NEW K35 Primes by Servicevision

Those Full Frame Fanatics from Barcelona are at it again. The same Servicevision team who designed and built the FFA Scorpiolens Anamorphic 2x primes have developed a completely new series of lenses with matching characteristics, flares and bokeh to augment the original, venerable, vintage Canon K35 sets. These new lenses are called NEW K35 by Servicevision. The set includes a 15mm T1.5… read more…

Blackmagic Releases BMPCC 6K Footage (and It’s Remarkable)

With 12-Bit RAW with Dual Native ISO, the new BMPCC 6K offers a wide dynamic range.

Like everyone else last week, you may have been drooling over the notion of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K shooting 12-bit RAW. But if something was causing you to wait on ordering this compact 6K camera, Blackmagic has dropped a series of test footage clips to eliminate all doubt.

With its compact size, the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K packs a huge punch thanks to a larger Super35mm image sensor and the ability to shoot using an EF mount lens without the need of a speed booster adapter. It can shoot in 12-bit color using Blackmagic Raw, and with dual ISO, it has the same impressive dynamic range as its younger brother, the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. In fact, it’s essentially the same camera with an upgraded image sensor and lens mount. But that extra sensor real estate boosts image resolution to 6K, making it the first pocket-sized 6K camera.

Read More

You’re Gonna Love DJI’s OSMO Mobile 3 and Its New Features

The compact design here offers several advanced features, including active tracking

When I wrote last week about Benro’s compact, folding handheld gimbal design, I had a hunch that DJI wouldn’t be too far behind with such a feature. It was inevitable that, with the mature nature of gimbals these days, designers would turn to ergonomics and how to make the gimbal more compact for storage and carrying. And that’s exactly what happened with the DJI Osmo Mobile 3. And while it’s still only a smartphone centric mobile device, it’s still got some great features that will entice mobile filmmakers to keep it in their bag.

“When we began designing Osmo Mobile 3, we went back to the drawing board with the goal of creating a portable yet intuitive product that uses the latest DJI technology,” said Paul Pan, Senior Product Manager. “We are excited to introduce DJI’s first gimbal with a folding design and hope it inspires our customers to imagine new ways of recording content with their mobile phones.”

Just about everything about the DJI Osmo Mobile 3 says “improvements.”

Read More

You Need to Read the ‘Rear Window’ Script

The Rear Window screenplay is a masterclass in character and tension. Let’s break down the ways it sets the story up for success.

Alfred Hitchcock is the master of suspense. He can give you thrills, chills, and often delivers a movie worthy of audience applause. His usual formula? taking his time. Modern movies aren’t built that way much anymore. We often find ourselves barreling into exposition, character, in an effort to get to the plot.

But I think it’s time we show some appreciation for a movie that takes its time steeping you into all of the above, without much dialogue at all.

I’m talking about Rear Window.

Let’s look at how this classic script builds character, plot, tension and arcs everything while taking its time to deliver the best possible story.

Download the Rear Window Script PDF here!

Read More

Terrence Malik Stands Up to Nazis (and Shoots Digital) In ‘A Hidden Life’ Trailer

The trailer for A Hidden Life reveals a Terrence Malick movie with plot and more gorgeous cinematography. How does he do it?

For some time, we went decades without a new Malick movie and now it seems like they’re popping up all over the place. Since Tree of Life planted the seeds, we’ve entered into the director’s most prolific period. The last few movies have been mixed bags, hwoever. They’ve all been beautiful to look out but none of them have broken out the way Tree of Life did with critics and at the box office.

So why are we excited about this first trailer for Malick’s A Hidden Life? Because this one seems to have his incredible trademark visuals as well as a ton of story. Oh, and it’s another WWII movie from the auteur.

Check out the trailer from Fox Searchlight and we’ll talk what he’s shooting on and the plot after.

“If our leaders, if they are evil, what does one do?”

Read More

5 Essential Writing Tips You Can Learn From ‘Parks and Rec’

Parks and Rec is one of the most successful TV comedies of all time. It’s a unique show that capitalized on an audience unsure how they felt about government.

The financial crisis in American hit in 2008. Suddenly, people were paying a lot more attention to the government. And guess what? None of it was funny.

Lucky for us, Michael Schur and Greg Daniels were off in a room somewhere, talking about TV show ideas. They pitched a bunch back and forth but kept going back to chasing a show that felt like The Office, but in the public sector. After they fleshed out that idea, it became Parks and Recreation, and the rest is history.

Check out the video from Behind the Curtain and let’s talk writing tips after the jump!

1. What does your character believe in? And who are they trying to convince?

One of the coolest things about Parks and Rec is that each character has a mission about who they are and what they want to accomplish. For Ron Swanson, that mission is nothing. For Leslie Knope, it’s everything.

