Helpful Tips for Landing Videography Jobs

Helpful Tips for Landing Videography Jobs

Even when you’ve got the skills, the equipment, and the creative vision, it can be daunting trying to land a videography gig. This great video will give you some helpful advice to increase your chances of landing that next job.

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How to Use the Pen Tool in Photoshop

How to Use the Pen Tool in Photoshop

If you are new to Photoshop, the Pen Tool can be a bit difficult to master. Nevertheless, it is a tremendously useful tool, and it is well worth taking the time to learn how to use it. This helpful tutorial will show you how to get started with it.

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Having Fun With an Insane 16-Stop ND Filter

Having Fun With an Insane 16-Stop ND Filter

When you think of ND filters, you probably think of 3-stop or 6-stop filters or maybe even a 10-stop if you really want to go extreme. But what about a 16-stop filter? This fun video shows what it’s like working with such an insane filter.

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DaVinci Resolve 16.1 Public Beta 2 Released

Blackmagic announced the release of DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta 2. This update improves the close up edit feature by using DaVinci Neural Engine to automatically find faces, zoom in and reframe shots. It also adds support for BMPCC presets in the 3D camera and camera tracker tools, improved render status indicators for saver nodes and support for ACEScg as a gamut option, and more. In addition, Fusion Studio 16.1 Public Beta 2 makes adding images with different resolutions to OpenFX and ResolveFX plugins more stable, improves color dodge and burn tools, the white balance tool and more.

DaVinci Resolve 16.1. Source: Blackmagic

At the beginning of August, Blackmagic Design announced new promising camera and software products. Probably the most significant announcement was the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K (BMPCC 6K) – take a look at our Pocket 6K review and our BMPCC 4K and 6K comparison in case you missed it.

During their livestream on 8th August, Blackmagic also announced updates to their post-production software DaVinci Resolve. They announced the final release of DaVinci Resolve 16.0 and the new Resolve 16.1 public beta. The 16.1 public beta includes major updates to the Cut Page to help create the “world’s fastest editor”.

It brought new features like smart indicator, cut clip icon, boring detector, sync bin, and more. For more information about the new features of the Resolve 16.1 public beta please refer to this article.

Now after some user feedback, Blackmagic announced a new updated version – DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta 2. What is new?

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 Public Beta 2

The public beta 2 reflects all the user feedback from Resolve 16.1 beta. Blackmagic fixed numerous bugs and improved many new features. The update is free for all existing customers and the new Resolve 16.1 beta 2 can be downloaded for free directly from Blackmagic support center webpage.

In case you want to upgrade to the new 16.1 beta 2 from Resolve 15 or earlier, Blackmagic recommends to back up your database, both DiskDB and PostgreSQL if you use them, export your drp’s of your active projects and then restore the v15 DB before upgrading to v16 in preparation for the version upgrade as you can not go back to v15 with a v16 DB.

While there is no change of the database format from v16, DaVinci Resolve Studio 16.1 requires a firmware update for the DaVinci Resolve Micro and Mini Panels.

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 – Edit page. Source: Blackmagic

Here is a complete list of what’s new in DaVinci Resolve 16.1 beta 2:

Key Improvements

  • Support for quickly creating close up edits using facial recognition to automatically reframe and zoom in on faces
  • Support for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera presets in the Fusion Camera3D and CameraTracker tools
  • Support for retaining the original creation date metadata when restoring or importing projects
  • Support for tooltips to show track names in the edit page in the mini track view
  • Support for automatically selecting the newly added take in the take selector
  • Support for a 2.0:1 output blanking preset in the timeline menu
  • Support for user selectable audio sample rates for timeline renders
  • Support for Fujifilm F-Log colorspace
  • Support for additional flag and marker colors
  • Improved handling of clips with multiple faces when performing a close up edit in the cut page
  • Improved behavior when editing parameter values using Wacom tablets
  • Improved playback performance in the media, edit and cut pages
  • Improved scripting API with support for deleting a project
  • Improved responsiveness when scrubbing the in and out points for long clips in range editor on the cut page

