of why drops splash appeared first on Interalia Magazine.

Finding Calm Photographing Gloomy Minimalist Flowers

Finding Calm Photographing Gloomy Minimalist Flowers

Call it a personal project or way of finding the calm again in photographs, lately I’ve been shooting a portrait style “sad flower” collection and I love it. Check out the how and why and if it tickles your fancy you can give it a try too.

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National Geographic Photographers Explain What It Means to Be a Contributor to the Famous Publication

National Geographic Photographers Explain What It Means to Be a Contributor to the Famous Publication

National Geographic Magazine has been educating people since 1888 about cultures, places, wildlife, and science. While the writing is always well researched and written, it is the photography supporting the essays that has really captured the attention of its readers. Some of its current crop of contributing photographers discuss their roles, photos, and why photography plays an important part of raising awareness in this video.

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Have You Ever Wondered What Photographing Gray Owls in the Wild is Like?

Have You Ever Wondered What Photographing Gray Owls in the Wild is Like?

How many of you folks out there have actually seen an owl in the wild? If you’ve ever wondered what photographing them must be like, this video will take you through an evening in pursuit of owls in the Tetons.

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Photographing Jackson Hole Wildlife With the Sony a7R IV and 200-600mm

Photographing Jackson Hole Wildlife With the Sony a7R IV and 200-600mm

In late September 2019, I joined up with three other wildlife and landscape photographers to take on Jackson Hole, Wyoming for a few days surrounding the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) WildSpeak West symposium. In this video I review my best images taken with my new gear from this short but productive three-day trip to the Tetons.

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