NEW K35 Primes by Servicevision

Those Full Frame Fanatics from Barcelona are at it again. The same Servicevision team who designed and built the FFA Scorpiolens Anamorphic 2x primes have developed a completely new series of lenses with matching characteristics, flares and bokeh to augment the original, venerable, vintage Canon K35 sets. These new lenses are called NEW K35 by Servicevision. The set includes a 15mm T1.5… read more…

Blackmagic Releases BMPCC 6K Footage (and It’s Remarkable)

With 12-Bit RAW with Dual Native ISO, the new BMPCC 6K offers a wide dynamic range.

Like everyone else last week, you may have been drooling over the notion of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K shooting 12-bit RAW. But if something was causing you to wait on ordering this compact 6K camera, Blackmagic has dropped a series of test footage clips to eliminate all doubt.

With its compact size, the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K packs a huge punch thanks to a larger Super35mm image sensor and the ability to shoot using an EF mount lens without the need of a speed booster adapter. It can shoot in 12-bit color using Blackmagic Raw, and with dual ISO, it has the same impressive dynamic range as its younger brother, the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. In fact, it’s essentially the same camera with an upgraded image sensor and lens mount. But that extra sensor real estate boosts image resolution to 6K, making it the first pocket-sized 6K camera.

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You’re Gonna Love DJI’s OSMO Mobile 3 and Its New Features

The compact design here offers several advanced features, including active tracking

When I wrote last week about Benro’s compact, folding handheld gimbal design, I had a hunch that DJI wouldn’t be too far behind with such a feature. It was inevitable that, with the mature nature of gimbals these days, designers would turn to ergonomics and how to make the gimbal more compact for storage and carrying. And that’s exactly what happened with the DJI Osmo Mobile 3. And while it’s still only a smartphone centric mobile device, it’s still got some great features that will entice mobile filmmakers to keep it in their bag.

“When we began designing Osmo Mobile 3, we went back to the drawing board with the goal of creating a portable yet intuitive product that uses the latest DJI technology,” said Paul Pan, Senior Product Manager. “We are excited to introduce DJI’s first gimbal with a folding design and hope it inspires our customers to imagine new ways of recording content with their mobile phones.”

Just about everything about the DJI Osmo Mobile 3 says “improvements.”

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You Need to Read the ‘Rear Window’ Script

The Rear Window screenplay is a masterclass in character and tension. Let’s break down the ways it sets the story up for success.

Alfred Hitchcock is the master of suspense. He can give you thrills, chills, and often delivers a movie worthy of audience applause. His usual formula? taking his time. Modern movies aren’t built that way much anymore. We often find ourselves barreling into exposition, character, in an effort to get to the plot.

But I think it’s time we show some appreciation for a movie that takes its time steeping you into all of the above, without much dialogue at all.

I’m talking about Rear Window.

Let’s look at how this classic script builds character, plot, tension and arcs everything while taking its time to deliver the best possible story.

Download the Rear Window Script PDF here!

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Terrence Malik Stands Up to Nazis (and Shoots Digital) In ‘A Hidden Life’ Trailer

The trailer for A Hidden Life reveals a Terrence Malick movie with plot and more gorgeous cinematography. How does he do it?

For some time, we went decades without a new Malick movie and now it seems like they’re popping up all over the place. Since Tree of Life planted the seeds, we’ve entered into the director’s most prolific period. The last few movies have been mixed bags, hwoever. They’ve all been beautiful to look out but none of them have broken out the way Tree of Life did with critics and at the box office.

So why are we excited about this first trailer for Malick’s A Hidden Life? Because this one seems to have his incredible trademark visuals as well as a ton of story. Oh, and it’s another WWII movie from the auteur.

Check out the trailer from Fox Searchlight and we’ll talk what he’s shooting on and the plot after.

“If our leaders, if they are evil, what does one do?”