Cut Page Improvements

  • Support for quickly creating create close up edits using facial recognition to automatically reframe and zoom in on faces
  • Improved handling of clips with multiple faces when performing close ups
  • Improved responsiveness when scrubbing the in and out points for long clips in range editor
  • Addressed an issue where resetting the speed tool in the cut page would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where adding a clip with in and out points from source tape using place on top would sometimes incorrectly skip the audio
  • Addressed an issue where waveform displays in source tape mode would show artifacts when one or more clips were offline
  • Addressed an issue where performing a close up on a still image would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where markers would get applied at an incorrect location when added after using timecode entry to change the playhead position
  • Addressed an issue where stopping playback in sync bin mode would sometimes not correctly refresh the viewer
  • Addressed an issue where Text+ titles in the Cut page would not show inspector controls correctly
  • Addressed an issue where the sync bin playhead would be positioned incorrectly at playback stop if there was no timeline
  • Addressed an issue where selecting an angle in the sync bin and applying trim in or trim out would apply it on the timeline
  • Addressed an issue where audio waveforms would be displayed incorrectly in source tape if some clips were offline

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 – Cut page. Source: Blackmagic

Edit Page Improvements

  • Support for tooltips to show track names in the mini track view
  • Support for automatically selecting the newly added take in the take selector
  • Improved dual screen behavior for the Edit page with support for single viewer and full height metadata and effects library
  • Addressed an issue where creating a timeline from a media pool selection would sometimes initialize incorrect audio track formats
  • Addressed an issue where the roll end to playhead action would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where inserting a clip in the Edit timeline would place the playhead in an incorrect position when Live Save was enabled
  • Addressed an issue where the new multicam dialog would not remember last used settings
  • Addressed an issue where the normalize audio levels dialog would not remember last used settings
  • Addressed an issue where selecting linked clips with an adjustment clip would sometimes cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where moving audio clips between tracks would sometimes not refresh the waveform color
  • Addressed an issue where marker annotations would not be drawn correctly for some zoom settings
  • Addressed an issue where the undo list would not show accurate text for some edit actions
  • Addressed an issue where audio waveforms would not update smoothly when modifying gain keyframes
  • Addressed an issue where opening an audio-only compound clip in the timeline would cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where audio would not play when performing dynamic trims in the Edit timeline
  • Addressed an issue where applying Fusion effects to retimed clips with freeze frames would sometimes show an incorrect freeze frame
  • Addressed an issue where angle names for sync clips would not be displayed correctly in the Edit page

Fusion Page Improvements

  • Support for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera presets in the Camera3D and CameraTracker tools
  • Addressed an issue where undoing an action from the application menu would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where adding images with different resolutions to some OpenFX or ResolveFX plugins would cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where Fusion color dodge and burn would produce inverted results if the input image had invalid values
  • Addressed an issue where the White Balance tool would sometimes show incorrect results when using GPU processing

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 – Fusion page. Source: Blackmagic

Color Page Improvements

  • Support for a 2.0:1 output blanking preset in the timeline menu
  • Support for Fujifilm F-Log colorspace
  • Addressed an issue where adjusting OpenFX parameters on a shared node would not correctly update the render cache
  • Addressed an issue where pre-clip and post-clip groups would incorrectly allow OpenFX parameters to be keyframed
  • Addressed an issue where adding a Fusion composition to an EXR file would cause Color mattes to behave incorrectly
  • Addressed an issue where switching between cut and color pages would not persist the video scopes dialog
  • Addressed an issue where trying to move multiple on-screen points in ResolveFX Warper would move only one point
  • Addressed an issue where dragging a node from the stills node graph dialog would not copy the node label
  • Addressed an issue where using Mac display color profiles alongside a Blackmagic Design playback device would sometimes cause intermittent black frames
  • Addressed an issue where the unmix mode would show incorrect previews for clips with straight alpha during playback
  • Addressed an issue where shot matching some clips with output cache in the color page would cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where the gallery view would not automatically scroll to reveal newly grabbed stills
  • Addressed an issue where exporting imported Dolby Vision metadata would only export the first trim for each clip
  • Addressed an issue where exporting imported Dolby Vision metadata would not preserve the original L2 values in a Dolby Vision 4.0 project
  • Addressed an issue where adjusting scopes parameters on some Windows systems would sometimes cause the viewer to show black frames

