Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM

Canon has expanded its RF lens range with the launch of the full frame RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM. This all-in-one compact travel lens offers a 24-240mm 10x zoom range that gives users the ability to capture anything from wide-angle shots to telephoto close-ups. Following the development announcement of six RF lenses in February and … Continued

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Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III & G5 X Mark II

Canon has announced the PowerShot G7 X Mark III and G5 X Mark II, two new cameras in the PowerShot G series. Both cameras offer high-speed continuous shooting and the ability to shoot in 4K UHD with no crop. Both cameras supposedly also have a built-in ND filter. According to Canon’s press release, they state … Continued

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Insta360 Prime Day Deals

Insta360 has announced their big reals for the upcoming Amazon Prime Day Deals which is happening next week on July 15 & 16. One to note is the Insta360 One X which is 15% off for the first time since launch. In addition to the One X, they also have a few discounts on their … Continued

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Blackjet™ TX-1S Thunderbolt 3 Sony SxS Reader

Atech Flash Technology has announced the new Blackjet™ TX-1S Thunderbolt 3 Sony SxS reader. The card reader supports the following media:SxS PRO X SeriesSxS PRO+ SeriesSxS PRO SeriesSxS -1 Series This means that the reader is not compatible with the more recent AXS cards which provide even faster data rates for RAW workflows. No pricing … Continued

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Canon PowerShot G5 X II and G7 X III Compact Cameras Announced

Canon PowerShot G5 X II and G7 X III Compact Cameras Announced

Canon has just announced updated models to their popular PowerShot G5 X and G7 X series cameras. While the G5 X II receives refinement through a slimmed down body and enhanced capabilities, the G7 X III takes aim at being the best camera for vlogging.

[ Read More ]

Canon RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM Officially Announced

Canon RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM Officially Announced

First teased earlier this year along with five other RF lenses in development at that time, the RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM lens has now been officially announced with more details and will start shipping next month.

[ Read More ]

Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II has fast 24-120mm equiv. lens and pop-up EVF

The nearly four-year-old PowerShot G5 X has received a complete overhaul in the form of the G5 X Mark II. Nearly everything has changed, including the design, which is very similar to the G7 X Mark III which was also announced today. And, unless you’ll miss the SLR-style of the original model, that’s probably a good thing.

At the heart of the camera is a 1″-type, 20MP Stacked CMOS sensor, which up until now has been exclusive to Sony cameras, along with Canon’s latest Digic 8 processor. The lens is one of the most ambitious in its class, with an equivalent focal range of 24-120mm and max aperture of F1.8-2.8. As with the G7 X III, there’s a ‘clicky’, customizable control dial around the lens.

The Mark II’s party trick is its pop-up OLED electronic viewfinder, which should look very familiar to anyone who’s seen a Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III and newer. With your eye to the finder you can move the focus point via the touchscreen LCD, which can tilt upwards by 180°.

Like the G7 X III, the G5 X II can shoot Raw bursts at 30 fps with a 0.5 sec pre-buffer using its electronic shutter. If you want continuous AF, the burst speed drops to 8 fps. Video can be captured at 4K/30p (but not 24p) without a crop, with Full HD recording at up to 120p.

Other features of note include an improved UI, similar to that of EOS cameras, new ‘Star modes’ and ‘simpler’ Wi-Fi setup.

Battery life is not the camera’s strong point, with a CIPA-rated 230 shots per charge using the LCD and 180 shots with the EVF. The camera does support power delivery over its USB-C socket, though.

The PowerShot G5 X Mark II will be available in August for $899.

Press Release

UPGRADE YOUR VISUAL STORYTELLING TOOLS WITH TWO NEWLY ENHANCED POWERSHOT G-SERIES CAMERAS FROM CANON

The PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II are the New Powerhouse Cameras for Visual Creators and Advanced Amateurs

MELVILLE, N.Y., July 8, 2019 – Ansel Adams, one of the greatest landscape photographers once said, “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” Never have truer words been spoken as digital photography has evolved and storytelling is shared through multiple mediums. Providing visual storytellers more options to bring their imaginative visions to life, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, introduces the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II cameras. Successors to the PowerShot G7 X II and PowerShot G5 X respectively, these new cameras usher in a plethora of new and innovative functionalities. Depending on the model, new innovative features include live-streaming available with YouTube* (via wireless connection), a pop-up electrical viewfinder (EVF) and 4K video shooting.

“Creators and photographers of all levels are reinventing the way stories are told and, as technology has progressed, so have the diverse needs of our customers,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “With features such as live-stream to YouTube* and a pop-up EVF, the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II are true testaments to the company’s commitment to integrate the latest advancements for those who choose to digitally stream their journeys with the world or seek to scale and capture the highest peaks.”

Even though the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II have many individualized, unique qualities, both include many core features that are true to Canon’s imaging excellence. These features include:

  • DIGIC 8 Imaging Processor
  • 20.1 Megapixel** 1.0-inch stacked CMOS sensor to achieve high image quality, high functionality and fast speeds
  • 4K up to 30p, Full HD up to 60p, FHD up to 120p, HDR, high frame rate movie with no crop
  • High-speed continuous shooting at a maximum of 20 FPS
  • Highest ISO speed in the PowerShot category with a maximum of 12,800
  • Wi-Fi®1 and Bluetooth®2 connectivity
  • USB-C charge power supply

Craft Your Own Unique Visual Voice with the PowerShot G7 X III

Calling all YouTube creators, the PowerShot G7 X III is primed to be the next-generation vlogging camera. The PowerShot G7 X III features live-streaming to YouTube** capability via a wireless connection, allowing for creators of all levels to easily capture and post content in real time. The PowerShot G7 X III also offers vertical video support***, 4K up to 30P high-rate movie with no crop, full HD up to 120p, and an optical 4.2x lens, helping to achieve high image quality. Powered by the company’s DIGIC 8 image processor, a new 20.1 Megapixel** sensor, and wrapped within a compact body with a microphone jack, the PowerShot G7 X III offers innovative technologies, an improved user interface and Creative Assist for both video and still photography needs.

