The Nikon D6: Here are the official specifications

Editor’s note: This is a developing story and will be updated.

At long last, Nikon has released details of its newest flagship DSLR, the D6. As a camera that will find its way into the hands of sports and action photographers around the globe, it needs to live up to the speed, durability and quality of its predecessors – and though it doesn’t appear to break significant new ground, we expect the D6 will continue to serve the needs of demanding photographers very well indeed.

At the heart of the D6 is a 20.8MP sensor, offering the same resolution as the D5, but it’s now coupled with a new Expeed 6 processor and offers up to 14fps burst shooting with ‘E-type’ lenses (those with electromagnetically controlled diaphragms). Switch into live view, and the D6 will shoot silently at up to 10.5fps.

Perhaps the biggest change for end users, though, is an all-new autofocus system. Though the total number of points has gone down from 153 to 105, now all of those points are selectable and cross-type. Fifteen of the central points are F8 compatible, and the center point can focus down to -4.5EV. All other points are good down to -4EV.

In terms of video, the D6 continues to offer 4K/30p recording, but now comes with focus peaking and an option for MP4 recording.

The D6 makes do without any Compact Flash option, with Nikon offering a single version of the camera with dual XQD / CFExpress card slots. There have been some other tweaks as well, including a maximum shutter length of 30 minutes, the option to shoot different quality or sizes of JPEGs to different cards (basically a JPEG + JPEG shooting option), and Wi-Fi with Bluetooth as well as GPS capability are now built-in. Weight has gone up just slightly, from 1405g to 1440g including battery and memory cards.

Expect to see quite a few of these at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games! Let us know what you think of Nikon’s newest DSLR in the comments.

Nikon adds 20mm F1.8 and 24-200mm F4-6.3 to full-frame Z-series lens lineup

Nikon has announced full details of two more lenses on its full-frame Z-mount roadmap: a 20mm F1.8 S, and a 24-200mm F4-6.3 S with built-in stabilization. The 20mm F1.8 S is the widest prime in the native Z-mount lineup, and the 24-200mm F4-6.3 covers the widest focal range of existing FX Z series zooms.

The Nikon Z 20mm F1.8 S joins existing 24mm, 35mm and 50mm F1.8 primes for the system, and weighs 17.8oz (505g). Optically, it’s composed of 14 elements in 11 groups, including three ED and three aspherical elements. It uses a nine-blade aperture and offers Nano Crystal Coating. The Z 20mm F1.8 will accept 77mm filters.

The Z 24-200mm F4-6.3 S comprises 19 elements in 15 groups with two ED, two aspherical and a single aspherical ED element. Built-in stabilization is rated to 4.5 stops and the lens uses a seven-blade aperture. It uses only the newer Arneo coating to reduce flare – no Nano Crystal Coating. The 24-200mm accepts 67mm filters and weighs 20.1oz (570g).

New Tilta Camera Cage for Alexa Mini LF/MINI & Trade In Deal

Tilta has a new camera cage for the ARRI ALEXA Mini LF/Mini as well as a deal where if you have one of their existing ALEXA Mini camera cages you can trade it in for the new cage. Alexa Mini LF/MINI Cage The new Tilta camera cage is made out of high-quality aluminum, CNC-milled protective … Continued

The post New Tilta Camera Cage for Alexa Mini LF/MINI & Trade In Deal appeared first on Newsshooter.

Subway Mouse Fight Wins People’s Choice for Wildlife Photographer of the Year

The Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition just named the winner of this year’s LUMIX People’s Choice Award, and the perfectly-timed photo by wildlife filmmaker and photographer Sam Rowley is just too good to keep to ourselves.

Selected from over 48,000 submitted images and 25 impressive finalists, Rowley’s winning photo is called “Station Squabble,” and it features two mice getting into a tussle over some leftover crumbs in the London Underground.

While this might look like a random, lucky shot, it was actually the result of quite a bit of patience. According to Rowley, he visited multiple subway platforms every night for a week hoping to capture the perfect moment. The shot itself captures a scuffle that lasted no more than a split-second before one of the mice scurried away the victor.

“I’m so pleased to win this award. It’s been a lifetime dream to succeed in this competition in this way, with such a relatable photo taken in such an everyday environment in my hometown,” says Rowley. “I hope it shows people the unexpected drama found in the most familiar of urban environments.”