Read More

The Art of the Cut Podcast Eps. 8 (w/ Oscar and ACE Eddie Nominated Editor Mark Goldblatt )

The Art of the Cut podcast brings the fantastic conversations that Steve Hullfish has with world renowned editors into your car, living room, editing suite and beyond. In each episode, Steve talks with editors ranging from emerging stars to Oscar and Emmy winners. Hear from the top editors of today about their careers, editing workflows and about their work on some of the biggest films and TV shows of the year.

Mark Goldblatt editing with a Moviola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Steve had a chance to speak with Mark Goldblatt. Mark started his career in the 1970’s and has since worked on legendary films such as James Camerons “The Terminator”, Michael Bays “Pearl Harbor”, “X-Men: The Last Stand” and most recently Eli Roths “Death Wish”. To hear more about Mark’s amazing career, listen to the full podcast below:

The Art of the Cut podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Anchor, Google Podcasts, Breaker, Pocket Casts, Overcast and Radio Public. If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app and tell a friend!

The post The Art of the Cut Podcast Eps. 8 (w/ Oscar and ACE Eddie Nominated Editor Mark Goldblatt ) appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

Approved Media List for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K

Now that the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K, a new handheld digital film camera with a full Super 35 size 6K HDR image sensor, 13 stops of dynamic range, an EF lens mount and dual native ISO up to 25,600 for incredible low light performance is shipping from Blackmagic Design it is time for buyers to know exactly what media type is best for their new purchase. This is easy if you do not follow this extensive list of approved media complied by Blackmagic Design and your camera skips frames that is on you.

Pocket 6K

This new 6K model of the Pocket Cinema Camera 6K builds on the popularity of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K but has a larger Super 35 sensor size with 6K resolution, allowing higher image quality. The EF lens mount model works with a wide range of lenses from companies such as Canon, Zeiss, Sigma and Schneider to name a few. Bigger sensor. Higher Resolution. Canon EF Lens Mount. Those are the big differences. I also bet, if I were a betting man, that the approved media list for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K may be a slightly shorter list than approved media for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. Do not immediately expect what works in the 4K to work exactly the same in the 6K version. Just be smart and follow the approved list.

Pocket 6K

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 6K Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 50 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 60 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 2.8K 17:9 Blackmagic RAW 3:1 up to 120 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

What SD cards should I use with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K?Pocket 6K

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 16:9 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 30 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 16:9 Blackmagic RAW 8:1 up to 30 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 12:1 up to 60 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Delkin Devices Power SDXC USH-II 64GB
Delkin Devices Prime SDXC USH-II 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 256GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB
Wise SD2-64U3 SDXC UHS-II 64GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Delkin Devices Power SDXC USH-II 64GB
Delkin Devices Prime SDXC USH-II 128GB
Lexar Professional 2000x UHS-II 300MB/s SDXC 64GB
Lexar Professional 2000x UHS-II 300MB/s SDXC 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 256GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB
Toshiba Exceria Pro UHS-II N502 SDXC 256GB
Wise SD2-64U3 SDXC UHS-II 64GB

What USB‑C drives should I use with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K?Will the Komodo (dragon) eat the Blackmagic Pocket CC 6K?

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 6K Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 50 fps.

Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 60 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 2.8K 17:9 Blackmagic RAW 3:1 up to 120 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 1TB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD 1TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB‑C drives are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 1TB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD 1TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The post Approved Media List for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact router for emerging 8K workflows

AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact 32x32 12G-SDI router

Designed for use in broadcast, production and ProAV environments, the KUMO 3232-12G is AJA’s compact router solution for flexible and cost-efficient 12G-SDI routing. The KUMO is now shipping.

With the KUMO, says AJA, professionals can “get the the routing capabilities you need at a price that fits well within your budget. The company says that KUMO routers are so affordable they can even be used in place of traditional DAs to distribute signals to multiple locations. KUMO routers provide an incredible price/performance ratio while still maintaining the highest quality standards.

Designed for critical broadcast, production and post environments, KUMO routers are built to AJA standards that exceed SMPTE specifications. The use of premium components coupled with dual redundant power supplies ensures the highest signal quality and maximum uptime even in the unexpected event of a power supply failure.

For emerging 8K workflows

The KUMO 3232-12G supports large format resolutions, high frame rates and deep color formats, while reducing cable runs when transporting 4K/UltraHD over SDI. KUMO 3232-12G offers network-based and/or physical control and mirrors the form of AJA’s production-proven KUMO 3232 routers, with the additional benefit of a new USB port for configuring IP addresses via AJA’s eMini-Setup software. For emerging 8K workflows, KUMO 3232-12G is also equipped for multi-port gang-routing.

Key feature highlights include:

  • 12G-SDI inputs and outputs for up to 4K/UltraHD support at 60p
  • Small, portable 2RU form factor
  • Single cable support for streamlined 4K/UltraHD signal routing
  • Redundant power supply option
  • Configure and save up to eight salvos per router
  • Auto re-clocking SDI rates: 270 Mbps /1.483/1.485/2.967/2.970/5.934/5.940/11.868/11.880 Gbps
  • Support for AJA KUMO Control Panels (hardware, with direct connect or networked)
  • USB port to easily configure the router IP address and simplify initial network configurations
  • Embedded web server for remote control on any standard web browser
  • 5-year warranty and support

The KUMO 3232-12G is now available for $3995. For more information, visit AJA’s website.