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Photographer Finds Himself the Subject of a Social Media Witch Hunt After Taking Photos at a Fair, Accused of Pedophilia

Photographer Finds Himself the Subject of a Social Media Witch Hunt After Taking Photos at a Fair, Accused of Pedophilia

A Californian street photographer awoke to find himself the subject of a vicious, viral Facebook post filled with accusations that contained photos of his face. The post referred to him as a “P.O.S.” and insinuated he was a pedophile after he spent the afternoon documenting strangers, including families, at a county fair the day previous.

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5 Essential Writing Tips You Can Learn From ‘Parks and Rec’

Parks and Rec is one of the most successful TV comedies of all time. It’s a unique show that capitalized on an audience unsure how they felt about government.

The financial crisis in American hit in 2008. Suddenly, people were paying a lot more attention to the government. And guess what? None of it was funny.

Lucky for us, Michael Schur and Greg Daniels were off in a room somewhere, talking about TV show ideas. They pitched a bunch back and forth but kept going back to chasing a show that felt like The Office, but in the public sector. After they fleshed out that idea, it became Parks and Recreation, and the rest is history.

Check out the video from Behind the Curtain and let’s talk writing tips after the jump!

1. What does your character believe in? And who are they trying to convince?

One of the coolest things about Parks and Rec is that each character has a mission about who they are and what they want to accomplish. For Ron Swanson, that mission is nothing. For Leslie Knope, it’s everything.

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Photographer Creates Her Own Spacesuit for Fantasy Portrait

Photographer Creates Her Own Spacesuit for Fantasy Portrait

Anya Anti is an internationally published photo artist from the Ukraine who now lives in the Big Apple. If you have never seen her work, you are missing out on a whole series of quirky, interesting, and fantastical images that stir up emotion and imagination.

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The Art of the Cut Podcast Eps. 8 (w/ Oscar and ACE Eddie Nominated Editor Mark Goldblatt )

The Art of the Cut podcast brings the fantastic conversations that Steve Hullfish has with world renowned editors into your car, living room, editing suite and beyond. In each episode, Steve talks with editors ranging from emerging stars to Oscar and Emmy winners. Hear from the top editors of today about their careers, editing workflows and about their work on some of the biggest films and TV shows of the year.

Mark Goldblatt editing with a Moviola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Steve had a chance to speak with Mark Goldblatt. Mark started his career in the 1970’s and has since worked on legendary films such as James Camerons “The Terminator”, Michael Bays “Pearl Harbor”, “X-Men: The Last Stand” and most recently Eli Roths “Death Wish”. To hear more about Mark’s amazing career, listen to the full podcast below:

The Art of the Cut podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Anchor, Google Podcasts, Breaker, Pocket Casts, Overcast and Radio Public. If you like the podcast, make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app and tell a friend!

The post The Art of the Cut Podcast Eps. 8 (w/ Oscar and ACE Eddie Nominated Editor Mark Goldblatt ) appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

How to Be More Confident as a Photographer

How to Be More Confident as a Photographer

Confidence is one of those important attributes that are really useful for a photographer. While too much can definitely be a bad thing, not enough can dramatically reduce the opportunities you’ll have to make great work.

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Can a $40 FlexTILT 3D-Printed Head Compete With the $149 Original?

Can a $40 FlexTILT 3D-Printed Head Compete With the $149 Original?

Is 3D printing the next step in niche manufacturing for photography gear? How does a 3D-printed product stack up against its all-metal CNC’ed inspiration?

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Approved Media List for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K

Now that the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K, a new handheld digital film camera with a full Super 35 size 6K HDR image sensor, 13 stops of dynamic range, an EF lens mount and dual native ISO up to 25,600 for incredible low light performance is shipping from Blackmagic Design it is time for buyers to know exactly what media type is best for their new purchase. This is easy if you do not follow this extensive list of approved media complied by Blackmagic Design and your camera skips frames that is on you.

