The cinematography of Jojo Rabbit

On the latest Go Creative Show podcast, host Ben Concoli talks to the DP of Jojo Rabbit, Mihai Malaimare Jr. Jojo Rabbit is a film by writer-director Taika Waititi (THOR: RAGNAROK, HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE). The film is a World War II satire that follows a lonely German boy (Roman Griffin Davis as JoJo) whose … Continued

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Panalux Sonara 4:4 – Variable White 4×4′ Fixture with 5,000 Lux Output

Panalux Sonara 4:4 is a new 4×4′ light fixture with variable white light output between 1,750K and 20,000K with advanced green/magenta control. Light output is 5,000 Lux at 3 meters with high TLCI of 96+. It is dimmable from 0 to 100% and can be controlled via DMX or detachable controller. Panalux Sonara also offers built-in library of select LEE Filters gels. It will be available in April through Panalux for rent only.

Panalux Sonara 4:4 Light. Image credit: cinema5D

Panalux is a part of Panavision. They offer mostly lighting rental equipment and associated facilities. Their head office is located in London, United Kingdom. Further, they have offices in the Czech Republic, France, and South Africa. Panalux recently announced a new large 4×4′ light fixture called Sonara. During BSC Expo 2020 in London, Nino talked with Dave from Panalux about this new light.

Panalux Sonara 4:4

Panalux Sonara is a 4×4′ light fixture which offers variable white light output between 1,750K and 20,000K. It is aimed at cinematographers who are looking for large white light sources. Light output is 5,000 Lux at 3 meters with high TLCI of 96+. The light spill can be controlled by a detachable grid. The light is dimmable from 0% to 100% with a 0.1% accuracy.

Panalux Sonara 4:4 Light. Image credit: cinema5D

The fixture can be remotely controlled with the detachable controller. It offers native wireless DMX, ArtNet or industry-standard DMX512. Multiple lights can also be daisy-chained with either DMX connection or by setting up Master and Slave units. It is also possible to combine more of these lights together in one giant light source via M12 bolts in each corner of every fixture.

Included as standard with every kit is a custom-designed softbox with tailored diffusion textiles, including quarter, half, and full grid cloth, as well as super soft magic cloth and a Snapgrid fabric egg-crate. The light is flicker-free, which has been tested to 5,000fps. It also offers built-in LEE Filters Gel library.

Panalux Sonara 4:4 Light. Image credit: cinema5D

Panalux Sonara 4:4 Specifications

  • Light Aperture (mm): 1196 x 1196
  • CCT Range: 1750K – 20000K
  • Beam Angle: 120°
  • Protection Rating: IP20
  • Mounting: Stirrup with 28mm Spigot / M12 Fixings
  • Power Supply Input: 110-240V 50/60Hz
  • Power Input Connector: Neutrik powerCON TRUE1
  • Control: Local / DMX / Artnet / CRMX
  • Wireless Control: Lumenradio CRMX Native
  • Cased Dimensions: 1564 x 1760 x 666
  • Weight: 39kg (without Stirrup)
  • Dimensions (mm): 1248 x 1248 x 135
  • Power Draw: 1,500W
  • Lux @ 3M (3200K): 5,000
  • Lux @ 3M (5600K): 5,000
  • TLCI: 95.5
  • CRI: 96.3
  • SSI: 82

Panalux Sonara 4:4 Light Photometrics. Source: Panalux

Availability for Renting

The Panalux Sonara 4:4 will be available in April 2020. The light fixture cannot be purchased – it will be offered for rent directly through Panalux. The day-rate has not been disclosed yet.

What do you think of Panalux Sonara 4:4 light fixture? Do you use large fixtures on your film sets? Let us know in the comments underneath the article.

The post Panalux Sonara 4:4 – Variable White 4×4′ Fixture with 5,000 Lux Output appeared first on cinema5D.

Five Major Movie Studios Ink Deals With Kodak, Keep Film Alive

Five Major Movie Studios Ink Deals With Kodak, Keep Film Alive

You might think that of all places, the big budget studios of Hollywood would have switched over to totally digital workflows by now, but surprisingly, that is not the case. In fact, five of the largest studios in Hollywood recently inked deals with Kodak for more film, ensuring its usage for years to come.