Capture on-the-go with the PowerShot G5 X Mark II

A lighter, compact and premium point and shoot camera that touts a new pop-up EVF, touch and drag AF and new optical 5x lens, the PowerShot G5 X Mark II is perfectly positioned to provide high image quality and valuable functions. From trekking through various terrains of Patagonia where users can leverage the new panoramic shot feature, to capturing key moments with loved ones, the PowerShot G5 X Mark II will satisfy the needs of advanced amateurs who regularly use and are familiar with Canon EOS cameras as a second camera or integrate it into their daily lives.

The PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II have an estimated retail price of $749.99 and $899.99†, respectively and are expected to be available in August 2019. For more information and the full list of product specifications, visit http://shop.usa.canon.com/

Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II specifications

Price
MSRP $899
Body type
Body type Compact
Sensor
Max resolution 5472 x 3648
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 20 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 21 megapixels
Sensor size 1″ (13.2 x 8.8 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Processor DIGIC 8
Color space sRGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
White balance presets 6
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization Optical
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.) 24–120 mm
Optical zoom 5×
Maximum aperture F1.8–2.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Digital zoom Yes (4x)
Manual focus Yes
Normal focus range 5 cm (1.97)
Macro focus range 5 cm (1.97)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,040,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic
Viewfinder coverage 100%
Viewfinder resolution 2,360,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/2000 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/25600 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Aperture priority
  • Shutter priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Self Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Panning
  • Star Portrait
  • Star Nightscape
  • Star Trails
  • Star Time-Lapse Movie
  • Handheld Night Scene
  • High Dynamic Range
  • Fireworks
  • Standard Movie
  • Short Clip
  • Manual Movie
  • Time-Lapse Movie
  • iFrame Movie
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 7.50 m
External flash No
Flash modes Auto, on, slow synchro, off
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive 30.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs, custom)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Modes
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30p / 120 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 120p / 120 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 60 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 30 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-I compatible)
Connectivity
USB USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 GBit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth
Remote control Yes (via smartphone or wireless remote)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description NB-13L lithium-ion battery and charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 230
Weight (inc. batteries) 340 g (0.75 lb / 11.99 oz)
Dimensions 111 x 61 x 46 mm (4.37 x 2.4 x 1.81)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

Canon PowerShot G7 X III features Stacked CMOS sensor and live video streaming

Canon has introduced its PowerShot G7 X Mark III, an enthusiast compact with a neat trick up its sleeve: live video streaming. The Mark II has long been a favorite of vloggers, thanks to its compact size and tilting LCD, and now they can stream live video over YouTube at the push of a button.

The physical design of the Mark III is the same as its predecessor, though it’s a bit lighter. While the lens remains the same as before (24-100mm equiv. F1.8-2.8), the camera has an all-new sensor: a 1″ 20MP Stacked CMOS, which up until now was a Sony exclusive. Powered by Canon’s Digic 8 processor, the G7 X Mark III can shoot Raws at a blazing 30 fps with AE/AF locked, though the burst rate drops down to 8.3 fps if you want continuous AF.

The G7 X Mark III can capture 4K/30p video with no crop, and 1080 video at up to 120p

As before, the G7 X Mark III has a 3″ touchscreen that tilts all the way up for selfies or vlogging. Canon has added an on-screen movie record button, in another nod to vloggers. The camera can capture 4K/30p video with no crop, and 1080 video at up to 120p. The Mark III can record vertical videos, though not for live streaming purposes. The camera has an external mic input, but no headphone socket. The customizable control dial around the lens is ‘clicky’, which you probably won’t want to use when capturing video.

Battery life is modest, with a CIPA-rated number of 235 shots per charge: and that’s without live streaming. The camera can be powered by a portable battery pack via USB-C though, which might make that low number less of an issue.

The PowerShot G7 X Mark III will be available in August for $749, with a choice of black or silver bodies.

Press Release

UPGRADE YOUR VISUAL STORYTELLING TOOLS WITH TWO NEWLY ENHANCED POWERSHOT G-SERIES CAMERAS FROM CANON

The PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II are the New Powerhouse Cameras for Visual Creators and Advanced Amateurs

MELVILLE, N.Y., July 8, 2019 – Ansel Adams, one of the greatest landscape photographers once said, “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” Never have truer words been spoken as digital photography has evolved and storytelling is shared through multiple mediums. Providing visual storytellers more options to bring their imaginative visions to life, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, introduces the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II cameras. Successors to the PowerShot G7 X II and PowerShot G5 X respectively, these new cameras usher in a plethora of new and innovative functionalities. Depending on the model, new innovative features include live-streaming available with YouTube* (via wireless connection), a pop-up electrical viewfinder (EVF) and 4K video shooting.

“Creators and photographers of all levels are reinventing the way stories are told and, as technology has progressed, so have the diverse needs of our customers,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “With features such as live-stream to YouTube* and a pop-up EVF, the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II are true testaments to the company’s commitment to integrate the latest advancements for those who choose to digitally stream their journeys with the world or seek to scale and capture the highest peaks.”

Even though the PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II have many individualized, unique qualities, both include many core features that are true to Canon’s imaging excellence. These features include:

  • DIGIC 8 Imaging Processor
  • 20.1 Megapixel** 1.0-inch stacked CMOS sensor to achieve high image quality, high functionality and fast speeds
  • 4K up to 30p, Full HD up to 60p, FHD up to 120p, HDR, high frame rate movie with no crop
  • High-speed continuous shooting at a maximum of 20 FPS
  • Highest ISO speed in the PowerShot category with a maximum of 12,800
  • Wi-Fi®1 and Bluetooth®2 connectivity
  • USB-C charge power supply

Craft Your Own Unique Visual Voice with the PowerShot G7 X III

Calling all YouTube creators, the PowerShot G7 X III is primed to be the next-generation vlogging camera. The PowerShot G7 X III features live-streaming to YouTube** capability via a wireless connection, allowing for creators of all levels to easily capture and post content in real time. The PowerShot G7 X III also offers vertical video support***, 4K up to 30P high-rate movie with no crop, full HD up to 120p, and an optical 4.2x lens, helping to achieve high image quality. Powered by the company’s DIGIC 8 image processor, a new 20.1 Megapixel** sensor, and wrapped within a compact body with a microphone jack, the PowerShot G7 X III offers innovative technologies, an improved user interface and Creative Assist for both video and still photography needs.