Pocket 6K

This new 6K model of the Pocket Cinema Camera 6K builds on the popularity of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K but has a larger Super 35 sensor size with 6K resolution, allowing higher image quality. The EF lens mount model works with a wide range of lenses from companies such as Canon, Zeiss, Sigma and Schneider to name a few. Bigger sensor. Higher Resolution. Canon EF Lens Mount. Those are the big differences. I also bet, if I were a betting man, that the approved media list for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K may be a slightly shorter list than approved media for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. Do not immediately expect what works in the 4K to work exactly the same in the 6K version. Just be smart and follow the approved list.

Pocket 6K

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 6K Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 50 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 60 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 2.8K 17:9 Blackmagic RAW 3:1 up to 120 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

The following CFast 2.0 cards are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

CinediskPro 510MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMAN64GA CFast 2.0 64GB
Hagiwara Solutions DC-SMANA1GA CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3500X CFast 2.0 128GB
Lexar Professional 3400X CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 510MB/s CFast 2.0 128GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 256GB
ProGrade Digital 550MB/s CFast 2.0 512GB
Transcend CFX650 CFast 2.0 TS128GCFX650 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-64G-x46D 64GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-128G-x46D 128GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-256G-x46D 256GB
SanDisk Extreme Pro CFast 2.0 SDCFSP-512G-x46D 512GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 256GB
Silicon Power CFX310 CFast 2.0 512GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G64 64GB
Sony CFast 2.0 G Series CAT-G128 128GB
Wise CFA-10240 3500X CFast 2.0 1TB

What SD cards should I use with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K?Pocket 6K

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 16:9 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 30 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 16:9 Blackmagic RAW 8:1 up to 30 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 12:1 up to 60 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Delkin Devices Power SDXC USH-II 64GB
Delkin Devices Prime SDXC USH-II 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 256GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB
Wise SD2-64U3 SDXC UHS-II 64GB

The following SD cards are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

Angelbird AV PRO SD V90 64GB
Delkin Devices Power SDXC USH-II 64GB
Delkin Devices Prime SDXC USH-II 128GB
Lexar Professional 2000x UHS-II 300MB/s SDXC 64GB
Lexar Professional 2000x UHS-II 300MB/s SDXC 128GB
ProGrade Digital V90 UHS-II 250MB/s SDXC 256GB
Sony Tough SF-G32T 32GB
Sony Tough SF-G64T 64GB
Sony Tough SF-G128T 128GB
Toshiba Exceria Pro UHS-II N502 SDXC 256GB
Wise SD2-64U3 SDXC UHS-II 64GB

What USB‑C drives should I use with Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K?Will the Komodo (dragon) eat the Blackmagic Pocket CC 6K?

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 6K Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 50 fps.

Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 6K 2.4:1 Blackmagic RAW 5:1 up to 60 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 2.8K 17:9 Blackmagic RAW 3:1 up to 120 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB-C drives are recommended for recording 4K DCI ProRes HQ up to 60 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 1TB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD 1TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The following USB‑C drives are recommended for recording 1080 ProRes 422 HQ up to 120 fps.

Samsung Portable SSD T5 250GB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 1TB
Samsung Portable SSD T5 2TB
SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD 1TB
Wise PTS-512 Portable SSD 512GB
Wise PTS-1024 Portable SSD 1TB

The post Approved Media List for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact router for emerging 8K workflows

AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact 32x32 12G-SDI router

Designed for use in broadcast, production and ProAV environments, the KUMO 3232-12G is AJA’s compact router solution for flexible and cost-efficient 12G-SDI routing. The KUMO is now shipping.

With the KUMO, says AJA, professionals can “get the the routing capabilities you need at a price that fits well within your budget. The company says that KUMO routers are so affordable they can even be used in place of traditional DAs to distribute signals to multiple locations. KUMO routers provide an incredible price/performance ratio while still maintaining the highest quality standards.