The post AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact router for emerging 8K workflows appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

Video: Debunking popular food photography ‘hacks’

Commercial food photographer Scott Choucino has published a new video debunking some of the food photography ‘hacks’ popularized in YouTube videos. Choucino comments on a variety of supposed industry techniques, including things like using lipstick to make fruit look ripe and spraying hairspray on fruit.

‘We don’t color in fruit if it’s the wrong color, we just buy more fruit,’ Choucino explains in the video while shrugging. The photographer shares some techniques that are used by food photography professionals, as well, including using glycerin and water — not hairspray — to make fruit look wet. Choucino likewise touches on the topic of making meat look cooked, getting gooey cheese pizza shots, myths about foamy coffee and more.

Algorithms Replaced Gatekeepers and Lowered the Bar on Quality

The rise of social media has had a massive impact on the art we see, consume, and interact with on a daily basis. Some of that impact was positive, some negative, but one of the most radical changes has also been one of the most detrimental: the demise of the gatekeepers.

Gatekeepers were the tastemakers of the past: the magazine editors, television produces, publishing executives, and gallery curators. In other words, the people who decided what work was seen and what remained in slush piles or piled up on the cutting room floor.

In their heyday, these powerful people made for a formidable obstacle and important line of defense. Nothing reached a broader audience without at least a partial stamp of approval.

Then came social media.

The Internet had already started democratizing the process of “getting noticed,” but “going viral” was still relegated to email forwards until Facebook came along with the news feed. Almost overnight, everybody had a platform, and the gatekeepers were stripped of their power. Anybody with an Internet connection could have their work explode. This popularity, in turn, meant major outlets had to share the work or risk being seen as stuffy and out of touch with their audience.

This change was positive at first. But what began as a refreshing influx of work that might never have been seen—creative people and creative ideas getting their due—turned into an overwhelming flood of content. Too little signal, too much noise. And so the same social media giants who displaced the gatekeepers came up with algorithms that would help sift through the mountains of content. Algorithms that prioritized popularity and shareability above all else.

Algorithms that, over time, have done more to stifle creative expression and bury important ideas than the gatekeepers ever did.

Photography has not been immune to this change. As iconic magazines folded, Instagram flourished. Infinite scroll and a screen in every pocket translates into an insatiable need for content. But not just content, popular content. Likable content. Shareable content.

Instagram and Facebook’s algorithms made sure this content made it to the top of your feed and got the most views. Marketing-savvy photographers saw this, and began shifting their style and strategy to coincide. The race to the lowest common denominator was on. Now, many photographers are more interested in “optimizing their social media strategy” than honing their craft or finding their creative voice.

Which article do you think performed better: “How to Grow your Instagram in 2019” or a thoughtful video on “The Artist’s Ego“?

It’s a catch-22. Artists create work because they want it to be seen. So which do you sacrifice: the integrity of your work, or its potential reach? Do you share something bland that will appeal to more people, or something true to your artistic vision that may never break through the algorithmic ceiling?

Let me be clear, the gatekeepers had it coming. The pre-algorithm age wasn’t some bastion of quality over quantity where everyone got a fair shot and the best work was immediately noticed and highlighted. If you knew someone who knew someone, you were much more likely to get “noticed”—still a reality in a lot of the art world and beyond. The rise of algorithms and the demise of traditional gatekeepers made sure that [almost] anybody’s work could be seen, appreciated, and explode into the public consciousness no matter their gender, the color of their skin, or whether their message was “sanctioned” by the people in power. But we lost something, too.

At their best, the gatekeepers of yesteryear were giants who recognized quality and placed the public interest ahead of their prejudices. People who elevated work that was interesting, innovative, or challenging. When Richard Rovere turned in an anti-segregation “Letter from Washington” to the New Yorker, founding Editor Harold Ross went on a bit of a racist tirade about it in the notes, but ultimately finished his note by writing, “I suppose we’ve got to print this…”

Recalling the experience later, Rovere wrote:

The man clearly despised what I had written for his magazine. He thought it was nonsense. To a degree, he regarded me as an enemy of his values. Yet the article was factually accurate, reasonably well written, and a serious piece of reporting by a man he had asked to cover Washington, and that, for Ross, was that.

Later, when E.J. Kahn, Jr. wrote an article defending two of his friends who were being attacked in the press as pro-communist, the conservative Ross again chose quality over personal prejudice. “Jesus Christ, Kahn, why did you have to write this goddamn piece?” he told Kahn. “Now I have to run it.” (Source)

These examples are obviously a bit removed from photography, but the point stands: People (some people) can evaluate the quality and impact of a piece of work—be it writing or photography—with a subtlety that escapes the most advanced artificial intelligence, to say nothing of the relatively simplistic algorithms that decide what you see in your Facebook and Instagram feeds. Has any algorithm ever overlooked its prejudice towards clicks?