Capture on-the-go with the PowerShot G5 X Mark II

A lighter, compact and premium point and shoot camera that touts a new pop-up EVF, touch and drag AF and new optical 5x lens, the PowerShot G5 X Mark II is perfectly positioned to provide high image quality and valuable functions. From trekking through various terrains of Patagonia where users can leverage the new panoramic shot feature, to capturing key moments with loved ones, the PowerShot G5 X Mark II will satisfy the needs of advanced amateurs who regularly use and are familiar with Canon EOS cameras as a second camera or integrate it into their daily lives.

The PowerShot G7 X III and the PowerShot G5 X Mark II have an estimated retail price of $749.99 and $899.99†, respectively and are expected to be available in August 2019. For more information and the full list of product specifications, visit http://shop.usa.canon.com/

Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III specifications

Price
MSRP $799
Body type
Body type Compact
Sensor
Max resolution 5472 x 3648
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 20 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 21 megapixels
Sensor size 1″ (13.2 x 8.8 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Processor DIGIC 8
Color space sRGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
White balance presets 6
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization Optical
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v2.3)
  • Raw (Canon CR3)
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.) 24–100 mm
Optical zoom 4.2×
Maximum aperture F1.8–2.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Digital zoom Yes (4x)
Manual focus Yes
Normal focus range 5 cm (1.97)
Macro focus range 5 cm (1.97)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,040,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type None
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/2000 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/25600 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Self Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Panning
  • Star Portrait
  • Star Nightscape
  • Star Trails
  • Star Time-Lapse Movie
  • Handheld Night Scene
  • High Dynamic Range
  • Fireworks
  • Standard Movie
  • Short Clip
  • Manual Movie
  • Time-Lapse Movie
  • iFrame Movie
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 7.00 m
External flash No
Flash modes Auto, on, slow synchro, off
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive 30.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs, custom)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Modes
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30p / 120 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 120p / 120 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 60 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 30 Mbps, MOV, H.264, AAC
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-I compatible)
Connectivity
USB USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 GBit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth
Remote control Yes (via smartphone or wireless remote)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description NB-13L lithium-ion battery and charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 235
Weight (inc. batteries) 304 g (0.67 lb / 10.72 oz)
Dimensions 105 x 61 x 41 mm (4.13 x 2.4 x 1.61)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM arrives in September for $900

Canon has officially unveiled the RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM, a telezoom lens for its full-frame mirrorless system. Canon showed a mockup of the RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 back in February when it debuted the EOS RP.

The 24-240mm includes Dynamic Image Stabilization rated to five stops. When not in use for manual focusing, a customizable control ring can be used to adjust exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture or ISO.

The lens weighs 26.4oz / 750g. At wide angle it offers a minimum focus distance of 0.50m / 1.64ft and 0.78m / 2.56ft at telephoto. Unfortunately for outdoorsy photographers, it lacks weather-sealing.

The RF 24-240mm F4.-6.3 IS USM will be available in September for $900; an RP kit with the 24-240mm will also be available for $2200.

Press release:

ALERTING ALL WANDERLUST PHOTOGRAPHERS, CANON ANNOUNCES ITS FIRST RF TELEPHOTO ZOOM LENS, THE RF 24-240MM F4-6.3 IS USM

The All-in-One RF Travel Lens Provides High-End Features Such as Nano USM at an Entry-Level Price Tag

MELVILLE, N.Y., July 8, 2019 –Introducing the next travel companion for photographers, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the sixth lens in the RF family, the RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM telephoto zoom lens. As the first telephoto zoom lens designed for EOS R and EOS RP full-frame mirrorless cameras, the compact and lightweight 10x zoom RF 24-240mm provides photographers high-quality images and video capture at a budget-friendly price point.

“Providing photographers of all skill levels with the invaluable tools to help capture and create the images they desire has been and will continue to be a paramount goal for Canon,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “The new RF 24-240mm is an excellent option as an all-around travel lens that provides attractive features for a wide variety of image capture.”

The RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM lens is equipped with Nano USM, providing users quick, high-speed and precision auto focus (AF) when shooting video and capturing still images. With the powerful Nano USM, this lens allows photographers and videographers full time manual focusing making possible the fine tuning and adjusting of focus while in AF mode. This is the first Canon lens designed for full-frame cameras to feature Dynamic IS and utilizes a CIPA-standard, five-stop image stabilization system. The five-stop IS allows photographers to capture images and record videos with minimal shake, even during nighttime sightseeing or in dimly lit indoor events, without the need of a tripod.

When paired with the recently announced EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera, the compact and lightweight portability of the RF 24-240mm rivals that of a Canon APS-C camera system with a comparable EF-S lens. The RF 24-240mm and EOS RP kitted together are only slightly heavier and longer than the EOS Rebel T7i when it is kitted with the EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS. The diminished form factor of the new lens and EOS RP together, as compared to other full-frame mirrorless camera systems using a similar focal-length telephoto zoom lens, make the lens and camera the ideal kit for travelers who are constantly on the go.

Additional features of the Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM include:

  • Minimum focusing distance of 1.64 feet/0.50 meters at wide angle and 2.56 feet/0.78 meters at telephoto
  • Maximum magnification of 0.26x at telephoto
  • Approximate weight of 750 grams/26.4 ounces
  • Customizable control ring that allows photographers to adjust exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture or ISO
  • Customizable control ring that allows photographers to adjust exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture or ISO
  • 21 lens elements in 15 groups including one Aspheric and Two UD Lens
  • 12-pin communication system

Pricing and Availability

The Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3mm IS USM lens is scheduled to be available September 2019 for an estimated retail price of $899.99*. In addition, Canon will offer a new EOS RP kit that includes the RF-24-240mm for an estimated retail price of $2199.00*. For additional information, please visit, usa.canon.com.

