If you have an AXS-CR1, you need to update the firmware.

A firmware bug has been identified with the Sony AXS-CR1 AXS and SXS card reader that can result in the corruption of the data on a card when performing concurrent data reads. To ensure this does not happen you should update the firmware of your AXS-CR1 immediately. 

For more information please see the post linked below on the the official Sony Cine website where you will find instructions on how to perform the update and where to download the necessary update files.

https://sonycine.com/articles/sony-axs-ar1-firmware-update—do-this-now/


If you have an AXS-CR1, you need to update the firmware. was first posted on November 27, 2019 at 3:41 pm.
©2018 “XDCAM-USER.COM“. Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at contact@xdcam-user.com

Save $150 off Joey Wrights Swimwear Photography Tutorial

Save $150 off Joey Wrights Swimwear Photography Tutorial

Fstoppers Black Friday sale is in full swing and we’re offering a 50% discount on Joey Wright’s “Swimwear Photography – Lighting, Posing, and Retouching“. For the next few days only, you can save $150 by using code “BF2019” at checkout.

[ Read More ]

Hilarious, Mesmerizing Images as “Grab life by the….!” Wins the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Hilarious, Mesmerizing Images as

I challenge you to look at these incredible images and not be blown away and wonderfully amused at the same time. The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards have been run and won for 2019 and there were some outstanding entries that deserve your attention and your laughter.

[ Read More ]

Sony a6600 review: Amazing autofocus, acceptable ergonomics

Introduction

Sample photoSample photoSample photoSample photoSample photo

The Sony a6600 is the company’s top-of-the-line APS-C mirrorless camera, with 24MP of resolution and 4K video capture. It looks a lot like Sony’s other a6000-series models at first glance, but this one has the biggest battery and the best build quality of the bunch, even if the images it produces are broadly comparable to the less expensive options.

The a6600 further differentiates itself by offering in-body image stabilization, which is still a rarity among APS-C cameras. This should help with stills shooting in low light, to be sure, but also combines with excellent autofocus tracking to make it the best crop-sensor video shooter Sony currently sells.

Despite its refinements, we still think the a6600 could benefit from some ergonomic updates to make it an easier camera to take control over.

Key features:

  • 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • Advanced, capable subject-tracking autofocus
  • In-body image stabilization
  • 2.36M dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • 0.9M dot tilting touchscreen
  • Wi-Fi for image transfer, and NFC
  • 4K video capture with log profiles
  • USB charging
  • 810-shot battery life (per CIPA)

The Sony a6600 will be available on November 29th, 2019, at a suggested price of $1400/€1600 body-only, and $1800/€2000 with an 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 kit lens.


What’s new, how it compares

Check out how the a6600 stacks up against its closest competition here.

Read more

Image quality

The a6600’s familiar sensor produces clean, pleasing images in a wide range of situations.

Read more

Autofocus and performance

With an industry-leading autofocus implementation, the a6600 is a capable sports-and-action shooter, but we have some reservations.

Read more

Video

Oversampling 4K footage from 6K capture, the a6600 churns out really detailed video footage, but rolling shutter remains a problem.

Read more

Conclusion

The a6600 is a supremely capable camera, but it just misses out on earning our top award – find out why.

Read more

Sample galleries

Check out some of our samples from across North America in our a6600 sample galleries.

Read more

10 Great Movies About Femenine and Subversive Fantasy

Far from traditional narrative, there is a cinema which subverts all conventionalism. With a vibrant sense of freedom, defend its own rules.

We are talking about fairytales, romantic dreams and paradises that later get lost on to cold nightmares, full of danger and mystery, where the loss of innocence is portrayed.

These young ladies, wander around, searching for a game to entertain themselves or something for discover: a creepy mansion, a desert landscape, the train tracks of a ruined city or just a way to get lost onto fantasy.

Childhood is the main weapon of these characters to create parallel worlds where they can shelter from adulthood’s decadence. Although they are not out. Sometimes they fall into the trap, to the hole as Alice did, and get exposed to hypocrisy, corruption, abuse, addictions, lies, waste and war emodied by monsters, mud beings, dead who revive, nymphs, witches, vampyres and ghosts.

The feminine becomes a performance, through a deceitful inoccence that hides, in the background, the empowerment of sensitivity in a world ruled by men’s logic. The random and the magical take over this femenine world.

There is no doubt that we are in front of an avant-garde cinema, which confronted its times. These “open” stories are full of hidden symbols in themselves that give us infinite interpretations. Many use surrealism as a mockery of political oppression just to hide themes that later could be banned. Others play with surrealism to fight against the boring reality of everyday life and show us the richness of imagination in a dream world.

Some of these movies were made with scenarios of wars and tyrannies behind or were misunderstood by critics for being too provocative. Daisies was banned 20 years by the communist in Czechoslovakia. Jodorowsky was almost killed at the premiere of Fando and Lis. Hausu pretended to be a Japanese version of Spielberg’s Jaws and ended up being a script based on the ideas of the director’s daughter, Zazie in the Subway was born from a last minute decision of the director and it was a risk because was based in a novel with really complex language.

 

1. Daisies (1969, Vera Chytilova)

“If the whole world is corrumpted, we will be too”. Under this premise, the film begins. While the two female sunbathe on a roof, war explotions occur in parallel. These two daisies share a symbiotic relationship where they do everyting together. Whimiscal and irreverent, eating pickles and watermelon in a grassy room, they play phone jokes and cut out magazines.They get out with older men to take advantage of their money and eat for free until they are satisfied.

Then just pretend they must take a train and end up sending the man away to repeat the story again and again. They are liars, they change names and invent diseases. Go round taking tubs of milk, wondering the meaning of existence. But, often, as a good child, they feel bored and declare that there is nothing. Finally, they enter a palace where they were not even invited and found a banquet. Putting slowly their fingers in cakes, pretend to be carefull, but then they hang on the big lamps, they dance on the table, step on the food and end up throwing and breaking plates.

Daisies mimic the bad behaviours of the world, playing to be amoral. With an experimental treatment that combines color, black and white and twist monochromes, in a collage technique of edition, with a breaking narrative, we can find slapstick, dadaist style, different speeds and magical ellipsis, that represent a childish spirit.

From the words of its own director, the film is a moral tale about the destruction, showing how evil does not necessarily manifest itself in an orgy of destruction caused by war, that its roots may be hidden in the malicious joke of daily life.

 

2. Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1974, Jaromil Jires)

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970)

Valerie, an angelic-looking girl, wanders through a gothic village subject to extreme religion.

In a mythical and poethic tone, she wanders through edenic landscapes with white scenarios that are abruptly interrumped by dark vampires wishing her young blood.

A daisy is stained with blood and we know, symbolically, that Valerie is already a woman, who loses her attention in a beautiful pair of earrings (that represent her virginity), while grandmother forces her to pray. It seems that Valerie is not innocent anymore because of the way she eat fruits and because she has already spied lesbians having orgies and has seen punishment like a sexual delight.

In the midst of her sexual awakening, Valerie will be exposed to taboos, where the dialecthic between guilt and desire, fear and curiosity get harder.