Popular and sharable does not necessarily equal good; most of us can agree on that much (I hope). And while critics and tastemakers weren’t always been the best judges of what is, their evaluation of “good art” went far beyond the adolescent idea that “attention = quality.”

There is no going back to the days before social media, and I’m not even sure that we should. But I would love to go back to the days of chronological feeds, before social media algorithms undid some of the positive impact that social media initially made. These algorithms were born out of an interest in profit. More popular = more eyes = more ad clicks = more money. They weren’t a good idea when they were announced, and they aren’t a good idea now. Yet they continue to shape our perception of what’s worth our time and attention.

Out of sight, out of mind; when some of the best work remains out of sight, only clichés come to mind. Long exposure waterfalls. The solitary hiker on the craggy cliff overlooking the sunset or aurora borealis. A beautiful woman leading her companion by the hand through a lavender field. Text memes that are so popular they overwhelm the photography on a photo sharing platform, and Instagram is forced to purge accounts with 13M+ followers.

There’s no easy solution, but it’s our responsibility as individuals to occasionally bypass the algorithm and go digging through the slush pile. To create and appreciating exceptional and important work. To find great work that never got noticed and share it. To prioritize craft over clicks.

For better or worse, we have to be our own gatekeepers now.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K is a groundbreaking camera in features and in price.

Is The Future About More Than Just Cameras?

I recently attended the webinar that Blackmagic Design held to make four new products announcements. I have to admit that I didn’t know what Blackmagic Design was planning on introducing, so I went into the webinar with a clean slate without any pre-conceived notions about what they were going to intro. The rumor sites and grapevine had been basically silent about much new coming from Blackmagic Design, so this webinar was looking to be quite interesting. I wasn’t wrong; the announcements were significant and kind of covered a wide swath of product categories, both in hardware as well as software.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Announcing a 6K camera for $2,495, Blackmagic took a page out of the playbook known as a preemptive strike against competitor Panasonic with their $4,000 S1H 6K camera that won’t even be available until the fall of 2019.

A Preemptive Panasonic Strike?

As you’re probably aware, the big buzz from Cine Gear 2019 was Panasonic’s announcement of the S1H, a 6K FF mirrorless camera that will be available in the fall of this year. It will utilize Panasonic’s relatively new L lens mount, it’s 6K and has a lot of other tricks up its sleeve. The excitement was that the S1H looked to be the first native 6K camera in the $4,000 price range. Impressive, right? It looks as if Blackmagic Design CEO Grant Petty and company figured out a way to steal a lot of Panasonic’s thunder with the announcement of the new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K. It will sell for, wait for it…$2,495! Wow, kudos to Blackmagic Design, that’s a pretty impressive headline just for including the words Cinema, 6K and $2,495 in one breath. The other bullet points are:

  • 6144 x 3456 S35 Image Sensor.
  • 13 Stops Dynamic Range.
  • EF Lens Mount.
  • Dual Native ISO up to 25,600.
  • 5” LCD Touchscreen.
  • Internal Prores recording up to 4K.
  • 12-bit Blackmagic RAW in all formats up to 6K.
  • Built-in CFast and SD UHS-II card recorders.
  • USB C for recording to external SSDs.
  • Full-size HDMI for HDR and 10-bit output.
  • Mini XLR w 48v Phantom power.
Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K a 5” integrated LCD screen. Nope, it’s not a flippy screen.

A bit more about the rest of those 6K imager specs, it will shoot up to 50 fps at 6144×3456 16:9 or 60 fps at 6144×2560 2.4:1 and 60 fps at 5744×3024 17:9. For higher frame rates, you can shoot up to 120 fps at 2.8K 2868×1512 17:9. You can even work in true anamorphic 6:5 using anamorphic lenses in 3.7K 60 fps at 3728 x 3104.

Best of all, the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema 6K Camera is available now. Kudos to Blackmagic Design for announcing a shipping camera.

On to the next product announcement.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
A lot of the new features in Resolve 16.1 are in the Edit page.

They’ve Updated Resolve Again?

Blackmagic Design also announced DaVinci Resolve 16.1. The new features are focused mostly on the new cut page, which Blackmagic Design is continuing to work on in their goal to make it the world’s fastest editor, which as a FCP X user, I think they have their work cut out for them to claim that title as currently FCP X is by far the fastest editor on the market, followed closely by Resolve and AVID Media Composer with Premiere at the back of the pack as far as sheer editing speed.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Resolve has always been a world a class color correction and grading tool and continues that tradition in version 16.1.

So What Did They Change?