*Specifications, availability and prices are subject to change without notice. Actual prices are set by individual dealers and may vary.

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 24–240 mm
Image stabilization Yes
CIPA Image stabilization rating 5 stop(s)
Lens mount Canon RF
Aperture
Maximum aperture F4
Minimum aperture F6.3
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 7
Optics
Elements 21
Groups 15
Special elements / coatings 1 aspherical + 2 UD elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.50 m (19.69)
Maximum magnification 0.26×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Nano ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter No
Physical
Weight 750 g (1.65 lb)
Diameter 123 mm (4.84)
Length 80 mm (3.15)
Sealing No
Colour Black
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Power zoom No
Zoom lock Yes
Filter thread 72 mm
Hood supplied Yes

Watch This Pro Stuntman Break Down the Best (and Worst) Stunts in Hollywood

Not all stunts are created equal.

Stunts: they’ve been a staple of cinema since the beginning to the present day, from Buster Keaton narrowly avoiding being crushed by a falling house to Tom Cruise being the absolute most in Mission Impossible. Stunts ramp up the excitement up on the big screen (or small screen…whatever you’re watching on), but if you’re wanting to implement a few of them into your indie project, it might be a good idea to learn a few tricks of the trade.

Corridor Crew sat down with professional stuntman Eric Linden to break down some of Hollywood’s best stunts, as well as the ones that miss the mark. Check out the video below:

Read More

The Difference Between ‘Story By,’ ‘Screenplay By,’ and ‘Written By’

What is the difference between “Story by,” “Screenplay by,” and “Written by?” When you’re working in the studio system, you’re going to see a lot of different screenwriting credits. We explain what each means and their differences.

Writing credit matters.

It can help get you into the WGA, it affects residuals, and the more produced credits you get, the better it looks on your resume. But there is a slight complication with writing credits.

There are a few different kinds and they mean different things!

How do you know which credit you should get?

Today we’re going to get you all the answers.

As always, let’s start with a question…

What is the difference between “Story by,” “Screenplay by,” and “Written by?”

To answer this question, we consulted the WGA handbook on the matter. Let’s go through possible credits one by one and detail them. Side note: Over here you can learn about adaptations

Story By

A common misconception of “Story by” is that it refers to the person who came up with the idea. Not quite…

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What Computer Should Editors Buy Next (According to a Pro Computer Builder)?

Hear from a Senior Technician at one of the top custom computer builders in America about what to look for in a post-production powerhouse.

Since Apple announced the upcoming release of the new Mac Pro, the post-production community has been in a flurry of excitement and hesitancy, wondering what to make of it.

The new Mac Pro is a beautifully designed attempt to remind creative professionals that we are still in the back of Apple’s mind. The computer boasts impressive internal specs and claims to be an incredibly powerful workhorse, but starting at nearly $6,000, is it really worth the price point?

What do we really need, and what are the other options out there that can give us what we need? We sat down with Matt Bach from Puget Systems, a top-tier Seattle-based computer company that specializes in high-performance custom built machines, to ask about his take on the new Mac Pro, what hardware really matters for editors and colorists, and the future-proofing of our systems.

Read More

The Stanislavski Method of Acting

The Stanislavski Method of Acting

The Stanislavski Method is an approach to acting that was created by Constantin Stanislavski in 19th Century Russia. It may sound ancient and irrelevant today, but Stanislavski’s method is the basis of most modern acting techniques in the United States, from Stella Adler to Sanford Meisner and Lee Strasberg. Though it was born in the theater, where performances tend to be bigger and more exaggerated, the Stanislavski Method, also known as the Stanislavski System, was the beginning of real and natural performances, rooted in emotional truth. When you hear that an Actor is a “Method Actor,” the core of what this Actor does to prepare for a role comes from Stanislavski’s teaching.

So what is a method of acting? Well, if you’re an Actor, whether it’s for film or for stage, once you get a script, you have to figure out how to take the character off the written page and bring it to life. This is the Actor’s job. Learning the lines is just a tiny piece of what an Actor does to make a performance believable and keep the audience interested and engaged.

One thing to bear in mind when you study Stanislavski, if you pick up one of his books – and I suggest you do, it’s terrific reading – pay attention to when the book was written. There is an evolution of his teachings, as there is in many studies, but with Stanislavski, there is one particular part of his method called Emotional Memory that was essentially abandoned in his later teachings, even though some of his successors continued to teach it. I’ll speak more about it below.

First, we’ll explore these several elements that are the backbone of the Stanislavski method:

  1. Analyzing the text
  2. Units and objectives
  3. The Magic If
  4. Motivation
  5. Subtext
  6. Observation
  7. The body as an instrument
  8. Emotional memory

Analyzing the Text

It all begins with the script. This is where an Actor finds information about who a character is. Though an Actor uses his imagination to give shape to the character on the page, he must do this by using the written information, so Stanislavski required that an Actor look at the given circumstances to inform his choices. For example, one must determine where and when the story takes place, and decide how that affects character.

Before the Actor does any physical work he must break down the action and ask the questions “what, why and how.” Is the character married, working, or unemployed? Rich or poor? The Actor’s job is to look for clues in the script about how a character may behave. Someone who is hungry will react differently to a meal than someone who has already stuffed his face.

What Stanislavski understood was that an Actor has to create the illusion of truth, so an Actor must believe in his or her imagination. This can be done by going through the script and analyzing each moment to ask “what if,” to create a reality around the character and his or her circumstances.

Units and Objectives

The next step is to understand what the character wants. Characters do things in order to reach some sort of goal. Stanislavski liked to break the script down into units and objectives, which lead to what he called the super objective. The super objective is the overall objective of the character. The super objective of a character may be to get a job, but each scene provides particular obstacles and smaller goals, which are called units and objectives, (sometimes called beats). When they are strung together, they get the character closer to his or her overall goal or super objective, the character’s driving force.