This is a bizarre version of Alice in Wonderland, a perverted fairytale, where innocence and virginity play with its darkest counterpart: obscenity, abuse and incest. An allegory of the end of childhood or maybe, it’s just Valerie’s dream.

 

3. Fando and Lis (1968, Alejandro Jodorowsky)

Fando & Lis (1967)

Jodorowsky’s cinema has always sought to provoke and this is not exception. Fando and Lis walk their love through demolished buildings, cemeteries, chasms, marshes in a random journey through the search of a mythical city called Tar. Lis is paralyzed and carried by Fando, through this violent world where snakes enter the vaginas, where some beg for blood, where they jump and dance on corpses.

This teatrical nightmare, in a dystopic world full of subconsciousness, show us death, abuse, dependence, punishment, sick love, idealization, selfishness, sacrilege and trauma.

All the cities crumbled and the only hope is Tar, a place where “you know wine and water, play with a music box, help harvest, know eternity, become a cat, a child, a swan, and you will be alone and you will get love and you will find extasy”.

“If the city doesn’t exist, we invent it” said Lis. But Tar does not exist in a dehumanized era.

 

4. Zazie in The Subway (1960, Louis Malle)

Zazie-dans-le-metro

Zazie, a capricious and burlesque young woman, insolent but not innocent, spends time disturbing others. She run away from her uncle’s house in search of adventures, wanting to explore Paris by her own, meeting strangers and then escaping through absurd persecutions.

Under the spell of strident violins, fast-speed images, jumpcuts, magical ellipsis, slapstick and a satured photography we know Zazie’s fantasy world. But while she sleeps, the dark and destroyed world of adult is portrayed.

A world who started to industrialize, with traffics everywhere, consumer society, misogyny, false appearances and obssesed love. It hides a strong social criticism of stupid masses, fighting each other, breaking and destroying without reasons, scenarios that fall, the futility of life, dynamites exploding and everyone applaud in midst of chaos. Paris is dressed of modernism and great architecture, but in a post war mood, we can find existentialist crisis.

Zazie has an adult and challenging psychology in this world ruled by clumsy adults. She recounts her childhood’s traumas, as if she didn’t care of it. Her perspective of good and evil is twisted. She is just the result of a world that has lost its values.

 

5. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming)

Dorothy is a Kansas girl who will leave the black and white desert, through a tornado, to inmerse herself in the amazing Technicolor world of Oz. Munchkins and witches will help her to find her way back home with one clue: “Follow the yellow path”. With the help of three eclectic partners (the scarecrow, the tinman and the coward lion), she will go in search for the Wizard to find her way back home. Beyond the rainbow, they will found witches appearing from smog, trees that talks, garden of poppies that make you sleep, flying monkeys and tramps.

But this film is not just fantasy. In the time it was written, fascist dictators dominated Europe. Everyone praises any authority figure just for having carisma, technology is a mechanism used to dominate, a society with deep ignorance can be manipulated, industry doesn’t have a heart, politicans are coward, drugs are the perfect anesthesia for dominate people. But Dorothy was just having a bad dream they say. Nothing exists but on her mind.

Wizard of Oz is a story of marginal beings, of misfits who don’t fit the social stereotypes. And it’s also a girl that had to leave the repressive home and go out into the unknown in a struggle with her maturity. The world begins in the end of your comfort zone.

Turning Inwards: GoaPhoto 2019

Turning Inwards: GoaPhoto 2019

Goa Photo

For its third edition, a festival in western India explores relationships with the private, the interior, the domestic and even voyeuristic impulses.

In 2015, for its first edition, GoaPhoto occupied a very different conceptual framework. The international photo festival was devised to take place in public spaces using large formats, with the intention of interacting with the storied heritage of Panjim, the capital city of Goa. While the curatorial team of Spanish photographer Frank Kalero, Indian photographer Ishan Tankha and Goa-based editor and curator Lola Mac Dougall were thrilled with the success and scale of their debut festival, they did encounter certain restrictions in this frame.

Diaspora. © Cecile Smetana Baudier, image courtesy of the artist and GoaPhoto

“We found that it privileged certain ways of looking at photographs, it defined the type of photography that could be shown—there are photographic projects and pursuits that simply don’t work in large formats, and others that are of a sensitive nature and couldn’t be showcased in public spaces,” explains Mac Dougall. “We also felt that maintaining this scale and continued commitment couldn’t be done without the support of the state government, which was really missing, and didn’t seem forthcoming at the time,” she adds.

How then could GoaPhoto evolve differently for the future? How could it go on in another way? It started off as a joke over a lunch between photographers: let’s domesticate photography! On further interrogating that idea, they realized that it had a lot of potential. “It suddenly made sense for a number of reasons. On the personal level, we live here. We inhabit these houses, we visit other people’s houses, and we’re constantly in contact with this atmosphere, these objects,” says Mac Dougall.

Paloma al aire. © Ricardo Cases, image courtesy of the artist and GoaPhoto

At the festival level, it was translated into their second edition, which took place in 2017. “We settled upon putting together a festival that allowed us to generate or showcase works that were in dialogue with interior spaces. And to resonate with this move, they left the capital city for the more idyllic but equally historic environs of Saligao, a village in North Goa.

“The originality of our proposal is that photography doesn’t always come first. Sometimes, the photographic work is exhibited as responses to the spaces presented to us,” she tells us. “For example, in Saligao’s Quinta Serena—a house built in 1835—there was a room with an iron wrought bed. It was very special as a space. I thought, I wouldn’t do anything with this room unless I found the right body of work to make it, to highlight it. And finally, Elisa Gonzales Miralles’s Wannabe, a work of Japanese dolls and Japanese women who imitate the aesthetic of the dolls came to me. In this series of portraits, sometimes you can’t tell who is the doll and who is the person,” she says. “In this manner, the final exhibitions at the festival have nothing to do with the ‘white cube’ of the gallery space. We also welcome these kinds of explorations of the interior and of interiority.”

Exhibition shot from GoaPhoto 2017 © Fabien Charuau for GoaPhoto

And turning inwards—a major theme of GoaPhoto—didn’t just change the way one experienced the festival: it began to dictate the curation of the works as well. “We thought that it would make sense to deal with photography that had some relationship with the private, the interior, the domestic and even voyeuristic impulses, which was important because it is reflected in the way that the festival is experienced because one walks through these ancient private homes of the residents,” Mac Dougall points out.

Our Life in the Shadows © Tania Franco Klein, image courtesy the artist and GoaPhoto

For the 2019 edition, which takes place between December 6-8, Akshay Mahajan, a Goa-based photographer, curator and writer has come on-board to share curation with Mac Dougall. This time the festival takes place in Aldona, another lovely village in North Goa, where its previous themes have been further fine-tuned through three propositions.