Changes in the bin now allow customers to place media in various folders and isolate clips from being used when viewing clips in the source tape, sync bin or sync window. Clips will be seen in all folders below the current level, and as customers navigate around the levels in the bin, the source tape will reconfigure in real-time. There’s even a menu for directly selecting folders in a customer’s project.

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 Features:

  • New public beta allows us to continue development.
  • New updates allow editors to improve sorting of media.
  • Smart Indicator adds UI feedback for intelligent edit features.
  • New cut clip tool allows instant cutting of clips in the timeline.
  • New button changes on DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard.
  • Boring Detector shows areas of the timeline that lack interest.
  • New Sync Bin organizes and displays sync media for easy shot selection.
  • Close up edit mode now includes face recognition to better frame shots.
  • New sync window allows manual syncing of clips or audio-based sync.
  • Multiple other improvements in editing, color, Fusion and Fairlight audio pages.
Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Resolve 16.1 is included free of charge with the purchase of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K Camera. See what Blackmagic design is doing there? Brilliant!

I personally can’t wait to put the “Boring Detector” through its paces. DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta is available now for download from the Blackmagic Design website.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini has a clean, simple front panel with a handy integrated LCD screen.

What Exactly Is An UltraStudio 4K Mini?

As you may or may not know, Blackmagic Design has a long history in building all kinds of cool, interesting and useful video convertor boxes of various types that do all kinds of cool, interesting useful things if you need to interface with, you know, real video tools like switchers for live television, projectors, recorders and other hardware.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Available in three different configurations, the Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini will be useful in many different live and streaming workflows.

At $995, the UltraStudio 4K Mini is essentially a tool that gives you hardware connections to the outside world for editing, archiving from legacy old broadcast video decks (do you ever need to access HDCAM or formats like DVCPro or Digital Betacam?), outputting broadcast graphics to a switcher or even, most relevant for 2019, live streaming for webisodes, webcasts, Facebook Live and other streaming kinds of things. What has enabled all of this input/output power has been the advent and almost standardization of Thunderbolt 3.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini rear panel features a plethora of inputs and outputs.

Some key features of the UltraStudio 4K Mini:

  • Analog connections.
  • Broadcast quality 8- and 10-bit high dynamic range capture in all formats up to 4K DCI at 60p, and 12-bit high dynamic range capture in all formats up to 4K DCI at 30p.
  • Push Button Controls.
  • Built-in LCD for monitoring signal and setup.
  • XLR Mic input.
  • ¼” headphone output.
  • USB input for keyboard and mouse.
  • Built-in SD card reader.
  • Thunderbolt 3 interface for 40 Gb/s capture and playback.
  • 3 models available with both portable and rack mount options.
  • Ideal for edit monitoring, live graphics, archive and streaming.
  • 12G‑SDI, HDMI 2.0, YUV/NTSC/PAL video and balanced audio.
  • Supports 45W trickle charging to a connected computer.
  • Supports all SD, 720p, 1080i, 1080p, 2160p and 4K DCI formats.
  • Front panel with LCD, mic input, headphone and SD card slot.
  • Compatible with DaVinci Resolve for editing, color, VFX and audio.
  • Supports DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro, Avid and more.
  • Includes support for Mac, Windows and Linux.

All in all, it seems like a pretty useful box that many users will find appealing for doing all kinds of different and unusual video workflows.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic RAW Speed Test will come in handy for many users. Yes, after years and years, it’s finally been updated!

The Finally Updated Blackmagic Design Speed Test?

Blackmagic Speed Test has been an industry-standard tool that many of us have counted on to check system data throughput for years. If you set up a new RAID and want to benchmark, the Blackmagic Design Speed Test has been an invaluable testing tool to get a real-world measurement so you know your new RAID’s speed capability.   

Blackmagic RAW Speed Test is a CPU and GPU benchmarking tool that users can use to test the speed of decoding full resolution Blackmagic RAW frames on their system. Multiple CPU cores and GPUs are automatically detected and used during the test so that customers get accurate and realistic results. Simply select Blackmagic RAW constant bitrate 3:1, 5:1, 8:1 or 12:1 and the desired resolution to perform the test. Although Blackmagic RAW Speed Test will run multiple resolution and frame rate tests on their system, customers can also select a specific test resolution to run on the main meters and the test will continue to run constantly, allowing stress testing of host computers.

Blackmagic RAW Speed Test Features:

  • Tests system performance of both CPUs and GPUs using Blackmagic RAW.
  • Blackmagic RAW based testing ensures more accurate performance results.

While not a huge new product innovation, the new Blackmagic Speed Test is a welcome new version that updates the older version with new tools and new capability. Also, it’s free on the Blackmagic Design website, which is very cool—who doesn’t like free?

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
It’s difficult to know where our industry is going. Blackmagic Design definitely has an innovative business plan for how they’ll not only survive but also thrive in the new reality of video/digital cinema production.

What Does This All Mean For The Production Industry?