To use the example of a character that needs a job, perhaps there is a scene in which the character is at an employment agency and he doesn’t have a pen… Filling out the application, then, is going to be an obstacle, and the character will do certain things (that may or may not be in the script) to solve the problem. Each time there is a shift in a scene, there might be a new objective – in this case, getting a hold of a pen to fill out that application. The next might be turning the application in.

The Magic If

The words “magic if ” are probably the most inspiring two words in the creative sphere. This is how the Actor fills in the blanks. Once the Actor has the circumstances – the character is unemployed and needs a job, he lives in a city, and he’s late with the rent payments – he must breathe life into the character with what is not on the page.

Stanislavski knew that whatever happened in a play (or in a motion picture nowadays), was not the truth. But the goal of the Actor is for the audience to believe it is true. This is why we laugh, cry, and identify with characters. What Stanislavski understood was that an Actor has to create the illusion of truth, so an Actor must believe in his or her imagination. This can be done by going through the script and analyzing each moment to ask “what if,” to create a reality around the character and his or her circumstances. Some Actors interpret this as “what would I do in this situation?” But that’s not the best question to ask. Rather, it should be, “What would the character do?” Each circumstance changes the way a character behaves, and an Actor has to take this into consideration and make choices. This can be by creating the backstory of a character (perhaps we don’t know how he or she became unemployed), or how the character physically moves. This is the way to explore behavior. When the character is angry, will he throw a soda can across the room in a rage or crush it in his hand? This is the fun of the magic if.

Motivation

When Actors are parodied, they are often depicted, (usually tortured) asking the Director, “What’s my motivation?” Honestly, it’s a good question. That’s why a murder investigation must uncover motive before anyone can prosecute. But what does that look like for an Actor? Well, let’s go back to our unemployed friend. We know his super objective is to get a job; we know his rent bills are piling up, but why does he need a job? What is important to him? Is it to win the love of his life or is it to get the inheritance that is due to him under the condition that he is employed? Each choice can make the character act in different ways. An Actor will often ask a Director what his or her motivation is because if the choice he or she made isn’t working, a different motivation will give him or her clues to adjust the performance.

Stanislavski believed that Actors should be keen observers. Through observation, Actors can understand experiences that they, themselves, may not have gone through. That’s why an Actor might do a ride along with a Police Officer or visit a prison.

Subtext

The subtext is the meaning beneath the line – the unspoken communication. The line may be, “It’s so good to see you!” But if this line is to the boss that fired our character, I bet there is some subtext. A good exercise is to put words to the subtext, but subtext comes to life in the tone of the voice or body language. Is our character angry with the guy who fired him? Or is he secretly begging to be rehired? Each choice will precipitate different actions or tone, so finding the subtext of dialog helps an Actor make choices that will reflect in the way he moves and speaks.

Observation

Stanislavski believed that Actors should be keen observers. Through observation, Actors can understand experiences that they, themselves, may not have gone through. That’s why an Actor might do a ride along with a Police Officer or visit a prison. He or she can get a feel for this experience by observing people going through it. They can pick up on body language and attitudes that they can use in their performance.

The Body as an Instrument

All of these things lead to the physical performance of an Actor. Actors must make choices about how a character speaks and moves physically. There are the overall physical embodiments of character – for example, a pregnant mother will walk a particular way. But what she does when she feels threatened is another thing…. Does she hold her hand on her belly? Someone may have a strong and confident voice, but how does he speak when he is in a library, or talking about an uncomfortable subject? All these things are physical manifestations of the choices an Actor makes.

Adaptation

An Actor does not work alone. It is often said that acting is reacting because an Actor must be in communion with his fellow Actors. If we were to go back to the idea of units and objectives, an Actor must adapt to each situation – like finding a pen to fill out his job application. But the Actor must also adapt to the choices other Actors make. If the Receptionist gives our character the stink eye when he asks for a pen, how does our character react? This is where rehearsals can get fun because you can play with the magic if.

A Word About Emotional Memory

Emotional memory is a controversial subject among Method Actors. The idea of the practice is for the Actor to explore his personal experiences to find a similar emotion to the one the character is experiencing and tap into that “emotional memory” — that is, the feelings associated with that memory, and use it during the performance. Though some Method Actors embrace this idea, Stanislavski observed that it could have a negative psychological effect on Actors and they could lose control during a performance, which is counterproductive.

Though Stanislavski authored his books many moons ago, he is the father of natural performances and is still very accessible today. If you are looking for tools to build a strong and believable character, Stanislavski provides a strong foundation.

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Is Sony About to Announce an APS-C Version of the a9?

Is Sony About to Announce an APS-C Version of the a9?

Sony is gearing up for a couple of announcements this week and the rumor sites seem fairly confident that the standout piece of news will be a sports-oriented, APS-C version of the Sony a9.

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Ricoh updates Pentax 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 fisheye with new coatings and exterior

Ricoh has updated the 2006-vintage Pentax 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 fisheye lens with new coatings and a more modern exterior.

The lens, now known as the HD-Pentax DA fisheye 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 ED, is equivalent to 15-25.5mm when mounted on APS-C bodies for which it’s designed. It has the same optics and screw-drive AF system as the original model, with the main change being the addition of HD and SP (Super Protective) coatings. The appearance of the lens has been updated to fit newer Pentax bodies.

The 10-17mm has 10 elements (including ED glass), a six-blade aperture, minimum focus distance of 14cm (5.5″) and a 180° angle-of-view at its wide end. This compact lens is just 80mm (2.8″) long and it weighs in at 317g (11.2oz).

You’ll be able to pick up the HD-Pentax DA fisheye 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 ED later this month for $499.

Press Release

Ricoh announces redesigned fish-eye zoom lens for K-mount digital SLR cameras

New HD PENTAX-DA FISH-EYE 10-17mm F3.5-4.5ED features the latest HD coating for enhanced image quality and completely redesigned body

WEST CALDWELL, NJ, July 9, 2019 Ricoh Imaging Americas Corporation today announced the launch of the HD PENTAX-DA FISH-EYE 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 ED zoom lens for use with K-mount digital SLR cameras. The compact and lightweight fish-eye lens features the latest HD coating and a completely redesigned body.