GoaPhoto will continue its exploration of the private and the domestic through a series of intimate projects including the psychological self-portraits of Indian photographer Pamela Singh taken in the village of Loutolim in South Goa, Mexican photographer Tania Franco Klein’s images which employs the feminine body to change the narrative of the American Dream, and the work of Swiss artist Anne Golaz, who will do a performative reading alongside a projection of twelve years of capturing her rural farm where she grew up. Other projects reflect on different traditions and iterations of home such as Ricardo Cases’ Dove Into The Air looks at the tradition of pigeon racing around his hometown, a woman’s metamorphosis into an itinerant house in Shivani Gupta’s Girl in a House and Edgar Martins’ What Photography & Incarceration have in Common with an Empty Vase speaks to the fictive tension between round-the-clock surveillance of prisoners and the absence of these very persons from their homes.

© Edgar Martins. Image courtesy of the artist and GoaPhoto

The theme of food and photography is another key ingredient of this year’s festival. In Austrian photographer Simon Bruegner’s The Arsenic Eaters, the polarization between food and poison is reframed by looking at the historical practice of arsenic consumption in Eastern Austria. Indian visual artist and ethnographer Rajyashri Goody’s Eat with Great Delight, a collection of her own family photographs showing joyful enjoyment of meals will also be exhibited in the same space.

Through a series of personal images, Rajyashri Goody seeks to undercut the narratives surrounding food and caste in India. Anshika Varma—Indian photographer, curator and artist—is the final response under the umbrella of this theme. She will showcase photographic works that stem from her curiosity in food and recipe books. At a parallel event that hints at this theme, The Edible Archives—a gastronomic project that sits at the intersection of food, memory and art—will host a farm-to-table communal meal using produce from Condillac Farm in Aldona.

Eat with Great Delight. © Rajyashri Goody, image courtesy of the artist and GoaPhoto

A continuation of co-curator Akshay Mahajan’s own personal passion with vernacular photography and its history in Goa has found a home in this edition. Mahajan collaborated with anthropologist Pedro Manuel Sobral Pombo of the Goa University to research personal narratives of people from Aldona, collect family photos and memorabilia, and engaged with them in two ways.

“Part of it is interpreted in a very ‘museum way’ where we look at these oral histories and find a way to illustrate them. The other part will involve myself and Portuguese artist Angela Berlinde, who will interpret sections of this collected archive to create new artwork that culminates in the exhibition, Aldona Through Family Eyes,” Mahajan explains. Portuguese artist Ana Janeiro and Brazilian photographer Helena Martins Costa will also showcase everyday photography sourced from their respective countries under this theme.

© D’Sa-Condillac family, image courtesy of GoaPhoto

In its latest avatar, curators of GoaPhoto Lola Mac Dougall and Akshay Mahajan continue to find ways to turn the lens towards the inner spaces of our homes and hearts. And situating itself in these villages, the festival invites participants to return, reflect and reminisce but also revise the certain easy narratives that cloud our modern minds. In choosing charm and history over glamour, GoaPhoto help us find our bearings of the past, and still make sense of our collective present.

Editor’s note: The 2019 edition of GoaPhoto will run from the 6th to 8th of December in Aldona, Goa. You can find out more about the program of events at the festival website.

Enjoy more great photography:

Desvio
Days at Lutholim, 2012
Diaspora

How to Get a Photography Agent

How to Get a Photography Agent

This is a question that I get asked all of the time. Getting a photography agent can really help you career, but getting one can be very tricky and there isn’t that much information out there to help.

[ Read More ]

Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2019

DPReview Awards 2019

If 2018 was the year that full-frame mirrorless went mainstream, 2019 was the year when all of the major manufacturers really doubled-down on their mirrorless strategies. Canon pumped out a series of very high quality RF lenses, alongside the world’s cheapest full-frame mirrorless camera. Nikon went all-in on its range of affordable F1.8 primes, and Sony pulled out all the stops – yet again – in the a7R IV.

Meanwhile, Olympus threw all of its technological know-how into the sports-oriented OM-D E-M1 X, Fujifilm reinvented medium-format with the GFX 100 and Ricoh’s GR III and Leica’s Q2 offered a welcome refresh for fans of fixed-focal length compacts.

That’s a lot, and it’s only a small taste of what happened this year. Every December we get together as a team to recognize the standout products of the past 12 months in our annual DPReview Awards. Take a look through the slides above to find out which products made our list of the best gear of 2019!

Best accessory

Shortlist:

  • DJI Osmo pocket
  • DJI Ronin SC
  • Gnarbox 2.0 SSD
  • Peak Design Travel Tripod

Runner up: Peak Design Travel Tripod

The role of photography accessories is to play support to your creative endeavors. That can mean support in the traditional sense, like a well-designed travel tripod or 3-axis gimbal rig. Or it can mean support in the form of peace of mind, like a rugged file back-up device.

Our runner-up for best photography accessory, the Peak Design Travel Tripod, falls into the former category. Travel tripods aren’t new, but Peak Design has managed to radically rethink the concept to create a package that’s significantly more compact than the competition and just as stable, if not more so. Its Arca Swiss-compatible, dual-locking ball head in particular is worth calling out for its clever low-profile design. Available in both aluminum and carbon fiber, this is the travel tripod we’ll likely be reaching for in 2020, whenever space is tight.

Read more about the Peak Design Travel Tripod

Winner: GNARBOX 2.0 SSD

The Gnarbox 2.0 brings calm to the often chaotic world of photography. It’s the friend in the field you always wanted: a rugged (weather, dust and impact-resistant) SSD (available in 256GB, 512GB and 1TB) with built-in SD reader and super-fast transfer speeds (up to 350MB/s). It’s there to protect all your precious data until you get it home for a full backup.

One-touch copying and an info LCD make it effortless to start transferring and confirm files have been properly duplicated. And for those eager to get ahead on their edits, Gnarbox will pair with a smart device so that you can sort and tag (using Photo Mechanic’s image engine). But that’s not all: Gnarbox also has swappable batteries and can even be used to charge other devices via a Micro-USB port. It’ll also play nice with Apple’s iPad Pro, with support for programs like Adobe Lightroom and Affinity Photo, when connected via its USB-C port. What more could you ask for?

Read more about the GNARBOX 2.0 SSD

Best smartphone camera

Shortlist:

  • Apple iPhone 11 Pro
  • Google Pixel 4
  • Huawei P30 Pro
  • Samsung Galaxy S10 5G

Runner up: Apple iPhone 11 Pro

The iPhone 11 Pro is a significant step forward for Apple, and from a pure experience standpoint, is the nicest smartphone camera to use today. Its bright screen combined with HDR playback of photos makes the on-device experience of shooting and enjoying photos industry-leading. And unlike any other smartphone camera to-date, iPhones since the iPhone X utilize the wide P3 color space, meaning more life-like color capture and rendition.

A new ultra-wide lens allows for dramatic perspectives, and wide angle portrait mode – utilizing the main camera module – makes it easy to shoot more intimate perspectives of your loved ones and pets, with better image quality than the standard portrait mode offers. Editing photos, depth effects, and video is pleasing thanks to the Photos app updates, and clever features like ‘capture outside the frame’ offer creative uses of the phone’s three lenses. Video quality is superb, with HDR capture up to 4K/60p.

We have some reservations over the warm and green-shifted colors, overly-processed faces from semantic rendering choices, significant lag in portrait mode, and image quality artifacts including banding, aggressive noise reduction and over-sharpening, but as an all-rounder, the iPhone 11 Pro is hard to beat.