I don’t claim to be the Oracle of the video industry, but these new product announcements seem to indicate a few new ideas that occur to me about Blackmagic Design and their role within the industry. It’s 2019, and we have to acknowledge that video production is going through a lot of change right now. As predicted for the past few years, today we have amazingly sophisticated and capable products available that can do things that were inconceivable just a few short years ago.

What’s astounding is that we’re not only able to choose from all of these very capable products from dozens of different companies, we’re able to buy them for next to nothing. Products like the new Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema 6K camera must be giving the strategists and designers at Canon, Sony and Panasonic a lot of sleepless nights. I’d seriously question if it’s even worth introducing as many new cameras as these companies have in the past when the price floor is going so low for such high-end features. Sure, it doesn’t have built-in NDs and TC i/o exactly (although it does work with external TC generators like the Tentacle Sync Es!), but each new camera seems to include more and more professional-level features, so much so that the lines are blurring between consumer/producer and professional cameras quite a bit.

Time Travel

If you’d have told the average person in production that the hottest cinema camera in 2019 was a 6K capable, tiny, lightweight removable lens body that could record Prores at up to 4K and Blackmagic RAW at up to 6K, nobody would have believed that was possible. When you’d have told them that all of this could be had for a mere $2,495, they’d have shaken their heads. That’s significantly less money than a camera back accessory cost for your average cinema camera sold in 2010; for that money, you get the entire camera, add battery, lens and a media card and you’re shooting. It’s amazing.

The Bigger Picture

The other thing that I see Blackmagic Design doing is taking a page from the Apple playback of yore—they’re not becoming a camera company, and they’re becoming a system solution provider. Think about it, what other company in pro video/digital cinema makes the camera you shoot with, the editing software suite you edit with, the hardware interface that lets the editing program communicate with, ingest and playback almost any video format for live production, streaming and webcasting. They even make the benchmark software you use to optimize your GPU, CPU and drives/RAIDs. As far as I can think of, there’s no other company out there doing this, it’s smart, clever and makes great business sense. For the user, it’s a great benefit, Blackmagic Design is integrating their own version of RAW that works in their editing suite and there are several new features in Resolve that are specifically targeted to make it appealing to shoot with their new 6K, inexpensive camera.

It’s difficult to say what happens next in our business, but Blackmagic Design is making some bold moves that will put them into a powerful position against their competition. While I haven’t had my hands on the new Pocket Cinema 6K camera yet, I look forward to giving it a try and seeing what it can do for my own production pipeline. I’ve already been spending time in Resolve, so I look forward to trying out V16.1 too. Video production and digital cinema are headed into uncharted waters as far as the economic model, rates are down, production budgets are down, although the volume of production is up. Blackmagic Design has given users some valuable, affordable new tools to use in the reality of what’s happening in production.

The post Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure appeared first on HD Video Pro.

Canon and Sony, step aside: Samsung has a 108 megapixel image sensor

Canon and Sony, step aside: Samsung has a 108 megapixel sensor

The next Xiaomi smartphone will have a 64 megapixel camera, thanks to Samsung, and the two companies announced  a 108 megapixel sensor for smartphone cameras, able to shoot 6K video.

While Canon and Sony work on their sensors with two digits millions of pixels, for full frame cameras, Samsung annouces that it will launch, jointly with Xiaomi, the world’s first 100MP sensor using its Samsung ISOCELL Bright HMX technology. Not only that, it  will be the first mobile image sensor to adopt a large 1/1.33-inch size.  This image sensor can absorb more light in low-lit settings than smaller sensors and its pixel-merging Tetracell technology allows the sensor to imitate big-pixel sensors, by adding four pixels to create as bigger one, producing brighter 27 megapixel images.

Samsung says that “In bright environments, the Smart-ISO, a mechanism that intelligently selects the level of amplifier gains according to the illumination of the environment for optimal light-to-electric signal conversion, switches to a low ISO to improve pixel saturation and produce vivid photographs. The mechanism uses a high ISO in darker settings that helps reduce noise, resulting in clearer pictures.”

Canon and Sony, step aside: Samsung has a 108 megapixel sensor

A 100MP smartphone sensor able to capture 6K video

Xiaomi will debut the Samsung 100MP sensor to offer smartphones with ultra high-resolution cameras. The 108MP sensor surpasses the 100MP mark for the first time ever in smartphone image sensors. It is also the world’s highest-resolution smartphone camera sensor, capable of producing photos with a resolution of 12032 x 9024 pixels.

Filmmakers are also not forgotten, and the new sensor brings something for them, according to Samsung. The company says that “for advanced filming, the HMX supports video recording without losses in field-of-view at resolutions up to 6K (6016 x 3384) 30-frames-per-second (fps). While the complete list of specifications will only be available when Xiaomi announces its 108MP smartphone, videographers who use mobile devices will probably want to keep an eye on the news coming from both companies.