DaVinci Resolve 16.1 – Color page. Source: Blackmagic

Fairlight Page Improvements

  • Addressed an issue where EQ and dynamics on bus mixers would not being updated correctly when switching timelines or reloading projects
  • Addressed an issue where Alt/Option-clicking clip gain to add keyframes would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where dragging a stereo clip to a mono track in range mode would behave incorrectly
  • Addressed an issue where the timeline ruler could be dragged before the start of the timeline in some scenarios
  • Addressed an issue where the patch I/O dialog would not reflect changing audio input devices without an application restart on macOS
  • Addressed an issue where native input devices would not be detected in the patch I/O dialog when using a Blackmagic Design playback device
  • Addressed an issue where video scrollers would not be updated correctly when editing video in the Fairlight timeline
  • Addressed an issue where loudness graph would not be shown correctly for buses other than Main1
  • Addressed an issue where automation curves in Trim and Write modes would be represented in the same color
  • Address multiple issues with synchronized audio and video playback when using a Blackmagic Design playback device with the Fairlight Audio Accelerator
  • Addressed an issue where dragging media pool clips with custom audio track mapping to the Fairlight timeline would show incorrect waveforms
  • Addressed an issue where setting up a B-chain with more than 60 input and output channels would cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where changing a track name would not refresh all channels in the space view dialog

Media & Deliver Page Improvements

  • Support for user selectable audio sample rates for timeline renders
  • Addressed an issue where the pixel aspect ratio would not be read correctly from Blackmagic RAW files
  • Addressed an issue where decoding some H.264 clips would cause a crash on macOS
  • Addressed an issue where decoding some H.264 clips would show the last frame as offline
  • Addressed an issue where exporting AAF timelines with muted tracks would sometimes cause a crash on macOS systems
  • Addressed an issue where rendering DCP packages in the individual clips mode would incorrectly show errors about audio formats
  • Addressed an issue where renders could be accidentally stopped by selecting a render preset from the MacBook Pro Touch Bar
  • Addressed an issue where some DNxUncompressed clips rendered from DaVinci Resolve would be decoded with incorrect levels
  • Addressed an issue where updating a render job referencing a deleted timeline would sometimes cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where saving a new project with a render job would sometimes cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where rendering using Resolve in headless mode would not work correctly
  • Addressed an issue where uploading clips with accented file names to Frame io, YouTube or Vimeo would sometimes fail

General Improvements

  • Support for retaining the original creation date metadata when restoring or importing projects
  • Support for additional flag and marker colors
  • Improved behavior when editing parameter values using Wacom tablets
  • Improved playback performance in the media, edit and cut pages
  • Improved scripting API with support for deleting a project
  • Addressed an issue where plugging in a monitor and switching to dual screen mode would sometimes cause a crash
  • Addressed an issue where launching the preferences dialog using the shortcut would not work when the language was set to Portuguese
  • Addressed an issue where changing decode quality for a clip would cause corresponding thumbnails in the People dialog to be incorrect
  • Addressed an issue where custom keyboard shortcuts would not work correctly in the full screen viewer
  • General performance and stability improvements

Did you test DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta? If yes, how did you like it? Let us know in the comments below the article.

Source: Blackmagic Design

The post DaVinci Resolve 16.1 Public Beta 2 Released appeared first on cinema5D.

How a Professional Landscape Photographer Composes a Photo

How a Professional Landscape Photographer Composes a Photo

One of the more nuanced and difficult aspects of landscape photography is composition. This excellent video features a professional landscape photographer as he talks through how he chose the compositions for two of his images.