Read more about the Apple iPhone 11 Pro

Winner: Google Pixel 4

The Pixel 4 offers compelling still image quality. If you shoot Night Sight – even during daylight hours – you’ll be rewarded with some of the best detail retention and balanced noise reduction we’ve seen from a smartphone. It only gets better in Raw, since the DNGs produced by the Pixel 4 are the result of aligning and merging multiple frames. A new astrophotography mode is not just cool but inspiring, and also benefits any nighttime scene where longer exposures can be used. The combination of super-res zoom and a new telephoto module make ‘zoomed in’ photos better than many peers. And unlike the iPhone, you can continue to use the telephoto module in dim light.

New ‘dual exposure controls’ allow you to fine tune the ‘look’ of the resulting HDR image in real-time. Portrait mode has been improved to yield bokeh similar to what you’d expect from ILCs, with fewer depth map errors and virtually no shutter lag. As such, the Pixel 4 is truly an enthusiast’s smartphone camera. We have reservations over its video quality, display, as well as certain metering and image processing choices, but its strong core competency in stills makes it our winner.

Read more about the Google Pixel 4

Best zoom lens

Shortlist:

  • Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM
  • Canon RF 24-70mm F2.8L IS USM
  • Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 S
  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm F1.7 ASPH
  • Sony E 16-55mm F2.8 G

Runner-up: Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 S

Every year we struggle to narrow down the number of lenses released to a shortlist of just four or five. This year saw a lot of action in the lens space, with both Canon and Nikon putting considerable energy into building out their native mirrorless lens lineup, and Sigma, Sony and Tamron doing the same.

One of the zoom lenses that has most impressed us this year is Nikon’s Z 24-70mm F2.8 S. Built for use in difficult conditions, the Z 24-70mm is tough and weather-sealed, but more than that, it’s optically outstanding. Sharp, virtually aberration-free and extremely flare-resistant, the Z 24-70mm F2.8 really lets Z7 shooters make the most out of their camera’s resolution, for anything from landscapes to portraiture.

Read more about the Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 S

Winner: Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM

We really, really like the Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM. It’s small (at 70mm), relatively lightweight, autofocus is lightning fast and silent, and its optical image stabilization system is excellent.

The 70-200mm represents the first time we’ve seen Nano USM technology incorporated in fast L-series glass, and the increase in focus speed is dramatic compared to ring-type USM on EF lenses. But perhaps the most impressive thing about this lens is its optical quality. Contrast and sharpness are class-leading wide open at all focal lengths, bokeh is smooth with no distracting patterns, and both longitudinal and lateral forms of chromatic aberration are very well controlled.

This is the most impressive 70-200mm F2.8 lens we’ve ever seen, in a surprisingly compact form factor, and a worthy winner of our award for best zoom lens of 2019.

Read more about the Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM

Best prime lens

Shortlist:

  • Tamron SP 35mm F1.4 Di USD
  • Sigma 35mm F1.2 DG DN | Art
  • Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM
  • Nikon Nikkor Z 85mm F1.8 S

Runner-up: Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM

There were so many great prime lenses released this year, and inevitably, it’s near-impossible to reduce the list to just four. This ‘shortlist’ could have been at least twice as long and we would still have had to omit some great lenses. But the primes listed above represent our favorites of 2019, not only because of their optical quality, but also their versatility and overall value for money.

Among the most impressive lenses of any type released this year was the Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM. Designed for portrait fans, the 135mm F1.8 is stunningly sharp and delivers beautiful images at its widest apertures. It’s virtually aberration free, and is the fastest-to-focus lens of its kind. Sony’s optical science has improved by leaps and bounds in recent years and the FE 135mm F1.8 is an excellent example of the company’s current state-of-the-art. While 135mm isn’t necessarily an everyday focal length, the Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM is arguably the best option on the market right now for portrait shooters.

Read more about the Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM

Winner: Nikon Nikkor Z 85mm F1.8 S

Nikon’s S-series prime lenses for the Z system have impressed us this year with their performance, not to mention their versatility and value. All sub-$1000 and all relatively small and lightweight, the best of Nikon’s new F1.8 options outperform many faster lenses that cost considerably more.

The Z 85mm F1.8 S is a great example. Sharp, virtually aberration-free and still nicely portable, this portrait prime isn’t as fast as some of its competitors, or as polished as (say) the Sony FE 135mm F1.8 which takes the runner-up spot, but it’s a supremely practical, useful lens. With its smooth bokeh, the Z 85mm F1.8 S is, of course, a fantastic portrait lens for Z6 and Z7 shooters, and a nifty 135mm equivalent on the APS-C Z50. But its size and weight, plus its superb sharpness make it just as useful for landscape and candid work.

Read more about the Nikon Nikkor Z 85mm F1.8 S

Best compact/fixed lens camera

Shortlist:

  • Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II
  • Leica Q2
  • Ricoh GR III
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

Runner-up: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

This is always a tricky category, spanning multiple sensor formats and including both zoom and fixed focal length lenses. This year saw the release of some very impressive – and very different – compact / fixed-lens compact cameras, from the high-end Leica Q2 to the more consumer-friendly Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II.

Despite their different shapes, sizes and prices, all of the cameras in this section cater to the same basic need: high quality imaging, in a compact form factor. Our runner-up this year is Sony’s best RX100-series camera yet. A small, powerful zoom with a high-quality EVF, great video and formidable autofocus, the RX100 VII is a near-perfect camera for travel and everyday photography and video. Inevitably it’s not cheap, but this kind of technology never is.

Read more about the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

Winner: Ricoh GR III

First announced in 2018, the GR III was released this year and quickly became one of our favorite compact cameras. Small and lightweight, but with a stabilized sensor and capable of stunning image quality the GR III is – like the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII – a wonderful camera for travel and everyday photography.

Yes, the lens is a fixed 28mm equivalent. No, the video mode isn’t great, but this is a pure photography camera, capable of getting you images that larger, heavier or more complicated models simply won’t.

Read more about the Ricoh GR III

Best consumer stills / video camera

Shortlist:

  • Fujifilm GFX 100
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H
  • Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

Runner up: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

While the RX100-series has always been primarily about stills photography, Sony has evolved its range of high-quality 1-inch sensor compacts into powerful video tools, as well. The Mark VII captures oversampled UHD 4K video, Full HD at up to 120 fps and lower resolution video with a top frame rate of almost 1000 fps. Unlike its predecessor, the RX100 VII has a built-in mic input.

In short: the RX100 VII offers excellent 4K video, very good autofocus and a handy built-in finder, making it exceptionally versatile for photographers that need to capture both stills and movie footage.

Read more about the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VII

Winner: Panasonic Lumix DC-S1

It might seem odd having both the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 and S1H on the same list, for best stills / video hybrid camera and have the S1 beat its more video-centric stablemate, but this is precisely the point. With the S1H in the pipeline, Panasonic didn’t need to make the S1 as good for video as it did, and it certainly didn’t need to make it even better with a paid firmware update.