“For ISOCELL Bright HMX, Xiaomi and Samsung have worked closely together from the early conceptual stage to production that has resulted in a groundbreaking 108Mp image sensor. We are very pleased that picture resolutions previously available only in a few top-tier DSLR cameras can now be designed into smartphones,” said Lin Bin, co-founder and president of Xiaomi. “As we continue our partnership, we anticipate bringing not only new mobile camera experiences but also a platform through which our users can create unique content.”

Canon and Sony, step aside: Samsung has a 108 megapixel sensor

A new 1/1.7-inch 64MP image sensor

“Samsung is continuously pushing for innovations in pixel and logic technologies to engineer our ISOCELL image sensors to capture the world as close to how our eyes perceive them,” said Yongin Park, executive vice president of sensor business at Samsung Electronics. “Through close collaboration with Xiaomi, ISOCELL Bright HMX is the first mobile image sensor to pack over 100 million pixels and delivers unparalleled color reproduction and stunning detail with advanced Tetracell and ISOCELL Plus technology.”

Before the 108MP image sensor makes it to the market, though, a Xiaomi Redmi smartphone will be launched, with the also new ultra-high resolution 64MP camera technology. The 64MP Samsung ISOCELL GW1 sensor has high resolving power and uses a remosaic algorithm to produce ultra-clear 64MP shots in bright conditions. With the pixel-merging Tetracell technology, GW1 also delivers bright 16MP images under low-light conditions. Even when the print resolution is 72dpi, it is able to print a large, high quality poster up to 3.26 meters in height. The 1/1.7-inch image sensor is one of the largest so far on the market, ringing in 34% larger than the standard 48MP smartphone cameras seen on typical flagship devices.

Samsung, Fujifilm and now Xiaomi

Samsung’s GW1 sensor also adopts ISOCELL Plus technology, which replaces the original metal barrier formed over photodiodes with an innovative new material, minimizing optical loss and light reflection. It’s also equipped with a Dual Conversion Gain (DCG) technology, which converts light into an electric signal based on the ambient lighting conditions. Hence, under brighter conditions it uses a low ISO, and under dim ones it leverages a high ISO to achieve an optimal signal-to-noise ratio in the resulting photographs.

Samsung first announced its ISOCELL technology in 2013, which reduces color-cross talk between pixels by placing a physical barrier, allowing small-sized pixels to achieve higher color fidelity. Based on this technology, Samsung introduced the industry’s first 1.0um-pixel image sensor in 2015 and 0.9-pixel sensor in 2017. In June 2018, Samsung introduced an upgraded pixel isolation technology, the ISOCELL Plus.

ProVideo Coaliton published, back in 2018, a long article about the evolution of this technology from Samsung, stating then that “Samsung’s ISOCELL sensors can record slow motion video at 960fps, reduce the ‘jello-effect,’ capture real-time HDR and have Dual Pixel autofocus”. The technology was developed with help from Fujifilm, and now with Xiaomi, apparently Samsung’s new partner.

Mass production for Samsung ISOCELL Bright HMX will begin later this month, says the company. Xiaomi has not yet announced when it will release the new ultra-high megapixel smartphones.

The post Canon and Sony, step aside: Samsung has a 108 megapixel image sensor appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

Adobe’s August update adds ‘GPU Accelerate Editing’ to Lightroom Classic, Camera Raw

After accidentally publishing the announcement yesterday, today Adobe has officially released its August Photography update for Lightroom Classic CC and Adobe Camera Raw, bringing with it a number of improvements including GPU Accelerated Editing.

As explained in a post on the Adobe Blog, GPU Accelerated Editing allows ‘Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw take advantage of the more powerful graphics cards (GPUs) while editing, providing a smoother and more responsive experience.’ Specifically, Adobe says the acceleration will ‘more pronounced with larger resolution monitors (4k and above) as well as with more powerful GPUs.’

A screenshot of the new splash screen that will greet you after updating Lightroom Classic CC.

This update won’t fix all of the complaints lobbed at Lightroom Classic CC, but it does address one of the program’s biggest issues—speed.

We took the update for a quick spin on a 2016 Retina MacBook Pro with a Radeon Pro 455 2GB and Intel HD Graphics 530 GPUs and although it’s difficult to quantify the exact improvement, we immediately noticed adjustments made to Raw photos captured on a Canon EOS R were applied much faster than the previous version of Lightroom Classic CC. From small, incremental adjustments to large two-stop exposure adjustments, the image immediately adapted to the new settings—something not always possible before unless you were using Smart Previews to make edits.

A screenshot from Adobe showing the new PNG export module.

Aside from the GPU Accelerated Editing, both Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom Classic CC have gained PNG export support. Lightroom Classic CC has also received updates to the Library Module for improved navigation through folders, Color Labels for Collections and batch processing for HDR and panorama merges.

A screenshot from Adobe highlighting the new Color Labeling option for Collections.

Lightroom, Adobe’s cloud-centric photography ecosystem, has also gained a few new features in the August update, including the ability to recover deleted photos, improved search options, updated preset options and batch metadata edits. Some of these changes apply only to specific versions of Lightroom, so check out Adobe’s announcement post for full details.