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Lens Rentals Declares the Tamron 35mm f/1.4 Lens the Most Optically Superior Ever Tested

Lens Rentals Declares the Tamron 35mm f/1.4 Lens the Most Optically Superior Ever Tested

The 35mm focal length is one of the most commonly used by photographers, and it is a crowded space for manufacturers. Lens Rentals recently completed optical tests on Tamron’s SP 35mm f/1.4 Di USD lens, and perhaps surprisingly, it has beaten out all of the competition.

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The Five Camera Controls a Photographer Should Master

The Five Camera Controls a Photographer Should Master

When you are new to photography, the veritable plethora of controls on a modern camera can be a bit overwhelming. This helpful video tutorial will show you which controls and settings you should focus on the most to master your camera and take more ownership of your creative process.

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A Review of the Samyang AF 45mm f/1.8 Lens for Sony FE

A Review of the Samyang AF 45mm f/1.8 Lens for Sony FE

A few years ago, Samyang was known for producing cheap but quality lenses that used manual focus only and were particularly loved by astrophotographers. Recently, they’ve started to branch out into creating autofocus lenses. Does their 45mm lens for Sony shooters maintain that optical quality while adding good autofocus performance? This great video review answers that question.

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Shoot as if Your Free Time Were a Documentary

Shoot as if Your Free Time Were a Documentary

During our free time, we often tend to hunt for the big shots and the most impressive images. To become better photographers, we also need to develop our view for the little stories on our path.

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Fstoppers Photographer of the Month (August 2019): Kevin Plovie

Fstoppers Photographer of the Month (August 2019): Kevin Plovie

The Fstoppers community is brimming with creative vision and talent. Every day, we comb through your work, looking for images to feature as the Photo of the Day or simply to admire your creativity and technical prowess. In 2019, we’re featuring a new photographer every month, whose portfolio represents both stellar photographic achievement and a high level of involvement within the Fstoppers community.

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Hubble Snaps a Beautiful New Portrait of Jupiter

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured a new portrait of Jupiter that shows the gas giant’s details, including the Great Red Spot, in a more intense color palette than in the past.

The photo was captured back on June 27th, 2019, and just published this month by NASA. The telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 shot the imagery in visible light while Jupiter was 400 million miles away from Earth and almost directly opposite the Sun in the sky (something known as “opposition”).

Here’s NASA’s description of what’s seen in the shot:

Among the most striking features in the image are the rich colors of the clouds moving toward the Great Red Spot, a storm rolling counterclockwise between two bands of clouds. These two cloud bands, above and below the Great Red Spot, are moving in opposite directions. The red band above and to the right (northeast) of the Great Red Spot contains clouds moving westward and around the north of the giant tempest. The white clouds to the left (southwest) of the storm are moving eastward to the south of the spot.

All of Jupiter’s colorful cloud bands in this image are confined to the north and south by jet streams that remain constant, even when the bands change color. The bands are all separated by winds that can reach speeds of up to 400 miles (644 kilometers) per hour.

On the opposite side of the planet, the band of deep red color northeast of the Great Red Spot and the bright white band to the southeast of it become much fainter. The swirling filaments seen around the outer edge of the red superstorm are high-altitude clouds that are being pulled in and around it.

The Great Red Spot is a towering structure shaped like a wedding cake, whose upper haze layer extends more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) higher than clouds in other areas. The gigantic structure, with a diameter slightly larger than Earth’s, is a high-pressure wind system called an anticyclone that has been slowly downsizing since the 1800s. The reason for this change in size is still unknown.

The new portrait was captured as part of the Outer Planets Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which provides yearly global views of the outer planets in our solar system. The photos help astronomers study changes in things like storms, winds, and clouds.