With the paid update, the S1 becomes a formidable camera for video, even to the extent that the costlier S1H may prove unnecessary for many filmmakers. We’ve done a lot of shooting this year on the S1 and it’s an impressive machine from a manufacturer that perhaps more than any other, really knows how to do video right.

Read more about the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1

Best entry-level ILC

Shortlist:

  • Canon EOS M200
  • Fujifilm X-A7
  • Olympus PEN E-PL10
  • Sony a6100

Runner-up: Fujifilm X-A7

While a lot of attention gets paid to the high-end and professional market segments, often the most important cameras in a manufacturer’s lineup are at the entry-level. The reason they’re so important is that these are the products which – it is hoped – will attract new customers into a system.

The Fujifilm X-A7 is a significant camera for Fujifilm, and a great all-round option for beginner photographers in general. Significant for Fujifilm because it’s the company’s first entry-level offering that has really impressed us, and a great entry-level camera because it does exactly what a camera aimed at first-time buyers and smartphone upgraders should. It’s simple, streamlined, reliable and responsive, and can easily transition between stills and high-quality video.

Read more about the Fujifilm X-A7

Winner: Canon EOS M200

If there’s one thing Canon knows how to do it’s make an attractive, sensibly-designed entry-level ILC. The EOS M200 is the company’s latest, and while it doesn’t represent a massive upgrade compared to the M100, the changes are very welcome including one change in particular – Eye Detect autofocus. Assuming that a lot of us (and arguably most beginners) will take a lot of pictures of friends and family, the addition of eye detection to the M200’s autofocus mode really does make a big difference. Canon has also added 4K video capture and ‘CRaw’, for Raw format shooting without the massive file sizes.

Overall, the Canon EOS M200 doesn’t bring much to the table which is genuinely ‘new’ but its combination of features, easy to operate design, and reliable image quality make it a great entry-level ILC, and our favorite of 2019.

Read more about the Canon EOS M200

Best midrange ILC

Shortlist:

  • Canon EOS M6 Mark II
  • Fujifilm X-T30
  • Nikon Z50
  • Sony a6600

Runner-up: Nikon Z50

We define ‘midrange’ cameras as those transitional models between entry-level and enthusiast / pro which need to be able to work for inexperienced and more seasoned photographers alike.

Nikon’s first APS-C format mirrorless camera is also one of its most user-friendly. Intended to be picked up by first-time ILC buyers and smartphone upgraders, the Z50 is designed to be simple and straightforward to use, but isn’t ‘dumbed down’. Featuring a high-quality electronic viewfinder, twin control dials and photographer-friendly ergonomics, the Z50 is a camera that leaves plenty of room for a beginner to experiment and grow creatively.

Read more about the Nikon Z50

Winner: Canon EOS M6 Mark II

Canon has been making good, solid interchangeable lens cameras for a really long time, and this experience shows in products like the EOS M6 Mark II. A really great camera doesn’t need to do everything better than its competitors, it just has to do everything well enough, without getting in the way of your creativity.

The EOS M6 Mark II reaffirms Canon’s commitment to its compact, mirrorless EF-M system. After years of competent but usually beginner-focused models, the M6 II comes out swinging as a convincing option for more advanced users. Its new 32.5MP sensor has impressive resolution and dynamic range, the 14 fps maximum burst speed with autofocus is competitive, and its 4K video uses the full width of the sensor.

It doesn’t hands-down beat any of its competitors in any specific area, but as an all-around package, the M6 Mark II easily won us over for best midrange ILC of 2019.

Read more about Canon’s EOS M6 Mark II

Best high-end ILC

Shortlist:

  • Fujifilm GFX 100
  • Olympus OM-D E-M1X
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R
  • Sony a7R IV

Runner-up: Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R

The Lumix DC-S1R will tick a ton of boxes for a ton of photographers, which is all the more impressive given that it’s Panasonic’s first full-frame offering (alongside the lower-resolution DC-S1). It’s built like a tank and all of the buttons and dials feel like they’re in just the right place.

The 47MP sensor at the heart of the S1R isn’t class-leading at this point, but it’s still capable of producing excellent image quality in almost any situation. Unfortunately, the DC-S1R falls somewhat short in terms of autofocus and tracking. While it can drive focus very quickly using Panasonic’s DFD technology, it just can’t quite keep up with competitors’ on-sensor phase detection systems for accuracy when photographing moving subjects.

Read more about the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R

Winner: Sony a7R IV

The fourth iteration of Sony’s high-resolution mirrorless full-frame camera is the most capable, well-rounded interchangeable lens camera on the market today. It shoots 60.2MP files, offers industry-leading autofocus tracking, is capable of 10fps continuous bursts and shoots the best 4K video of any high-resolution camera you can buy. Plus, Sony claims weather-sealing has been improved, battery life is well above average and ergonomic tweaks have made it more comfortable and enjoyable to use than previous models.

The a7R IV is a camera that you really can shoot just about anything with, from action sports to billboard-ready landscapes, and because of that, it earns the distinction of being our high-end ILC of the year.

Read more about the Sony a7R IV

DPReview innovation award

Shortlist:

  • Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM
  • Fujifilm GFX 100
  • Olympus OM-D E-M1X
  • Peak Design Travel Tripod

Runner-up: Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM

Optically the RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM is stunning, but it’s also a marvel of engineering. At its short end, it collapses down to a barrel size not much longer than that of the RF 24-70mm F2.8L IS USM. At 1070g, it’s 26% lighter than its EF equivalent, and feels surprisingly light in one’s hands, and well-balanced on an EOS R body. Optical image stabilization offers an impressive CIPA rating of 5 stops. Combined with dual-sensing IS on EOS R bodies, you can expect tack sharp handheld shots on the long end at shutter speeds as low as 1/13s.

If that’s not innovative, we don’t know what is.

Read more about the Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM

Winner: Fujifilm GFX 100

While very little about the GFX 100 is new or unique to this model, what counts is how all the ingredients are mixed together. The addition of in-camera stabilization, impressive video capture and hybrid on-sensor PDAF to the medium format world makes the Fujifilm GFX 100 among the most capable and most innovative cameras out there.

Fujifilm has been working hard to democratize digital medium format for a couple of years, but with the 100 megapixel GFX 100, the company completely changed our understanding of what a medium format camera could be.

Read more about the Fujifilm GFX 100

DPReview product of the year, 2018

Shortlist:

  • Apple iPhone 11 Pro
  • Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM
  • Fujifilm GFX 100
  • Sony a7R IV

Runner-up: Fujifilm GFX 100

As we wrote in the previous slide, the GFX 100 really did turn our idea of what a medium format camera could do on its head. While the MSRP of almost ten grand puts it out of reach to most non-professional photographers, there is an audience out there for cameras like this, and Fujifilm has done a great job of catering to them.

Pro wedding and event photographers, portrait and lifestyle shooters, and even a certain type of videographer have kept the GFX 100 on more or less continuous backorder since it was released. You may not need 100MP, but some people do. And the GFX 100, with Fujifilm’s range of excellent GF lenses, makes 100MP shooting practical and enjoyable.