In addition to Sam’s image, the LUMIX People’s Choice Awards also recognized four “highly commended” images from the 25 finalists, which you can see below:

© Aaron Gekoski – Wildlife Photographer of the Year – Highly Commended
© Michel Zoghzoghi – Wildlife Photographer of the Year – Highly Commended
© Martin Buzora – Wildlife Photographer of the Year – Highly Commended
© Francis De Andres – Wildlife Photographer of the Year – Highly Commended

In order, the above shots include: Aaron Gekoski’s thought-provoking portrait of an Orangutan being exploited for performance, Michel Zoghzhogi’s picture of a mother jaguar and her cub carrying a captured anaconda, Martin Buzora’s portrait of a conservation ranger and the baby black rhino he protects, and Francis De Andres’s almost pure-white shot of a group of arctic reindeer.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London. To learn more about the competition, head over to the WPY website.


Image credits: All photos used courtesy of the Natural History Museum

Using User Files and All Files to Speed Up Switching Modes on the FX9.

Sometimes changing modes or frame rates on the FX9 can involve the need to change several settings. For example if you want to go from shooting Full Frame 6K at 23.98fps to shooting 120fps then you need to change the sensor scan mode before you can change the frame rate. One way to speed up this process is to use User Files or All Files to save your normal operating settings. Then instead of going through pages of menu settings you just load the appropriate file.

All Files save just about every single adjustable setting in the camera, everything from you white balance settings to LUT’s to Network settings to any menu customisations.  User Files save a bit less. In particular User Files can be set so that they don’t change the white balance. For this reason for things like changing the scan mode and frame rate I prefer to use User Files.

You can add the User File and/or All File menu items to the user menu. If you place them at the top of the user menu, when you enter the cameras menu system for the first time after powering it on they will be the very first items listed.

Both User Files and All Files are found under the “project” section in the FX9 menu system. The files are saved to an SD card in the SD Card Utility slot. This means you can easily move them from one camera to another.

Before you save a file, first you have to give it a name. I recommend that your name includes the scan mode, for example “FF6K” or “2KS35”, the frame rate and whether it’s CineEI or not.

Then save your file to the SD card. When loading a User File the “load customize data” option determines whether the camera will load any changes you have made to the user menu. “Load white data” determines whether the camera will load and overwrite the current white balance setting with ones saved in the file. When loading an All File the white balance and any menu customizations are always loaded regardless, so your current white balance setting will be overwritten by whatever is in the All File. You can however choose whether to load any network user names and passwords.


Using User Files and All Files to Speed Up Switching Modes on the FX9. was first posted on February 11, 2020 at 9:55 pm.
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Need Upbeat, Comedic-Style Lighting? Try High-Key

This simple high-key lighting setup is perfect for projects that need to look bright and happy.

When we talk about “high-key lighting,” that means you’re lighting a film, TV show, or photograph with low contrast. Simply put, the lighting ratio between your key light and your fill light is reduced in the shot. Your image looks very even, and there are no hard shadows and little contrast.

High-key lighting was used a lot in early Hollywood to accommodate film that didn’t handle high-contrast ratios well. It typically utilized the three-point lighting setup, which could be done efficiently throughout a project.

Now, high-key lighting is seen a lot in comedic TV and film because it creates a bright, happy look in projects and helps the talent pop on screen.

Rubidium Wu of PremiumBeat recently created a simple high-key lighting shot to demonstrate what you should consider when you try this in your own projects. Take a look at the video below!

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Yosemite Says Horsetail Fall Has ‘Little to No Water’ Ahead of Annual Firefall

The National Park Service is warning that Yosemite’s famous Horsetail Fall may not deliver for this year’s natural “Firefall.” Though the park is preparing for an influx of photographers by implementing significant restrictions, an alert on the NPS site says the fall has “little to no water” right now.

The annual “Firefall” happens in mid-February when the sunset lines up just right to make Horestail Fall look like it’s on fire. Assuming enough snowmelt and the right weather conditions, photographers can capture spectacular photos like this one:

Photo by Cedric Letsch, CC0

In recent years the event has drawn international attention, leading large crowds of photographers to flock to the area and struggle to find a spot from which to take their pictures. This year, the Firefall is expected to be visible for the two weeks between February 13th and 27th, and the park is already preparing to deal with the crowds.