Designed for critical broadcast, production and post environments, KUMO routers are built to AJA standards that exceed SMPTE specifications. The use of premium components coupled with dual redundant power supplies ensures the highest signal quality and maximum uptime even in the unexpected event of a power supply failure.

For emerging 8K workflows

The KUMO 3232-12G supports large format resolutions, high frame rates and deep color formats, while reducing cable runs when transporting 4K/UltraHD over SDI. KUMO 3232-12G offers network-based and/or physical control and mirrors the form of AJA’s production-proven KUMO 3232 routers, with the additional benefit of a new USB port for configuring IP addresses via AJA’s eMini-Setup software. For emerging 8K workflows, KUMO 3232-12G is also equipped for multi-port gang-routing.

Key feature highlights include:

  • 12G-SDI inputs and outputs for up to 4K/UltraHD support at 60p
  • Small, portable 2RU form factor
  • Single cable support for streamlined 4K/UltraHD signal routing
  • Redundant power supply option
  • Configure and save up to eight salvos per router
  • Auto re-clocking SDI rates: 270 Mbps /1.483/1.485/2.967/2.970/5.934/5.940/11.868/11.880 Gbps
  • Support for AJA KUMO Control Panels (hardware, with direct connect or networked)
  • USB port to easily configure the router IP address and simplify initial network configurations
  • Embedded web server for remote control on any standard web browser
  • 5-year warranty and support

The KUMO 3232-12G is now available for $3995. For more information, visit AJA’s website.

The post AJA ships KUMO 3232-12G compact router for emerging 8K workflows appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

Is It Possible to Make Blogging Fun, Easy, and Efficient? Fstoppers Reviews Narrative

Is It Possible to Make Blogging Fun, Easy, and Efficient? Fstoppers Reviews Narrative

I think I’m right in saying that blogging, from choosing the images, to sorting, and uploading them, is the least fun part of running a photography business. So, is there a way to make this task less challenging, time consuming, but also make it work for our SEO? Take a look at our review of Narrative.

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Video: Debunking popular food photography ‘hacks’

Commercial food photographer Scott Choucino has published a new video debunking some of the food photography ‘hacks’ popularized in YouTube videos. Choucino comments on a variety of supposed industry techniques, including things like using lipstick to make fruit look ripe and spraying hairspray on fruit.

‘We don’t color in fruit if it’s the wrong color, we just buy more fruit,’ Choucino explains in the video while shrugging. The photographer shares some techniques that are used by food photography professionals, as well, including using glycerin and water — not hairspray — to make fruit look wet. Choucino likewise touches on the topic of making meat look cooked, getting gooey cheese pizza shots, myths about foamy coffee and more.

Algorithms Replaced Gatekeepers and Lowered the Bar on Quality

The rise of social media has had a massive impact on the art we see, consume, and interact with on a daily basis. Some of that impact was positive, some negative, but one of the most radical changes has also been one of the most detrimental: the demise of the gatekeepers.

Gatekeepers were the tastemakers of the past: the magazine editors, television produces, publishing executives, and gallery curators. In other words, the people who decided what work was seen and what remained in slush piles or piled up on the cutting room floor.

In their heyday, these powerful people made for a formidable obstacle and important line of defense. Nothing reached a broader audience without at least a partial stamp of approval.

Then came social media.

The Internet had already started democratizing the process of “getting noticed,” but “going viral” was still relegated to email forwards until Facebook came along with the news feed. Almost overnight, everybody had a platform, and the gatekeepers were stripped of their power. Anybody with an Internet connection could have their work explode. This popularity, in turn, meant major outlets had to share the work or risk being seen as stuffy and out of touch with their audience.

This change was positive at first. But what began as a refreshing influx of work that might never have been seen—creative people and creative ideas getting their due—turned into an overwhelming flood of content. Too little signal, too much noise. And so the same social media giants who displaced the gatekeepers came up with algorithms that would help sift through the mountains of content. Algorithms that prioritized popularity and shareability above all else.