Read more about the Fujifilm GFX 100

Winner: Sony Alpha a7R IV

Sony is one of the more divisive brands on our site, partly because of a perception that it gets more attention than other manufacturers. This perception stems from two factors: firstly, Sony has released an astonishing number of high-end products in the past handful of years. Secondly, they have tended to be very good.

Taken as a whole, the a7R IV is Sony’s best mirrorless camera yet. The enthusiast-focused a7 III continues to top the best-seller lists but if you want the highest resolution, the best autofocus system and some of the best video features on the market (not just in Sony’s own product lineup) the a7R IV is where it’s at. A true ‘flagship’, the a7R IV has undoubtedly benefited this year from no direct competition from Canon or Nikon, but it’ll take an unusually good product from either manufacturer to make the a7R IV look uncompetitive in 2020.

Read more about the Sony a7R IV

DPReview TV: This is how you set up Sony’s ‘Real-Time’ autofocus tracking

Sony’s ‘Real-Time’ autofocus promises to track almost anything you throw at it, but it’s not enabled by default. The words ‘Real-Time’ don’t even appear in the camera’s menu. In this video, Chris shows us how to set up this very useful feature.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get new episodes of DPReview TV every week.

Olympus updates its lens roadmap with three new lenses due out in 2020

Olympus has released an updated version of its M.Zuiko Digital lens roadmap that adds three new lenses to its Micro Four Thirds System lineup.

In addition to its previously-announced lenses, the new roadmap confirms three new lenses: the ED 12-45mm F4.0 Pro standard zoom lens, ED 100-400mm F5.0-6.3 IS super-telephoto zoom lens and ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens super-telephoto zoom lens.

A product image from Olympus showing off the impending ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO super-telephoto zoom lens.

Olympus doesn’t elaborate further on any of the new lenses other than saying the detailed specifications will be ‘officially announced in 2020.’ Olympus also says an ‘additional PRO telephoto zoom lens of an unspecified focal length will also join the M.Zuiko family,’ although no timeframe is given for its release.

Red Giant Complete: all the Red Giant tools at one low price

Red Giant Complete: all the tools at one low price

Get access to every single tool Red Giant makes – Trapcode Suite, Magic Bullet Suite, Universe, VFX Suite and Shooter Suite -, for $599/year, compared to $3,495 if purchased separately.

Red Giant Complete for individuals, students and teachers expands the company’s licensing options, offering a subscription service that gives editors, motion designers and VFX artists all Red Giant tools at one low price – Trapcode Suite, Magic Bullet Suite, Universe, VFX Suite and Shooter Suite. With this package, “annual subscribers will have the most up-to-date versions of all tools, saving thousands of dollars over traditional perpetual licenses”, says Red Giant.

“Red Giant Complete has been available to our volume customers for years, with thousands of licenses in use at broadcast networks, film studios and universities. And now, due to popular demand, we’re really excited to offer subscription licensing to all of our customers,” says Chad Bechert, CEO of Red Giant. “At the same time, nothing has changed. While we think Red Giant Complete is an incredible deal, we know some customers are more comfortable buying software the traditional way. We want to make sure our community of talented artists has what it needs, so we’re continuing to offer perpetual licenses at their usual prices.”

The subscription model

If you think the subscription model is for you, get this solution. The subscription to all the tools is $599 a year for individuals or $299 for students and teachers. You get access to Trapcode Suite, Magic Bullet Suite, VFX Suite, Shooter Suite and Universe, all now available together, under this offer from Red Giant. According to the company, these are the benefits of Red Giant Complete:

  • All Access – gives artists full access to the complete set of Red Giant tools – including all four product suites and Universe.
  • Up-to-Date –  includes free upgrades, so users will always have the latest editing, motion graphics and VFX tools, the moment they are updated.
  • Big Savings – With this package, individuals, students and teachers will save thousands of dollars. Buying all Red Giant tools would normally cost $3,495. With subscription pricing it would take over 5 years to pay the same amount for perpetual licenses – and that wouldn’t include upgrade costs.

The Red Giant Complete includes:

  • Trapcode Suite (reg. $999): The industry’s most essential tools for creating 3D motion graphics and visual effects in Adobe After Effects, now with the Dynamic Fluids physics engine.
  • Magic Bullet Suite (reg. $899): Widely used for color correction, finishing and film looks, Magic Bullet Suite 13 gives editors and filmmakers everything needed to make footage look great, right on editing timelines.
  • Universe (reg. $199/year): Red Giant’s collection of over 80 GPU-accelerated plugins for editors and motion graphics artists.
  • VFX Suite (reg. $999): The all-new suite of keying, tracking, cleanup and visual effects compositing tools, all right inside Adobe After Effects.
  • Shooter Suite (reg. $399): Shooter Suite 13.0 is a set of purpose-built applications, including the industry-leading PluralEyes, that give directors of photography, videographers, shooters and filmmakers the ability to bring footage from set to post.

Red Giant Complete: all the tools at one low price

Get 50% off Red Giant Complete

There is also a special promotion, for those who want to upgrade to this package from current Red Giant licenses for any product suite, or an active subscription to Universe: the special upgrade costs $299 – that’s 50% off the first year. The offer of 50% off Red Giant Complete for individuals, students and teachers is valid for only the first year of an annual subscription. Use the Coupon Code: RGC50 and remember the upgrade offer ends February 25th, 2020. Students and teachers who own any Red Giant Suite or have an active subscription to Universe, Red Giant also have a special upgrade offer for just $149. The upgrade offer ends at the same date, but the Coupon Code is RGC50A.

For business customers buying five or more licenses the company has Red Giant’s Volume Program, which includes additional business-focused features such as floating licenses, remote deployment, advanced support, training and more.

The post Red Giant Complete: all the Red Giant tools at one low price appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

That One Astonishing Scene in ‘The Irishman’ Explained

The Irishman is an epic, and we’ll look at how one specific moment is executed perfectly.

Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman is streaming on Netflix this week, and soon everyone will have a chance to watch it. There is a lot to unpack in this movie; it’s made by one of the greatest filmmakers of all time and stars many of his greatest collaborators.

Read More

Fstoppers Reviews Peak Design’s New Updates and Additions to Entire Everyday Bag Lineup

Fstoppers Reviews Peak Design's New Updates and Additions to Entire Everyday Bag Lineup

Peak Design is responsible for running some of the most successful Kickstarter projects to date. The company has now launched updates to its existing series of popular Everyday bags while adding a few new ones into the mix. This time, they’re even skipping Kickstarter: everything ships today.

[ Read More ]

Hive announces new CX series Lights

Hive Lighting has released the new CX line of lights starting with the Wasp 100-CX & Hornet 200-CX. These are omni-color LED lights which are new and improved versions of the original Wasp 100-C & Hornet 200-C and come in at a lower price point. The Wasp 100-C uses 75 watts to create 320FC at … Continued

The post Hive announces new CX series Lights appeared first on Newsshooter.