As a result of last year’s debacle—more than 2,000 visitors flooded the park, trampling sensitive areas and leaving some spots littered with trash—Yosemite is implementing new restrictions on traffic, parking, and park access in general.

Between the hours of Noon and 7pm daily between February 13th and 27th, a large swath of the park will be closed off entirely to prevent erosion and trampling of sensitive vegetation, and all visitors will need to park 1.5 miles away and walk to the area along one of two routes. Closed areas “will be monitored to ensure compliance.”

You can read the full restrictions on the NPS site, or see them summarized in the infographic below:

But all of this may be for naught. While photographers will no doubt still try their luck, as of this morning, there is an alert posted to the Horsetail Fall webpage that warns would-be photographers that “Horsetail Fall has little to no water.”

The warning provides no further detail, but with only two days left until the “start” of the event, landscape photographers who want to catch the Firefall will need to keep their fingers crossed.


Image credits: Header photos by National Park Service and Cedric Letsch, CC0

Samsung announces S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones with up to 108MP capture and 8K video

Samsung took the stage at its Galaxy Unpacked 2020 event to unveil its latest Galaxy smartphone lineup, which includes the Galaxy Z Flip, Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra.

Let’s start by talking about the new S20 lineup.

Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra

Samsung’s S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones all vary in size and specifications, with increasing screen sizes and capabilities, respectively.

Before diving into the differences though, let’s take a look at what all of the devices share. The first thing you’ll notice is the familiar design, with the S20 lineup constructed of glass on the front and back with an aluminum alloy metal band around the edges. Aside from a slight bump up in weight and height compared to the S10 lineup, the only major visual difference from the device’s respective predecessors is a new camera bump that’s now rectangular in design.

Each of the new devices features a 120Hz OLED display, currently putting them at the front of the pack in terms of refresh rates (for OLEDs, at least). The S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra all have the same resolution (3200×1440 pixels), but the screen sizes across the devices do differ: 6.2-inches, 6.7-inches and 6.92-inches, respectively.

Moving onto the cameras, the S20 devices drop the dual-front-facing camera the S10 series had and opts for a single 10-megapixel camera on the S20 and S20+, while the S20 Ultra gets a ridiculous 40-megapixel front-facing camera. On the back of the devices, you’ll notice each model features increasingly-larger camera units, with more modules available on the larger models. The S20 has a 12-megapixel main sensor, a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, and a 64-megapixel 3x telephoto camera.

Below is a video breakdown from Android Central showing how the new camera systems work on the S20 lineup:

The S20+ has all of those cameras as well as a time-of-flight (ToF) camera for depth data. As you might expect, the S20 Ultra takes the entire setup to a whole other level; it offers a 108-megapixel main camera, a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, a 48-megapixel 10x telephoto (which is being marketed as a 100x ‘Space Zoom’ camera thanks to a unique combination of optical and digital zoom with a little AI magic tossed in there for good measure) and a ToF camera. All of the phones feature 8K video recording.

The S20 models are all IP68 water-resistant, include wireless charging and feature an in-screen ultrasonic fingerprint reader. Oh, and the headphone jack is gone.

The S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra are set to ship in the United States for $1000, $1,200 and $1,400, respectively.

Galaxy Z Flip

The Galaxy Z Flip is a second-generation folding phone from Samsung. Unlike the Galaxy Fold, which opened up side-to-side like a book, the Galaxy Z Flip opens up vertically, similar to clamshell-style phones of yesteryear.

However, instead of a keyboard at the bottom and a screen at the top as was standard nearly a decade ago, the Galaxy Z Flip features a 6.7-inch AMOLED display, which folds along the hinge of the phone. What’s interesting is that instead of the plastic being used for the screen, Samsung is instead using an ultra-thin glass—this should help to make the screen much more durable than its predecessor, which quickly gained a bad reputation for scratching easily.

The outside of the device also features a 1.06-inch secondary display that can display the current time, show the battery status, show notifications and even be used as a screen for taking selfies using the exterior camera.

Beneath the screen is an array of components that, as noted by Android Authority, are almost identical to those found inside the Galaxy S10e. Specifically, the phoen is powered by a Snapdragon 855 Plus SoC, 8GB of RAM, 256GB UFS 3.0 storage and a 3,300mAh battery (2,000mAh more than the S10e).