Algorithms that, over time, have done more to stifle creative expression and bury important ideas than the gatekeepers ever did.

Photography has not been immune to this change. As iconic magazines folded, Instagram flourished. Infinite scroll and a screen in every pocket translates into an insatiable need for content. But not just content, popular content. Likable content. Shareable content.

Instagram and Facebook’s algorithms made sure this content made it to the top of your feed and got the most views. Marketing-savvy photographers saw this, and began shifting their style and strategy to coincide. The race to the lowest common denominator was on. Now, many photographers are more interested in “optimizing their social media strategy” than honing their craft or finding their creative voice.

Which article do you think performed better: “How to Grow your Instagram in 2019” or a thoughtful video on “The Artist’s Ego“?

It’s a catch-22. Artists create work because they want it to be seen. So which do you sacrifice: the integrity of your work, or its potential reach? Do you share something bland that will appeal to more people, or something true to your artistic vision that may never break through the algorithmic ceiling?

Let me be clear, the gatekeepers had it coming. The pre-algorithm age wasn’t some bastion of quality over quantity where everyone got a fair shot and the best work was immediately noticed and highlighted. If you knew someone who knew someone, you were much more likely to get “noticed”—still a reality in a lot of the art world and beyond. The rise of algorithms and the demise of traditional gatekeepers made sure that [almost] anybody’s work could be seen, appreciated, and explode into the public consciousness no matter their gender, the color of their skin, or whether their message was “sanctioned” by the people in power. But we lost something, too.

At their best, the gatekeepers of yesteryear were giants who recognized quality and placed the public interest ahead of their prejudices. People who elevated work that was interesting, innovative, or challenging. When Richard Rovere turned in an anti-segregation “Letter from Washington” to the New Yorker, founding Editor Harold Ross went on a bit of a racist tirade about it in the notes, but ultimately finished his note by writing, “I suppose we’ve got to print this…”

Recalling the experience later, Rovere wrote:

The man clearly despised what I had written for his magazine. He thought it was nonsense. To a degree, he regarded me as an enemy of his values. Yet the article was factually accurate, reasonably well written, and a serious piece of reporting by a man he had asked to cover Washington, and that, for Ross, was that.

Later, when E.J. Kahn, Jr. wrote an article defending two of his friends who were being attacked in the press as pro-communist, the conservative Ross again chose quality over personal prejudice. “Jesus Christ, Kahn, why did you have to write this goddamn piece?” he told Kahn. “Now I have to run it.” (Source)

These examples are obviously a bit removed from photography, but the point stands: People (some people) can evaluate the quality and impact of a piece of work—be it writing or photography—with a subtlety that escapes the most advanced artificial intelligence, to say nothing of the relatively simplistic algorithms that decide what you see in your Facebook and Instagram feeds. Has any algorithm ever overlooked its prejudice towards clicks?

Popular and sharable does not necessarily equal good; most of us can agree on that much (I hope). And while critics and tastemakers weren’t always been the best judges of what is, their evaluation of “good art” went far beyond the adolescent idea that “attention = quality.”

There is no going back to the days before social media, and I’m not even sure that we should. But I would love to go back to the days of chronological feeds, before social media algorithms undid some of the positive impact that social media initially made. These algorithms were born out of an interest in profit. More popular = more eyes = more ad clicks = more money. They weren’t a good idea when they were announced, and they aren’t a good idea now. Yet they continue to shape our perception of what’s worth our time and attention.

Out of sight, out of mind; when some of the best work remains out of sight, only clichés come to mind. Long exposure waterfalls. The solitary hiker on the craggy cliff overlooking the sunset or aurora borealis. A beautiful woman leading her companion by the hand through a lavender field. Text memes that are so popular they overwhelm the photography on a photo sharing platform, and Instagram is forced to purge accounts with 13M+ followers.