(via NASA via DPReview)

Maybe You Should Be Using Lightroom For That

Maybe You Should Be Using Lightroom For That

Lightroom isn’t a perfect tool. However, for some users, it is a perfect fit. If you are just getting into editing tools, left Lightroom during the change to Adobe Cloud, or practice photography professionally, there’s a number of reasons Lightroom might be a perfect fit for you.

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Tamron 35mm f/1.4 ‘Optically the Best 35mm Lens You Can Get’: LensRentals

Roger Cicala over at LensRentals has been doing extensive MTF tests on lenses to figure out the landscape of optical quality in the camera industry. One of his latest findings may be a surprise to many: the best 35mm lens on the market optically is one made by Tamron.

Cicala says he went into his MTF test of the Tamron SP 35mm f/1.4 Di USD lens expecting it to be “pretty good at an excellent price.” The lens is a top-of-the-line lens by Tamron that costs just $899, significantly less than its rival lenses by Canon and Nikon, which both retail for $1,699, and equal to the Sigma equivalent.

“The Tamron wins at most initials in the name, which I know is important to them, but other than that I expected this portion of the post to be about ‘worth the money’,” Cicala writes. “What I got, though, was DAMN THAT’S GOOD! Great center sharpness, maintains sharpness well out to the edges, very little separation between sagittal and tangential lines.”

Here’s what the Tamron’s MTF chart looks like next to the Canon 35mm f/1.4L II’s test chart:

“The $900 Tamron is clearly a bit better than the [$1,700] Canon, which makes it better than the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 G or Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art,” Cicala says.

It’s important to note that Cicala only tests for the resolution of lenses, and Tamron’s offering may or may not fall short of its rivals in other areas such as autofocus, durability, weather-sealing, and bokeh.

But in the area of resolution, Tamron has hit a home run.

“As is so often the case, my expectations were, uhm, less correct than they might have been,” Cicala concludes. “I expected the Tamron to be a nice lens at a good price. Instead, it is, for the moment, optically the best 35mm lens you can get, and at a price that should make you want to get it […]

“Tamron is suddenly tossing out world-class lenses.”

The New Sony a6600: Flagship or Missed the Boat?

I normally don’t write articles discussing new camera bodies like the Sony a6600, nor do I often get into fine detail on camera specs in general. But since I have been shooting with a Sony a6300 for a few years already, and have been eagerly wanting to upgrade to a newer Sony camera, I feel it is a good time for me to jump in on the subject.

In New York, three days ago, Sony announced two new camera bodies to their long standing a6000 series lineup. The new budget a6100 and, what Sony are calling their new crop sensor (APS-C) Flagship camera, the a6600.

One of the main reasons I am keen to upgrade my a6300 is because I use it primarily as a small and lightweight travel camera, but I also use it for some of my video work. So, I would like a camera with newer sensor technology, meaning one that captures lower noise at high ISO settings (in low light). Plus I would like a camera that has two SD memory card slots for an instant backup while shooting (to hedge against a memory card failure and possible loss of photos) while I’m traveling. And I would really like to be able to capture 4K video at 60 frames per second to be able to create some 4K slow-motion footage. But since neither the a6100 nor the a6600 offer any of these upgrades, I am rather disappointed and my interest in these two new cameras from Sony more or less stops here.

But for those of you who might be in the market for a new mirrorless camera, one like the a6600, I will go on to explain why I feel Sony still missed the boat on their latest flagship camera offering.

First, let me discuss the few new improvements added to the a6600 camera. The a6600 does now have IBIS (in-body image stabilization), which Sony refers to as “Steady Shot” technology. It also does have a slightly improved auto-focus tracking system for video, and slightly better color science for its color profile settings as well. Physically it also has a bigger battery, which means longer battery life (nearly double that of the smaller Sony a6000 series batteries), a headphone jack has been added, a flip-up function to the camera’s preview screen has also been added, and a bigger and more ergonomic camera grip has been implemented.