Top Black Friday Deals for Filmmakers – Part 2: Lenses, Computers, Laptops, Tablets

Our first Black Friday deals post features interesting lenses from Canon, FUJIFILM, Olympus, Panasonic, Rokinon, Sigma, and Sony. Additionally there are a couple of Black Friday offers from Apple and one Lenovo laptop. This is the second out of three Black Friday posts. In the next post we will take a look at more filmmaking gear – gimbals, tripods, monitors, etc…

I browsed the current deals on our partners’ websites and have selected the best offers currently available which I think could be interesting for you. Some offers are only available at the American store B&H, others are only available at the European store CVP, and some are available globally with both our partners. By shopping at our partners’ stores, you are supporting cinema5D through our buy links, as we get a small affiliate commission when a purchase is completed.

This year we decided to divide the Black Friday deals into three posts, which we will publish in the next days before Friday November 29:

  1. Cameras, Drones, FilmConvert, MZed
  2. Lenses, Computers, Laptops, Tablets
  3. Gimbals, Tripods, Monitors, Wireless Video

Today’s post is the second out of three and it features only lenses, computers, laptops, and tablets. Most of these posts should be active til Cyber Monday on December 2nd, but there might be exceptions. Please always check the link to see when the deal expires.

Now, let’s take a look at the top Black friday camera deals for filmmakers:

First, let’s take a look at Canon EF full-frame lenses and then Canon EF-S lenses for APS-C cameras.

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens – $300/€313 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens Was: $2,199.00  Now: $1,899.00 (Savings: $300.00)

CVP Buy link: Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens Was: €1,860.38  Now: €1,546.52 (Savings: €313.86)

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens – $300/€247 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Was: $1,899.00  Now: $1,599.00 (Savings: $300.00)

CVP Buy link: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Was: €1,632.08  Now: €1,384.49 (Savings: €247.59)

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens – $300/€254 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens Was: $2,099.00  Now: $1,799.00 (Savings: $300.00)

CVP Buy link: Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens Was: €1,944.48  Now: €1,690.47 (Savings: €254.01)

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens – $400/€299 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Was: $2,199.00  Now: $1,799.00 (Savings: $400.00)

CVP Buy link: Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Was: €1,887.93  Now: €1,588.67 (Savings: €299.26)

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens – $300 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens Was: $799.00  Now: $499.00 (Savings: $300.00)

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Lens – $100 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Lens Was: $399.00  Now: $299.00 (Savings: $100.00)

Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Lens – $150 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Lens Was: $419.00  Now: $269.00 (Savings: $150.00)

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Lens – $200 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Lens Was: $899.00  Now: $699.00 (Savings: $200.00)

Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens – $50 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens Was: $149.00  Now: $99.00 (Savings: $50.00)

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens – $330 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens Was: $879.00  Now: $549.00 (Savings: $330.00)

Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Lens – $250 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Lens Was: $649.00  Now: $399.00 (Savings: $250.00)

Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens – $200/€175 Discount

B&H Buy link: Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens Was: $1,099.00  Now: $899.00 (Savings: $200.00)

CVP Buy link: Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens Was: €1,001.64  Now: €826.42 (Savings: €175.22 – CashBack)

Next up, FUJIFILM APS-C lenses for the X-mount.

FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200/€175 Discount

B&H Buy link: FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,199.00  Now: $999.00 (Savings: $200.00)

CVP Buy link: FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Lens Was: €972.43  Now: €797.22 (Savings: €175.21 – CashBack)

FUJIFILM XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200 Discount

B&H Buy link: FUJIFILM XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,599.00  Now: $1,399.00 (Savings: $200.00)

FUJIFILM XF 80mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro Lens with UV Filter Kit – $250 Discount

B&H Buy link: FUJIFILM XF 80mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,199.00  Now: $949.00 (Savings: $250.00)

Now Olympus and Panasonic lenses for Micro four thirds mount.

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm f/4-5.6 Lens – $150 Discount

B&H Buy link: Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm f/4-5.6 Lens Was: $699.00  Now: $549.00 (Savings: $150.00)

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO Lens – $200 Discount

B&H Buy link: Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO Lens Was: $999.00  Now: $799.00 (Savings: $200.00)

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 25mm f/1.8 Lens – $150 Discount

B&H Buy link: Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 25mm f/1.8 Lens Was: $399.00  Now: $249.00 (Savings: $150.00)

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm f/1.8 Lens – $150 Discount

B&H Buy link: Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm f/1.8 Lens Was: $399.00  Now: $249.00 (Savings: $150.00)

Panasonic Leica DG 8-18mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200/€320 Discount

B&H Buy link: Panasonic Leica DG 8-18mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,097.99  Now: $897.99 (Savings: $200.00)

CVP Buy link: Panasonic Leica DG 8-18mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. Lens Was: €1,021.11  Now: €700.27 (Savings: €320.84 including CashBack)

Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200 Discount

B&H Buy link: Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $997.99  Now: $797.99 (Savings: $200.00)

Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 II O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200/€320 Discount

B&H Buy link: Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 II O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,097.99  Now: $897.99 (Savings: $200.00)

CVP Buy link: Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 II O.I.S. Lens Was: €860.49  Now: €791.57 (Savings: €68.92)

Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit – $400/€298 Discount

B&H Buy link: Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 O.I.S. Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,597.99  Now: $1,197.99 (Savings: $400.00)

CVP Buy link: Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 O.I.S. Lens Was: €1,167.12  Now: €868.47 (Savings: €298.65 including CashBack)

Cine lenses offer some nice deals too.

Rokinon 24, 35, 50, 85mm T1.5 Cine DS Lens Bundle for Canon EF Mount – $800 Discount

B&H Buy link: Rokinon 24, 35, 50, 85mm T1.5 Cine DS Lens Bundle for Canon EF Mount Was: $2,346.00  Now: $1,546.00 (Savings: $800.00)

Rokinon Xeen 50mm T1.5 Lens for Canon EF Mount – $1,000 Discount

The discount applies on more focal lengths of Rokinon Xeen cine primes.

B&H Buy link: Rokinon Xeen 50mm T1.5 Lens for Canon EF Mount Was: $2,495.00  Now: $1,495.00 (Savings: $1,000.00)

Sigma EF lenses are next.

Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens for Canon EF – $160 Discount

B&H Buy link: Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens for Canon EF Was: $799.00  Now: $639.00 (Savings: $160.00)

Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens for Canon EF – $500 Discount

B&H Buy link: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens for Canon EF Was: $969.00  Now: $469.00 (Savings: $500.00)

Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens for Canon EF – $250 Discount

B&H Buy link: Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens for Canon EF Was: $899.00  Now: $649.00 (Savings: $250.00)

Last but not least, Sony zoom lens.