There’s no easy solution, but it’s our responsibility as individuals to occasionally bypass the algorithm and go digging through the slush pile. To create and appreciating exceptional and important work. To find great work that never got noticed and share it. To prioritize craft over clicks.

For better or worse, we have to be our own gatekeepers now.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K is a groundbreaking camera in features and in price.

Is The Future About More Than Just Cameras?

I recently attended the webinar that Blackmagic Design held to make four new products announcements. I have to admit that I didn’t know what Blackmagic Design was planning on introducing, so I went into the webinar with a clean slate without any pre-conceived notions about what they were going to intro. The rumor sites and grapevine had been basically silent about much new coming from Blackmagic Design, so this webinar was looking to be quite interesting. I wasn’t wrong; the announcements were significant and kind of covered a wide swath of product categories, both in hardware as well as software.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Announcing a 6K camera for $2,495, Blackmagic took a page out of the playbook known as a preemptive strike against competitor Panasonic with their $4,000 S1H 6K camera that won’t even be available until the fall of 2019.

A Preemptive Panasonic Strike?

As you’re probably aware, the big buzz from Cine Gear 2019 was Panasonic’s announcement of the S1H, a 6K FF mirrorless camera that will be available in the fall of this year. It will utilize Panasonic’s relatively new L lens mount, it’s 6K and has a lot of other tricks up its sleeve. The excitement was that the S1H looked to be the first native 6K camera in the $4,000 price range. Impressive, right? It looks as if Blackmagic Design CEO Grant Petty and company figured out a way to steal a lot of Panasonic’s thunder with the announcement of the new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K. It will sell for, wait for it…$2,495! Wow, kudos to Blackmagic Design, that’s a pretty impressive headline just for including the words Cinema, 6K and $2,495 in one breath. The other bullet points are:

  • 6144 x 3456 S35 Image Sensor.
  • 13 Stops Dynamic Range.
  • EF Lens Mount.
  • Dual Native ISO up to 25,600.
  • 5” LCD Touchscreen.
  • Internal Prores recording up to 4K.
  • 12-bit Blackmagic RAW in all formats up to 6K.
  • Built-in CFast and SD UHS-II card recorders.
  • USB C for recording to external SSDs.
  • Full-size HDMI for HDR and 10-bit output.
  • Mini XLR w 48v Phantom power.
Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K a 5” integrated LCD screen. Nope, it’s not a flippy screen.

A bit more about the rest of those 6K imager specs, it will shoot up to 50 fps at 6144×3456 16:9 or 60 fps at 6144×2560 2.4:1 and 60 fps at 5744×3024 17:9. For higher frame rates, you can shoot up to 120 fps at 2.8K 2868×1512 17:9. You can even work in true anamorphic 6:5 using anamorphic lenses in 3.7K 60 fps at 3728 x 3104.

Best of all, the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema 6K Camera is available now. Kudos to Blackmagic Design for announcing a shipping camera.

On to the next product announcement.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
A lot of the new features in Resolve 16.1 are in the Edit page.

They’ve Updated Resolve Again?

Blackmagic Design also announced DaVinci Resolve 16.1. The new features are focused mostly on the new cut page, which Blackmagic Design is continuing to work on in their goal to make it the world’s fastest editor, which as a FCP X user, I think they have their work cut out for them to claim that title as currently FCP X is by far the fastest editor on the market, followed closely by Resolve and AVID Media Composer with Premiere at the back of the pack as far as sheer editing speed.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Resolve has always been a world a class color correction and grading tool and continues that tradition in version 16.1.

So What Did They Change?

Changes in the bin now allow customers to place media in various folders and isolate clips from being used when viewing clips in the source tape, sync bin or sync window. Clips will be seen in all folders below the current level, and as customers navigate around the levels in the bin, the source tape will reconfigure in real-time. There’s even a menu for directly selecting folders in a customer’s project.