Screenshots from Adobe showing off the new batch metadata editing on Lightroom for Android.

The August Photography update should be available through the Creative Cloud application. Additional details on ‘What’s New’ have been detailed by Adobe for Lightroom Classic, Camera Raw, Lightroom for Mac and Windows, Lightroom for iOS and Lightroom for Android.

Capturing One of the Most Unique and Interesting Buildings in the World

I recently had the chance to photograph one of the most interesting and unique buildings in the world. It’s called the Goetheanum, and I’m betting most people have never seen anything like it. Most of the pictures we see on a daily basis on Instagram or other social media platforms are very repetitive. The Goetheanum is certainly not that.

The Goetheanum is the world center for the anthroposophical movement, located in Dornach, Switzerland. The building was designed by Rudolf Steiner and named after Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It includes two performance halls (1500 seats), gallery and lecture spaces, a library, a bookstore, and administrative spaces for the Anthroposophical Society. Conferences focusing on topics of general interest or directed toward teachers, farmers, doctors, therapists, and other professionals are held throughout the year.

Its predecessor, also known as the Goetheanum, was destroyed by arson during the night of January 1st, 1923. The existing building was erected on the same site between 1925 and 1928. Both the present Goetheanum building and its precursor have been widely used as masterpieces of modern architecture.

Both versions of the building were designed by the esoteric Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy. Steiner’s architecture is characterized by a liberation from traditional architectural constraints, especially through departure from the right-angle as a basis for the building plan.

For the first Goetheanum, he achieves this in wood by employing boat builders to construct its rounded forms; for the second Goetheanum, by using concrete to achieve sculptural shapes on an architectural scale. The monolithic-organic building, often stylistically attributed to Expressionism, has a sculptural form that, according to Steiner’s vision, should express “the essence of organic design.”

Together with other stylistically similar buildings in the immediate vicinity, the Goetheanum—which has been a protected monument since 1993—forms an ensemble that is one of the cultural treasures of national importance in the canton of Solothurn. As a fundamental architectural model, the Goetheanum has also provided inspiration for the entire anthroposophical school of architecture, including, for example, the buildings of many Waldorf schools.


About the author: Matthias Dengler is photographer and high-end retoucher based in Nuremberg, Germany. You can find more of his work on his website, or by following him on Instagram, Behance, and YouTube. A version of this blog post was also published here.

Tarantino Hits Back At ‘Hollywood’s’ Bruce Lee Controversy

The Once Upon a Time In Hollywood director has some thoughts about how people are reacting to his new movie.

Film Twitter has been on the verge of obsessive behavior concerning Once Upon a Time In Hollywood and its revisionist history/nostalgic tour through the last glorious gasps of 1969 Hollywood. When fans aren’t talking about Quentin Tarantino’s take on the period, or Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio’s exceptional performances, or that ending, they’re sounding off on Bruce Lee’s role in the movie.

Read More

Instagram removes ad partner accused of harvesting huge trove of data on users

More than a year after Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook-owned Instagram has banned one of its vetted advertising partners, HYP3R, after it was allegedly caught scraping a huge amount of data on users. The claim comes from Business Insider, which published a report last week alleging that HYP3R was saving Instagram Stories and harvesting posts from public location pages to track users.

HYP3R is a location-based marketing platform, according to the firm’s website. Business Insider claims it spoke to ‘multiple former’ HYP3R employees on the company’s practices in addition to reviewing public documents and marketing materials. Though the amount of data the company allegedly scraped from Instagram remains unclear, sources told BI that ‘more than 90%’ of the company’s data on ’hundreds of millions of the highest value consumers in the world’ came from the social media platform.

Among other things, the marketing company was accused of building a tool that enabled it to download and save Instagram Stories related to locations of interest.

An Instagram security issue that allowed users to view public location page posts without logging in made HYP3R’s alleged data harvesting possible, the report claims. Among other things, the marketing company was accused of building a tool that enabled it to download and save Instagram Stories related to locations of interest.

As a consequence of this alleged action, BI claims that HYP3R was able to ‘build up detailed profiles of huge numbers of people’s movements, their habits, and the businesses they frequent over time.’

Instagram reportedly sent HYP3R a cease-and-desist letter after learning about the marketing firm’s alleged actions, telling BI in a statement that the ‘actions were not sanctioned and violate our policies.’ In addition to removing the advertiser from its platform, Instagram said, ‘We’ve also made a product change that should help prevent other companies from scraping public location pages in this way.’

Adobe adds “preliminary support” for the new Sony A7rIV and RX100VII

Adobe added “preliminary support” for the new Sony A7rIV and RX100VII: “Preliminary support means that the image quality and raw format support for the given camera model is not yet finalized and may be updated in a future release.” There…

The post Adobe adds “preliminary support” for the new Sony A7rIV and RX100VII appeared first on sonyalpharumors.