The lens provides a 180-degree diagonal angle view in the APS-C format at a focal length of 10mm to deliver eye-catching fish-eye to ultra-wide-angle images. It has a minimum focusing distance of 14 centimeters, allowing photographers to be as close as approximately 2.5 centimeters from the front end of the lens to the subject for ultra-close-up photography. It also features a Quick-Shift Focus System which provides an instant shift to manual-focus operation after locking a subject in focus during autofocus operation.

This lens is an upgrade based on the currently available smc PENTAX-DA FISH-EYE 10-17mm F3.5-4.5ED (IF). A high-grade, multi-layer HD Coating has been applied to the optical elements of the lens, enabling the capture of high-contrast images with edge-to-edge sharpness and minimizing flare and ghost images. A SP (Super Protective) Coating, highly repellent to water, grease and dirt, has also been applied to the lens’ front surface, making it easy to wipe off any stains or fingerprints.

The exterior of the lens has been redesigned to match the design of the latest PENTAX K-mount digital SLR models, and also to make its lens hood removable. When mounted on a PENTAX K-1 or PENTAX K-1 Mark II camera body, the photographer can remove the lens hood to produce nearly circular fish-eye images, expanding the range for photographic expressions.

| Pricing and Availability |

The HD PENTAX-DA FISH-EYE 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 ED lens will be available for sale at the end of July, at www.us.ricoh-imaging.com and retail outlets nationwide for a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $499.95.

HD Pentax-DA fisheye 10-17mm F3.5-4.5 ED specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size APS-C / DX
Focal length 10–17 mm
Lens mount Pentax KAF
Aperture
Maximum aperture F3.5–4.5
Minimum aperture F22–32
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 6
Optics
Elements 10
Groups 8
Special elements / coatings ED element, HD + Super Protective coatings
Focus
Minimum focus 0.14 m (5.51)
Maximum magnification 0.39×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Screw drive from camera
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale Yes
DoF scale No
Physical
Weight 317 g (0.70 lb)
Diameter 68 mm (2.68)
Length 70 mm (2.76)
Sealing No
Colour Black
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Hood supplied Yes
Tripod collar No

Kinefinity MAVO LF Review – Should This 6K Camera Attract More Attention?

A comprehensive review of the Kinefinity MAVO LF 6K (3:2) camera. “Large Format” is still the big thing as more cameras participate in the knockout process against the ARRI ALEXA LF and Mini LF. We have taken a close look at handling, ergonomics, functionality, tech specs and real-world practice experiences with it. How did the camera perform?

Kinefinity MAVO LF operated by DoP Mark Zdunnek

The Kinefinity MAVO and MAVO LF cinema cameras are built on the same image processing platform, use an advanced color processing architecture with the latest ColorScience and state-of-the-art CMOS image sensors. The MAVO is equipped with an S35 sensor, while the MAVO LF as a large format version is equipped with a 6K (3:2) sensor. Both cameras achieve very low noise and high dynamic range. My production company Altruist Films and I had the opportunity to shoot some productions with the Kinefinity MAVO LF and test it extensively.

Production & Testing Environment

We were able to test and evaluate the Kinefinity MAVO LF within multiple real-world environment shoots, ranging from music performances to image and product-related productions, over several weeks. We’ve been able to thereby test the camera in comparison or relationship to multiple cameras from Sony, Canon, Blackmagic Design and even action cameras.

Essential Features & Large Format Sensor

It was clear from the very first second I held the camera: with just less than 1kg (body only) it’s a real lightweight among the high-resolution cinema cameras, maybe similar to the Z Cam E2 (our review is coming soon) and future Z Cam models.

The 6K and even the 4K image of the MAVO LF look very sharp – without being digitally resharpened – and deliver an organic-looking, pleasing image. Since there is always an extensive discussion of relative sharpness amongst cinematographers and some argue for more realistic or softer organic sharpness, while others rely on and favor more precise or even ultra-sharp images, everyone should, of course, make up his mind about this. I particularly liked that the 4K image looked sharper in a more subtle appealing way than other cameras.

The MAVO LF with large-format sensor produces cleaner images, covers an extensive section of a 46mm image circle and, thanks to the large sensor, of course, offers less depth of field, which creates many aesthetic design possibilities with appropriate lenses. It should also be noted that the large-format sensor with its exact dimensions of 36mm x 24mm is now ~2.25x as large as a standard S35 sensor and the dimensions of the ARRI Alexa LF sensor of 36.7mm x 25.54mm are very close.

Resolutions, Dynamic Range and Aspect Ratios

According to the manufacturer, the dynamic range reaches more than 14 f-stops, which exceeds the performance of the Sony PXW-FS7 and was similar to the range of the Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro 4.6K in my experience. (We haven’t put the MAVO LF through our rigorous cinema5D dynamic range and rolling shutter tests yet but will do that at a later stage.)

In addition to the usual standard aspect ratios of 16:9 and 17:9 (DCI), a variety of other image formats, such as 6:5 S35 (for anamorphic recording), 4:3, and up to 24 MP at full sensor use in 3:2 image ratio can also be selected in the menu.

One of the essential features is that the MAVO LF 6K (6016 x 4016px, native resolution with sensor format 3:2) can record HFR in 6K (Wide) at up to 75fps (from 6fps in 1-frame steps freely adjustable) and 4K slow motion up to 100fps (Wide, 4096 x 1720px) and up to 75fps (4K DCI, 4096 x 2160px) respectively.

SideGrip, ergonomics, and connectivity on the backside of the Kinefinity MAVO LF

Modularity, Handling, and Ergonomics

The camera system of the Kinefinity MAVO LF is designed as a modular lightweight cinema camera system. The cube shape and angular construction are most reminiscent of RED cameras or the Z Cam E2 and are designed for a few control knobs only as well as a SideGrip with an essential steering wheel.