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As a Beginner, Should You Offer Free Shoots to Build Your Portfolio?

As a Beginner, Should You Offer Free Shoots to Build Your Portfolio?

When you are new to photography or videography, it can be a bit tough to get clients to give you a chance, which might lead you to wonder if you should offer your services for free. This quick and helpful video discusses why it might be beneficial to do a few free shoots to build out your portfolio a bit.

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Why You Should Copy Other Photographers

Why You Should Copy Other Photographers

It might seem like a strange idea to encourage people to copy other photographers, but there can be a huge benefit in doing so, particularly for newer photographers. This excellent video discusses why you might want to take time to emulate other photographers more often.

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How to Spot a Photography Scam

How to Spot a Photography Scam

Scams are nothing new to photographers, but scammers are getting cleverer and more thorough. A scammer who targeted me in November was the most convincing one I’ve had yet. I’m going to share the scammer’s emails and the clues that gave him away.

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How I Went About Getting Proper Permission for a Bridge Shoot

How I Went About Getting Proper Permission for a Bridge Shoot

Sometimes, getting the shot you want requires a lot more than simply pressing the shutter. I took a reasonable approach with little expectations and ended up with a small success story and some great shots.

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Fujifilm Drops Ambassador After His Street Shooting Style Sparks Outcry

Fujifilm has apparently dropped ambassador Tatsuo Suzuki from its X Photographer program after Suzuki’s “in your face” street photography shooting style sparked controversy over the past week.

It all started after Fujifilm announced the new X100V and released a series of videos showing photographers using the camera. One of them featured street photographer Tatsuo Suzuki:

As you can see, Suzuki captures his street photos in a way similar to renowned photographer Bruce Gilden, who walks up to strangers on sidewalks, points a camera (and often an off-camera flash) directly in their face, and shoots photos of them without warning and permission.

Gilden has made a name for himself through his shooting style (which is arguably more intrusive and offensive than Suzuki’s) and the results it produces, but much of Gilden’s work is done on the streets of New York City — Suzuki is based in Tokyo, and Japanese culture is known for valuing qualities such as politeness, quietness, and respectfulness.

As the controversy over the promo video grew, Fujifilm responded by quickly and quietly taking the video down (the video above is a mirror that popped up after the removal).

Fast-forward a few days, and today Fuji Rumors just spotted that Suzuki has been removed from the roster of X-Photographers on the program’s website. His dedicated page on the site is now coming up blank, but a cached version is still online (for now).

A screenshot of Tatsuo Suzuki’s former page on the X-Photographers website.



It’s curious that Suzuki was apparently removed from the ambassador program due to a video that Fujifilm released, but what has transpired behind the scenes between Fujifilm and Suzuki isn’t currently known.

We’ve reached out to both Fujifilm and Suzuki for comment and will update this article if/when we hear back. You can find Suzuki’s work on his website and Instagram.

65 Super Bowl Commercials, 2 Oscar-Nominated Shorts, and Some Tough-Love Filmmaking Advice

Bryan Buckley, who’s called ‘the King of the Super Bowl,’ gives some real-world advice about breaking into commercial directing.

Bryan Buckley is the King of the Super Bowl. At least, that’s what the New York Times dubbed him, along with “the 30-second auteur.” They’re fitting monikers—Buckley has helmed more than 65 Super Bowl commercials. His spot this year is for Hyundai, starred John Krasinski and Chris Evans. He’s highly regarded across the industry for his gift for casting first-time actors, his eye for detail, and his intrepid spirit.

Buckley has parlayed his commercial success into multiple features and two Oscar-nominated shorts. One of them, the devastating Saria, is nominated this year. (Stay tuned for an article publishing tomorrow with interviews from this year’s Oscar-nominated shorts directors, including Buckley.)

No Film School sat down with Buckley to discuss why he thinks first-time filmmakers shouldn’t jump at the first opportunity to make a feature, why shorts are better calling cards than commercial spots, and how he maintains his vision while working with clients.

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