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 Features:

  • New public beta allows us to continue development.
  • New updates allow editors to improve sorting of media.
  • Smart Indicator adds UI feedback for intelligent edit features.
  • New cut clip tool allows instant cutting of clips in the timeline.
  • New button changes on DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard.
  • Boring Detector shows areas of the timeline that lack interest.
  • New Sync Bin organizes and displays sync media for easy shot selection.
  • Close up edit mode now includes face recognition to better frame shots.
  • New sync window allows manual syncing of clips or audio-based sync.
  • Multiple other improvements in editing, color, Fusion and Fairlight audio pages.
Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Resolve 16.1 is included free of charge with the purchase of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 6K Camera. See what Blackmagic design is doing there? Brilliant!

I personally can’t wait to put the “Boring Detector” through its paces. DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta is available now for download from the Blackmagic Design website.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini has a clean, simple front panel with a handy integrated LCD screen.

What Exactly Is An UltraStudio 4K Mini?

As you may or may not know, Blackmagic Design has a long history in building all kinds of cool, interesting and useful video convertor boxes of various types that do all kinds of cool, interesting useful things if you need to interface with, you know, real video tools like switchers for live television, projectors, recorders and other hardware.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
Available in three different configurations, the Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini will be useful in many different live and streaming workflows.

At $995, the UltraStudio 4K Mini is essentially a tool that gives you hardware connections to the outside world for editing, archiving from legacy old broadcast video decks (do you ever need to access HDCAM or formats like DVCPro or Digital Betacam?), outputting broadcast graphics to a switcher or even, most relevant for 2019, live streaming for webisodes, webcasts, Facebook Live and other streaming kinds of things. What has enabled all of this input/output power has been the advent and almost standardization of Thunderbolt 3.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic Ultrastudio 4K Mini rear panel features a plethora of inputs and outputs.

Some key features of the UltraStudio 4K Mini:

  • Analog connections.
  • Broadcast quality 8- and 10-bit high dynamic range capture in all formats up to 4K DCI at 60p, and 12-bit high dynamic range capture in all formats up to 4K DCI at 30p.
  • Push Button Controls.
  • Built-in LCD for monitoring signal and setup.
  • XLR Mic input.
  • ¼” headphone output.
  • USB input for keyboard and mouse.
  • Built-in SD card reader.
  • Thunderbolt 3 interface for 40 Gb/s capture and playback.
  • 3 models available with both portable and rack mount options.
  • Ideal for edit monitoring, live graphics, archive and streaming.
  • 12G‑SDI, HDMI 2.0, YUV/NTSC/PAL video and balanced audio.
  • Supports 45W trickle charging to a connected computer.
  • Supports all SD, 720p, 1080i, 1080p, 2160p and 4K DCI formats.
  • Front panel with LCD, mic input, headphone and SD card slot.
  • Compatible with DaVinci Resolve for editing, color, VFX and audio.
  • Supports DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro, Avid and more.
  • Includes support for Mac, Windows and Linux.

All in all, it seems like a pretty useful box that many users will find appealing for doing all kinds of different and unusual video workflows.

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
The Blackmagic RAW Speed Test will come in handy for many users. Yes, after years and years, it’s finally been updated!

The Finally Updated Blackmagic Design Speed Test?

Blackmagic Speed Test has been an industry-standard tool that many of us have counted on to check system data throughput for years. If you set up a new RAID and want to benchmark, the Blackmagic Design Speed Test has been an invaluable testing tool to get a real-world measurement so you know your new RAID’s speed capability.   

Blackmagic RAW Speed Test is a CPU and GPU benchmarking tool that users can use to test the speed of decoding full resolution Blackmagic RAW frames on their system. Multiple CPU cores and GPUs are automatically detected and used during the test so that customers get accurate and realistic results. Simply select Blackmagic RAW constant bitrate 3:1, 5:1, 8:1 or 12:1 and the desired resolution to perform the test. Although Blackmagic RAW Speed Test will run multiple resolution and frame rate tests on their system, customers can also select a specific test resolution to run on the main meters and the test will continue to run constantly, allowing stress testing of host computers.

