Nikon Is No Longer Accepting Equipment for Repair

Nikon Is No Longer Accepting Equipment for Repair

As coronavirus continues to cause shutdowns across many industries around the globe, the camera world is feeling the effects too. Nikon is the latest to announce restrictions, as they have shut down their repair program for the time being and will not be accepting any gear.

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Filmmaker’s Spring, 2020 Issue Online and Un-Paywalled

Filmmaker‘s Spring 2020 issue is now online, arriving in mailboxes, and at whatever newsstands and bookstores that are still open amidst the Coronavirus pandemic. And because so many of us are working from home, sheltering in place, or on some form of lockdown, we’ve released every article from the paywall and are also providing to all a link to a free PDF of the entire issue. As Managing Editor Vadim Rizov wrote in a tweet, the issue’s runlist is one organized around something of a now-phantom slate of films and topics. Going to press at the end of February, the calendar […]

What Could You Accomplish With a $3 Thrift Store Camera?

What Could You Accomplish With a $3 Thrift Store Camera?

There are loads of cameras with incredible capabilities out there that make getting images under even the most difficult conditions possible. However, could you spend just a few dollars on a camera and still take great images? This fun video shows what you can accomplish with a 30-year-old camera from a thrift store.

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12-Year-Old Boy With Autism Who Photographs Toy Cars as if They Were Life-Size Launching Photography Book

12-Year-Old Boy With Autism Who Photographs Toy Cars as if They Were Life-Size Launching Photography Book

A 12-year-old boy who is on the autism spectrum has found an escape in the form of taking photos of his toy cars and making them look lifelike. Photographing the model vehicles has helped him cope with his everyday struggles, and he has now raised over $43,000 to fund a coffee table book of his work.

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Photographing Landscapes at Lofoten With the Fujifilm GFX100

Photographing Landscapes at Lofoten With the Fujifilm GFX100

For my annual trip to Lofoten, I had the opportunity to shoot with the Fujifilm GFX 100. Prior to the trip, I had just a few weeks to get acquainted with the camera. Here are my thoughts on this 102-megapixel camera for landscape photography.

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Professional Photographers of America is offering free access to its 1,100+ classes amidst COVID-19 quarantines

The Professional Photographers of America (PPA) has announced it’s unlocking all of its more than 1,1000 online photography classes for the next two weeks as a way to help those who are quarantined amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

On the sign up page to access the free classes, PPA says:

‘Times are tough – we need to be at our best. More kindness. More patience. More giving. And we at PPA want to pitch in to make things a little easier. What better way to spend your time at home than preparing your business for when things kick back into high gear? That’s why PPA is opening ALL of our online education to ALL photographers and small business owners worldwide for the next two weeks.’

To access the more than 1,100 classes, all you need to do is sign up for a free account on this page. There, you are asked to enter your first name, last name, email, a password and the city, state and country you reside in. Once the account is created, you’ll automatically be sent to the page shown in the screenshot below, from where you can choose the class(es) you want to partake in.

The available classes range in topics and genres, from classes on how to get started with your photography business and create contracts to guides on how to balance natural light with flash and how to organize keywords and metadata in Lightroom.

PPA CEO David Trust also shared a letter to the photography community, which you can read on the PPA website.

‘Social Distancing’ Isn’t Realistic for Photojournalists

'Social Distancing' Isn't Realistic for Photojournalists

Photojournalism is a contact sport. Or at least it used to be, before the coronavirus rolled into town. Despite the health risks with taking photographs of people in close quarters or crowds, photographers at news organizations around the country are still, more or less, on the job.

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Scientists: ‘Photon Ring’ Stacking Will Create Ultra-Sharp Black Hole Photos

The world’s first photo of black hole was published back in April 2019, and scientists have been laboring to find ways to capture sharper images of the mysterious regions of spacetime. Scientists are now saying that focusing on a black hole’s “photon ring” may lead to a huge increase in sharpness.

In a new paper published in Science Advances, lead author Michael Johnson of the Center for Astrophysics Harvard and Smithsonian describes how the swirling ring of photons around a black hole could be the key to unlocking sharp photos.

The blurry first-ever photo of a black hole from 2019.

“The image of a black hole actually contains a nested series of rings,” Johnson tells IFLScience. “Each successive ring has about the same diameter but becomes increasingly sharper because its light orbited the black hole more times before reaching the observer. With the current EHT image, we’ve caught just a glimpse of the full complexity that should emerge in the image of any black hole.”

The EHT that Johnson refers to is the Event Horizon Telescope, a collection of telescopes scattered across the globe that combine their observations to form what is essentially an Earth-size telescope capable of imaging black holes.

By stacking images of a black hole’s “subrings,” we may one day be able to create a much sharper complete photo of what a black hole looks like.

In addition to seeing its form, scientists will also be able to use the same data to figure out a black hole’s mass, size, and spin.

To capture photos of subrings, however, we’ll need a bigger telescope than the Earth-sized one we already have — we’ll need to expand the size into space.

“What really surprised us was that while the nested subrings are almost imperceptible to the naked eye on images—even perfect images—they are strong and clear signals for arrays of telescopes called interferometers,” Johnson tells Phys.org. “While capturing black hole images normally requires many distributed telescopes, the subrings are perfect to study using only two telescopes that are very far apart.

“Adding one space telescope to the EHT would be enough.”

(via Science Advances via IFLScience)


Image credits: Header photo by George Wong (UIUC) and Michael Johnson (CfA)