Sony FE 24-105mm f/4 Lens with UV Filter Kit – $200 Discount

B&H Buy link: Sony FE 24-105mm f/4 Lens with UV Filter Kit Was: $1,398.00  Now: $1,198.00 (Savings: $200.00)

Apple 27″ iMac with Retina 5K Display (Mid 2017) – $700 Discount

Configuration: 3.8 GHz Intel Core i5 Quad-Core, 8GB of DDR4 RAM | 2TB Fusion Drive, 27″ 5120 x 2880 IPS Retina 5K Display, AMD Radeon Pro 580 Graphics Card (8GB)

B&H Buy link: Apple 27″ iMac with Retina 5K Display (Mid 2017) Was: $2,299.00  Now: $1,599.00 (Savings: $700.00)

Apple 27″ iMac with Retina 5K Display (Early 2019) – $250 Discount

Configuration: 3.7 GHz Intel Core i5 Six-Core, 8GB of DDR4 RAM | 512GB PCIe SSD, 27″ 5120 x 2880 IPS Retina 5K Display, AMD Radeon Pro 580X GPU (8GB)

B&H Buy link: Apple 27″ iMac with Retina 5K Display (Early 2019) Was: $2,399.00  Now: $2,149.00 (Savings: $250.00)

Apple 15.4″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) – $400 Discount

Configuration: 2.6 GHz Intel Core i7 Six-Core, 16GB of 2400 MHz DDR4 RAM | 256GB SSD, 15.4″ 2880 x 1800 Retina Display, AMD Radeon Pro 555X GPU (4GB GDDR5)

B&H Buy link: Apple 15.4″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) Was: $2,399.00  Now: $1,999.00 (Savings: $400.00)

Apple 15.4″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) – $450 Discount

Configuration: 2.3 GHz Intel Core i9 Eight-Core, 16GB of 2400 MHz DDR4 RAM | 512GB SSD, 15.4″ 2880 x 1800 Retina Display, AMD Radeon Pro 560X GPU (4GB GDDR5)

B&H Buy link: Apple 15.4″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) Was: $2,799.00  Now: $2,349.00 (Savings: $450.00)

Apple 13.3″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) – $230 Discount

Configuration: 2.4 GHz Intel Core i5 Quad-Core, 8GB 2133 MHz LPDDR3 RAM | 256GB SSD, 13.3″ 2560 x 1600 IPS Retina Display, Integrated Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655

B&H Buy link: Apple 13.3″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (Mid 2019) Was: $1,809.00  Now: $1,579.00 (Savings: $230.00)

Apple 12.9″ iPad Pro (Late 2018, 256GB, Wi-Fi Only) – $100 Discount

Configuration: 12.9″ Multi-Touch Liquid Retina Display, 2732 x 2048 Screen Resolution (264 ppi), Apple A12X 64-Bit SoC + M12 Coprocessor, Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac), BT 5.0

B&H Buy link: Apple 12.9″ iPad Pro (Late 2018, 256GB, Wi-Fi Only) Was: $1,149.00  Now: $1,049.00 (Savings: $100.00)

Apple 11″ iPad Pro (Late 2018, 64GB, Wi-Fi Only) – $100 Discount

Configuration: 11″ Multi-Touch Liquid Retina Display, 2388 x 1668 Screen Resolution (264 ppi), Apple A12X 64-Bit SoC + M12 Coprocessor, Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac), BT 5.0

B&H Buy link: Apple 11″ iPad Pro (Late 2018, 64GB, Wi-Fi Only) Was: $799.00  Now: $699.00 (Savings: $100.00)

HyperDrive DUO USB Type-C Hub for MacBook Pro/Air – $40 Discount

The HyperDrive Duo USB Type-C Hub from HYPER converts the Thunderbolt 3 ports on MacBook Pro (2016-2019) or MacBook Air (2018 & 2019) into additional connections. The slim hub provides one HDMI port, two USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A ports, and two USB Type-C ports to access printers, external drives, external displays, and other compatible peripherals.

The top USB Type-C port, which is closest to the HDMI port, supports 40 Gb/s Thunderbolt 3, 5K video output, and 100W of power delivery. The second USB Type-C port supports 5 Gb/s USB 3.1 Gen 1 and 60W of power delivery. There are also SD and microSD card slots. Please note that this hub does not support Apple’s SuperDrive and the USB ports will not charge an iPad.

B&H Buy link: HyperDrive DUO USB Type-C Hub for MacBook Pro/Air Was: $89.99  Now: $49.99 (Savings: $40.00)

Lenovo 15.6″ IdeaPad S340 Laptop – $400 Discount

Configuration: 1.6 GHz Intel Core i5-8265U Quad-Core, 12GB of DDR4 RAM | 512GB M.2 NVMe SSD, 15.6″ Full HD 1920 x 1080 TN Display, Integrated Graphics

B&H Buy link: Lenovo 15.6″ IdeaPad S340 Laptop Was: $949.00  Now: $549.00 (Savings: $400.00)

Did you like any of our deals? Did we miss something interesting? Let us know in the comments underneath the article.

The post Top Black Friday Deals for Filmmakers – Part 2: Lenses, Computers, Laptops, Tablets appeared first on cinema5D.

Moment Fisheye 14mm – Sharper 170° FOV Lens for Phones Introduced

Moment fisheye 14mm lens is the newest addition to Moment’s line of smartphone lenses. It features 170° FOV and bi-aspherical design for edge-to-edge sharpness. With the new Moment Pro Camera app, the distortion of this lens can be corrected. It is available now for $89.99 the first 48 hours, later for $119.99. 

New Fisheye 14mm lens. Source: Moment

The US company Moment is well known for their smartphone lenses and accessories. When I take a look at Moment’s webshop, I can see they offer already a wide range of lenses for their system. They have 1.33x anamorphic lens, 18mm wide lens, 58mm telephoto lens, macro lens, and Moment even already offers 170° FOV fisheye lens in their portfolio. Now, the company is announcing another fisheye lens. Why? Let’s take a look at its features and try to find the answer.

Moment Fisheye 14mm Lens

The new Moment Fisheye 14mm (full frame focal length equivalent) Lens features an entirely new optical design created for the latest camera phones (like the Pixel 4, iPhone 11, One Plus 7, and Galaxy S10). According to the company, the lens includes a unique, bi-aspherical design that uses 15% more of the image sensor than Moment’s fisheye 15mm (previously called Superfish Lens).

New Fisheye 14mm lens. Source: Moment

Thanks to the bi-aspherical optical design, the image should be sharp from edge to edge. The front of the lens is slightly curved to support this new aspherical element.

The field of view is the same as the previous Moment fisheye lens at 170°, which is 30% wider image than the 120° found on ultra-wide phone lenses. The company claims, that this lens is sharper than the ultra-wide phone lens and works in Night mode (the ultra-wide does not).

New Fisheye 14mm lens. Source: Moment

Moment is marketing this lens towards users who are thinking about getting a GoPro. They say it will deliver similar results for 1/3rd of the price (given you already have the Moment phone cover to mount this lens).

Moment Pro Camera app is introducing distortion correction for this new lens. You can slide to correct the bending of the image. This feature is currently available for iOS only. It is coming to Android in the next few weeks.

The lens is compatible with Moment phone covers, which are available for most smartphone flagships.

New Fisheye 14mm lens. Source: Moment

Pricing and Availability

The new Moment fisheye 14mm lens is available now. The price has been set to $119.99, but Moment offers this lens exclusively at a reduced price of $89.99 for the first 48 hours.

New Fisheye 14mm lens. Source: Moment

What do you think of the new Moment fisheye 14mm lens? Do you use Moment gear with your phone? Let us know in the comments underneath the article.

The post Moment Fisheye 14mm – Sharper 170° FOV Lens for Phones Introduced appeared first on cinema5D.