The limitations of the a6600 though outweigh the pluses. I say this because in many ways Sony hasn’t really added much new technology to this seemingly new camera. To start with, it employs rather old camera sensor technology. It is simply using the same sensor that was developed 3 years ago for my Sony a6300. This means the a6600 gets no increase in image capture resolution, no improvement to low light shooting capabilities, and no increase in dynamic range either.

Sony is also offering only a 2.3-million-pixel resolution electronic viewfinder (EVF) in the new a6600. This is considered under-powered when compared to EVFs of some of the other mirrorless cameras already being offered on the market.

Sony has indeed added IBIS functionality to the a6600 as I mentioned, but the IBIS technology is also nearly 3-year-old Sony technology (and with no improvements made to it) as it was taken right from their older Sony a6500 model. Sony has never really been known for their IBIS technology to begin with, and it needs to be improved, so it is disappointing to see no advances have been made to their technology in this area either.

As for some of the other new features added to the a6600; the headphone jack seems like a basic function essential to all video shooters and something that Sony should have included since the a6300. And the flip-up screen is still not great because it doesn’t flip out to the side, which is what is really needed if you want to be able to see the screen more easily while capturing video footage of yourself.

And if you attach an external microphone to the hot-shoe of the camera (for recording better audio), then the screen becomes blocked by the placement of the microphone and is no longer visible from the front of the camera while shooting. So a side flip-out screen would have solved this problem.

But the big question is, all things considered, is the a6600 worth the price or can you simply do better by buying a different camera instead? The short answer is the a6600 is a “no” on its price and a “yes” on you being better off choosing to buy something else.

The price of the a6600 body is US$1,400. This is considered a lot of money for a crop sensor mirrorless camera in 2019, especially when they are using old sensor technology and not offering features like 4K video at 60 frames per second or dual SD card slots (like both Fuji and Panasonic do on some of their mirrorless bodies). And for just a bit more money, you can also buy Sony’s a7 III camera body, which employs a larger, and better quality, a full-frame image sensor.

As for other options, the one-year-old Sony a6400, which has very similar specs and technology to the a6600, costs $500 less than the a6600 and would seem like a better option at this time. The a6400 does not have IBIS, but the IBIS from Sony isn’t great anyway as I mentioned, so no big sacrifice there. But if you really want Sony’s Steady Shot technology, then the older Sony a6500 for $200 less is a slightly lower cost option as well.

In the same price range of the a6600 you can also consider the one-year-old Fuji XT-3 mirrorless APS-C sensor camera. This is a fantastic alternative which does offer two SD card slots, 4K video shooting at 60 frames per second, a much higher resolution EVF than the a6600, a slightly higher resolution image sensor than the Sony (which is also better than Sony’s APS-C sensor when shooting in low light), and a wider range of lens options as well.

Sony’s autofocus tracking technology may be slightly more advanced than Fuji’s, and Fuji’s XT-3 doesn’t offer IBIS (like the a6600 has), but I feel these are minor differences when comparing the key specs of the older XT-3 against the newer a6600.

So there you have it. I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions down below on all of this. And please let me know if you are planning to buy an a6600, or perhaps another crop sensor mirrorless camera in the near future.


About the author: Marc Schultz is a travel and commercial photographer who writes a blog about various aspects of photography during his free time. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. To read more of his writing visit the Marc Schultz Photography Blog. This article was also published here.

Nikon D6 Announcement Rumored to Be Coming September 4. Where’s Canon?

Nikon D6 Announcement Rumored to Be Coming September 4. Where’s Canon?

Nikon is anticipated to announce the upcoming release of the D6 next week. The actual release isn’t expected to follow until late 2019 or early 2020. This is in line with what’s expected to be a paring down of their DSLR line-up to focus on higher-end models. What should we expect from Canon in return?

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Sony a6600 sample gallery from DPReview TV

DPReview TV was at the launch event for the new Sony a6600, and host Chris Niccolls had a chance to shoot with the camera around New York’s Coney Island. Here’s a gallery of some of his favorite shots using Sony’s new APS-C lenses.