Blackmagic RAW Speed Test Features:

  • Tests system performance of both CPUs and GPUs using Blackmagic RAW.
  • Blackmagic RAW based testing ensures more accurate performance results.

While not a huge new product innovation, the new Blackmagic Speed Test is a welcome new version that updates the older version with new tools and new capability. Also, it’s free on the Blackmagic Design website, which is very cool—who doesn’t like free?

Blackmagic Design: It’s All About Infrastructure
It’s difficult to know where our industry is going. Blackmagic Design definitely has an innovative business plan for how they’ll not only survive but also thrive in the new reality of video/digital cinema production.

What Does This All Mean For The Production Industry?

I don’t claim to be the Oracle of the video industry, but these new product announcements seem to indicate a few new ideas that occur to me about Blackmagic Design and their role within the industry. It’s 2019, and we have to acknowledge that video production is going through a lot of change right now. As predicted for the past few years, today we have amazingly sophisticated and capable products available that can do things that were inconceivable just a few short years ago.

What’s astounding is that we’re not only able to choose from all of these very capable products from dozens of different companies, we’re able to buy them for next to nothing. Products like the new Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema 6K camera must be giving the strategists and designers at Canon, Sony and Panasonic a lot of sleepless nights. I’d seriously question if it’s even worth introducing as many new cameras as these companies have in the past when the price floor is going so low for such high-end features. Sure, it doesn’t have built-in NDs and TC i/o exactly (although it does work with external TC generators like the Tentacle Sync Es!), but each new camera seems to include more and more professional-level features, so much so that the lines are blurring between consumer/producer and professional cameras quite a bit.

Time Travel

If you’d have told the average person in production that the hottest cinema camera in 2019 was a 6K capable, tiny, lightweight removable lens body that could record Prores at up to 4K and Blackmagic RAW at up to 6K, nobody would have believed that was possible. When you’d have told them that all of this could be had for a mere $2,495, they’d have shaken their heads. That’s significantly less money than a camera back accessory cost for your average cinema camera sold in 2010; for that money, you get the entire camera, add battery, lens and a media card and you’re shooting. It’s amazing.

The Bigger Picture

The other thing that I see Blackmagic Design doing is taking a page from the Apple playback of yore—they’re not becoming a camera company, and they’re becoming a system solution provider. Think about it, what other company in pro video/digital cinema makes the camera you shoot with, the editing software suite you edit with, the hardware interface that lets the editing program communicate with, ingest and playback almost any video format for live production, streaming and webcasting. They even make the benchmark software you use to optimize your GPU, CPU and drives/RAIDs. As far as I can think of, there’s no other company out there doing this, it’s smart, clever and makes great business sense. For the user, it’s a great benefit, Blackmagic Design is integrating their own version of RAW that works in their editing suite and there are several new features in Resolve that are specifically targeted to make it appealing to shoot with their new 6K, inexpensive camera.

It’s difficult to say what happens next in our business, but Blackmagic Design is making some bold moves that will put them into a powerful position against their competition. While I haven’t had my hands on the new Pocket Cinema 6K camera yet, I look forward to giving it a try and seeing what it can do for my own production pipeline. I’ve already been spending time in Resolve, so I look forward to trying out V16.1 too. Video production and digital cinema are headed into uncharted waters as far as the economic model, rates are down, production budgets are down, although the volume of production is up. Blackmagic Design has given users some valuable, affordable new tools to use in the reality of what’s happening in production.

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Are the Quasar Science Q-LED Lights the Best Video Lights for Your Money?

Are the Quasar Science Q-LED Lights the Best Video Lights for Your Money?

Wether you are a photographer or videographer, more and more content creators are adding constant lights as their go-to lighting setups. Quasar Science recently released their 30-watt T8 bulbs with raving reviews, and today, I explore six useful lighting setups you can build with four lights under $80 each.

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