A considerable advantage of the modular design is that the MAVO LF can even be used on light-built gimbals. In our case, it was used on a Zhiyun Crane 2 for many shots – without straining the engine too much.

I have reduced the camera substantially for this purpose by detaching modules such as the handle, and attached the monitor via a video cable with a Magic Arm to an additional rod of the gimbal and was thus able to balance the camera well and move it quite freely.

Split screen: MAVO LF on Zhiyun Crane 2 (left) and with 85mm T1.5 Walimex lens on a tripod (right)

Controls, Symbols & Logic

Anyone who has relied on established camera systems from major manufacturers for years or decades has become accustomed to the intensity, sensitivity, position, button types and inherent or learned logic of the symbols and controls.

Those mentioned above are well-established manufacturers such as Panasonic, Canon, ARRI or Sony, which have extensive experience and knowledge in building long-lasting camera platforms, thanks to an army of engineers. They have built an enormous customer base with advanced academies or training platforms. On top of that, they have accumulated many loyal followers for their products and some are so attached to those brands that one could argue they even worship these manufacturers or their products. (The worshipping part is also true for “newer” disruptive brands like RED …)

Of course, symbols, arrangement, and controls must first be learnt anew with the TERRA, MAVO or MAVO LF, but newbies to the Kinefinity system can also operate it after a very short time without any restrictions, and the desired selections can be made accurately and quickly.

Kinefinity MAVO LF buttons and display (left side of the camera)

Synchronization Options & Power Supply

The MAVO LF offers Tally, AutoSlate, Beeper, Trigger and with KineBACK-W SMPTE LTC and 3D/Multi-cam Sync as options for synchronization in a multi-camera setup. With the SideGrip as an additional handle with battery slot “GripBAT” 45Wh (BP-U30 compatible) for power supply, the camera can reach a real operating time (standby and recording) of more than 1 hour.

RAW, Compression and Codec Selection

With the Kinefinity MAVO LF, you can use different codecs for recording and further processing in color grading suites like Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve. Especially the proprietary KineRAW 2.0 (.krw) (with a compression ratio of approx. 2:1 to 10:1) and CinemaDNG (.cdg) (compression ratio 3:1, 5:1 or 7:1) with 12 bit color depth should be mentioned. These formats – and especially the widely used CinemaDNG – initially offer maximum freedom in design and simplify the workflow through standardized processes, as they are also used for the further processing of material from leading cinema camera manufacturers.

For my real-world recordings (apart from experiments and tests), I used Apple ProRes HQ4444 (12 Bit). As expected, the created files could be easily processed within the Adobe Creative Cloud. ProRes422HQ/422/LT/Proxy, ProRes4444 and ProRes4444XQ are available for selection in the camera.

Kinefinity MAVO LF backside, connectivity and control buttons

Dual ISO & ISO Values

Essential differences to the predecessor model MAVO above all result from the new full-frame sensor. These also include that there now is a Dual-Base ISO: 800 ISO (under 2000 ISO as the base) and 5120 ISO (from 2000 ISO as the base). At the same time, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) has been improved. In my tests, ISO values of 800, 1600, 2560 and 3200 were pleasant to use. 5120 ISO should still be acceptable for some applications.

Higher ISO values can also be used well if the target is a down-converted result (e.g. HD, 2K, 4K). Since the pixel spacing has increased due to the larger sensor (50% larger than with the MAVO) and thus disadvantages of too small and too close pixels have been improved compared to the predecessor, the MAVO LF has become more light-sensitive in relation to its predecessor.

MAVO LF handheld with Movcam top handle accessory

Media / Storage Solution

Even without accessories and modular add-ons, recording on SSDs of all common brands can be started immediately. In the test, I used a Samsung SSD that was included but not certified by Kinefinity, as well as SSDs from other leading manufacturers such as SanDisk, Crucial and Transcend without making any compromises. Notable is that only SSDs up to 7mm height can be used. Relay and simultaneous recording are not possible inside the camera housing, because only one SSD slot is installed.

If, however, the KineBACK-W is used as an optional add-on module, the signal can also be displayed externally on monitors via 2x 3G-SDI connectors and recorded with recorders in lower resolution (and limited frame rate). Therefore both backup and 2nd recording options in full quality are currently not possible.

SSD stack with 1TB cards from SanDisk

First Impressions from Post-Production

Our first impression from the post-production is that the camera delivers pleasant skin tones, can be easily graded with the image material of different other cameras, and shadow details and highlights are well preserved in the shot with low noise and can, therefore, be edited suitably.

Community: Questions on Errors and Crashes

I have been asked via social media several times how many crashes and technical errors I experienced when using and recording with the camera. Although I recorded many hours of footage and used the camera on several days over long standby times – sometimes in a very dusty and temporarily heated environment, sometimes changing a lot in the menu and trying it out freely – I only had one non-reproducible problem.

After switching on the camera again, it was suddenly not possible to record onto a SanDisk SSD with a displayed error message. We exchanged the SSD, and the problem was solved immediately. All data was entirely stored on the previously used SSD, no data loss occurred, and the error never happened again.

For more security, the manufacturer recommends using certified KineMAG+ SSDs. The SSD workflow turned out to be speedy overall and very pleasant when offloaded or directly installed in a server and, above all, very inexpensive thanks to non-proprietary SSDs. I didn’t have any drop frames or other technical errors or missing files.

KineMOUNT and Adaptors

With a pretty short flange focal distance (FFD) or flange back distance (FBD) of just 15mm, it can be seen that the manufacturer wants to enable versatile adaptability to other common lens mounts. The proprietary KineMOUNT, which is at the same time the original lens mount of the Kinefinity TERRA, is used as the interchangeable mount. Thus, an essential and worthy discussion point about this camera is the lens mount.

This mount is shorter than many standard mounts (e.g. Sony E-Mount – 18mm, Sony FZ-Mount – 19mm, Canon EF-Mount – 44mm, Nikon F-Mount – 46,5mm, ARRI PL-Mount – 52mm). Thus in the newly designed form, it allows that new PL mounting adapters with /i Technology and Nikon F adapter, new wireless EF adapters, EF adapter with KineEnhancer, EF/PL adapter with electronic ND (e-ND), new SONY FE/E adapters, and more are supported. In my tests I mainly used EF lenses from various manufacturers without any problems.