The pair of cameras on the rear of the device include a standard 12-megapixel camera and an ultra-wide 12-megapixel camera, while the front-facing selfie camera is 10-megapixels. The device also features 15W wired charging, 9W wireless charging and a side-mounted fingerprint sensor.

The Galaxy Z Flip will be available in Mirror Purple, Mirror Black and Mirror Gold (in select countries) starting February 14, 2020 for $1,380.

Samsung announces Galaxy Z Flip, S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones

Samsung took the stage at its Galaxy Unpacked 2020 event to unveil its latest Galaxy smartphone lineup, which includes the Galaxy Z Flip, Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra.

Galaxy Z Flip

Before diving into the more standard S20 lineup from Samsung, let’s first take a look at the Galaxy Z Flip, a second-generation folding phone from Samsung. Unlike the Galaxy Fold, which opened up side-to-side like a book, the Galaxy Z Flip opens up vertically, similar to clamshell-style phones of yesteryear.

However, instead of a keyboard at the bottom and a screen at the top as was standard nearly a decade ago, the Galaxy Z Flip features a 6.7-inch AMOLED display, which folds along the hinge of the phone. What’s interesting is that instead of the plastic being used for the screen, Samsung is instead using an ultra-thin glass—this should help to make the screen much more durable than its predecessor, which quickly gained a bad reputation for scratching easily. The outside of the device also features a 1.06-inch secondary display that can display the current time, show the battery status, show notifications and even be used as a screen for taking selfies using the exterior camera.

Beneath the screen is an array of components that, as noted by Android Authority, are almost identical to those found inside the Galaxy S10e. Specifically, the phoen is powered by a Snapdragon 855 Plus SoC, 8GB of RAM, 256GB UFS 3.0 storage and a 3,300mAh battery (2,000mAh more than the S10e).

The pair of cameras on the rear of the device include a standard 12-megapixel camera and an ultra-wide 12-megapixel camera, while the front-facing selfie camera is 10-megapixels. The device also features 15W wired charging, 9W wireless charging and a side-mounted fingerprint sensor.

The Galaxy Z Flip will be available in Mirror Purple, Mirror Black and Mirror Gold (in select countries) starting February 14, 2020 for $1,380.

Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra

With the flagship flip phone out of the way, let’s talk about the new S20 lineup. Similar to in the past, Samsung’s S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones all vary in size and specifications, with increasing screen sizes and capabilities, respectively.

Before diving into the differences though, let’s take a look at what all of the devices share. The first thing you’ll notice is the familiar design, with the S20 lineup constructed of glass on the front and back with an aluminum alloy metal band around the edges. Aside from a slight bump up in weight and height compared to the S10 lineup, the only major visual difference from the device’s respective predecessors is a new camera bump that’s now rectangular in design.

Each of the new devices features a 120Hz OLED display, currently putting them at the front of the pack in terms of refresh rates (for OLEDs, at least). The S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra all have the same resolution (3200×1440 pixels), but the screen sizes across the devices do differ: 6.2-inches, 6.7-inches and 6.92-inches, respectively.

Moving onto the cameras, the S20 devices drop the dual-front-facing camera the S10 series had and opts for a single 10-megapixel camera on the S20 and S20+, while the S20 Ultra gets a ridiculous 40-megapixel front-facing camera. On the back of the devices, you’ll notice each model features increasingly-larger camera units, with more modules available on the larger models. The S20 has a 12-megapixel main sensor, a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, and a 64-megapixel 3x telephoto camera.

Below is a video breakdown from Android Central showing how the new camera systems work on the S20 lineup:

The S20+ has all of those cameras as well as a time-of-flight (ToF) camera for depth data. As you might expect, the S20 Ultra takes the entire setup to a whole other level; it offers a 108-megapixel main camera, a 12-megapixel ultra-wide, a 48-megapixel 10x telephoto (which is being marketed as a 100x ‘Space Zoom’ camera thanks to a unique combination of optical and digital zoom with a little AI magic tossed in there for good measure) and a ToF camera. All of the phones feature 8K video recording.

The S20 models are all IP68 water-resistant, include wireless charging and feature an in-screen ultrasonic fingerprint reader. Oh, and the headphone jack is gone.

The S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra are set to ship in the United States for $1000, $1,200 and $1,400, respectively.