KineMON black and white display on the Kinefinity MAVO LF

Camera Operation: Wishes, Demands, and Expectations

In my experiments and tests, I  was especially impressed with the useful focusing aid, a reasonable exposure function, additional control options via the SideGrip (optional) and a solid black-and-white display for accurate sharpness adjustment including color peaking.

As a filmmaker, of course, you have many demands on technology nowadays, and many would undoubtedly wish for future Kinefinity cameras to have more functions, which are currently only accessible in the menu, moved to the outside of the camera via additional buttons.

Another wish would be that the sensitivity of the click wheels, the control symbols, and logic could be adapted even more to known standards. Here the high sensitivity of the SideGrip wheel has been explicitly noticed, which could perhaps become even more sophisticated with newer firmware versions in the future or through constant further development of the pushbuttons, switches, and wheels.

Sensitivities like these, which we have already experienced with other manufacturers and sometimes even over several version numbers, remained similar until a change was made much later. It would also be desirable to have (at least) a touchscreen control of critical camera functions using the monitor, which would increase the operating options and facilitate the speed of selection.

Split screen: KineMON-5L HD (left) and MAVO LF on Zhiyun Crane 2 gimbal (right)

Verdict

The camera is suitable as a portable, lightweight cinematographer’s tool of choice and can be used in reduced camera setups with gimbals and bigger drones. Thanks to its high image resolution and sharpness, it can also be explicitly used for Visual Effects Shots, where the high resolution and the free selection of available aspect ratios can be of particular benefit. Therefore, the subjectively high-rated overall image quality can and should be emphasized again.

A central aspect of the conclusion for me is to show here for which areas of application I consider the camera to be particularly suitable. These are independent productions, working in small teams or professional productions in which, on the one hand, sufficient time is available for the setup and, on the other hand, the highest degree of reliability is not necessarily required. It’s also suitable when conventional and fully established workflows are not priority factors. If you have to have more standardized workflows, KineRAW shouldn’t be used, and you can switch to ProRes, which of course simplifies the workflows a lot.

Where 6K acquisition is used for 4K delivery and a budget for a suitable Sony VENICE or RED is not available, it would be an option to include the Kinefinity MAVO LF in the final selection round. The service from and contact to the European representation in Berlin should was extremely helpful and positive, but we of course always recommend to take a close look at the camera before a possible shoot.

We recommend to shoot tests and get a better idea of the screen and controls to enjoy the best possible outcome from the first production. I didn’t have to exclude any filmed footage from post-production because of lack of experience, and with a little practice, I was able to create high-quality images with the MAVO LF.

Links: MAVO LF – Kinefinity

The post Kinefinity MAVO LF Review – Should This 6K Camera Attract More Attention? appeared first on cinema5D.

DJI Releases Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle

DJI has just released their own take on a dual handle grip for their (very) popular Ronin-S gimbal. Maybe this is the solution for tired arms and sweating operators. Let’s check it out!

Ronin-S

Gimbals are a nice addition to any filmmakers toolbox but once it comes to actually operate one, you’ll see the downsides.. Pick up and shoot? Nope, quite a bit of setup and preparation time needs to be taken into account. A gimbal gives you the exact same smooth floating sequences a traditional Steadicam system gives you? Again, sorry but no. Most gimbals lack the 4th axis for smoothing out the vertical movement of your body while walking or running.

Ronin-S

Still, a gimbal, even more so a single-handed one, offers lots of new possibilities for indie filmmakers while maintaining a relatively small footprint in your bag. One issue remains, though: weight. Operating such a single-handed device will take a toll on your muscles over time. In order to fight that muscle fatigue, DJI has released the so-called Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle. With it, you can operate the Ronin-S with both hands.

Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle

On first look, this new accessory doesn’t offer anything over any of the other aftermarket solutions out there for transforming a single-handed gimbal into a dual-handed one. But the DJI solution has some tricks up its sleeve. It comes in five parts: The clamp-on ring for attaching it to the Ronin-S, two Nato rails and two handles.

Ronin-S

After attaching the ring to the gimbal, you’ll notice three access points where you can attach the NATO rails to the ring. That way you can either attach the rails on both sides of the gimbal for a classic dual-handle setup, or you can attach just one rail to the access point facing towards you and attach one of the grips to it for a vertical single-handed setup.

Ronin-S

This looks pretty familiar if you look at other gimbals such as the Zhiyun Crane 3 Lab. The handles attach, again, using the NATO standard, to the rail and can slide to whatever position which suits you best.

Pricing and Availability

The DJI Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle sell for $129 and they are available now. If this offers any advantages over other third-party products lies in the eye of the beholder. What I like is the fact that the DJI solution mounts to the top of the Ronin-S rather than to the battery grip, resulting in a more balanced setup. Furthermore, both arms offer quite a few 1/4″ and 3/8″ mounting holes plus a cold shoe on the end of the rail.

Ronin-S

Nevertheless, I’m somewhat disappointed that DJI came up with such a trivial solution for their own gimbal. Maybe they offer a more advanced dual-handle setup in the future with a build-in joystick for one of the outboard handles and a focus wheel as an option. Furthermore, a solution for ditching the gimbals battery grip altogether for a more compact dual-handle setup would be nice to see. For now, we have to work with what we have and this Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle, although being rather simple, is a nice addition to the already very capable Ronin-S.

In case you missed it, here’s our very extensive video review and tutorial on the Ronin-S:

links: DJI

What do you think? Do you use single-handed gimbals or do you prefer a proper rig such as the MōVI Pro? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post DJI Releases Ronin-S Switch Grip Dual Handle appeared first on cinema5D.

A Helpful Tutorial on Finding Compositions in Landscape Photography

A Helpful Tutorial on Finding Compositions in Landscape Photography

There are many difficult aspects of landscape photography, but perhaps one of the trickiest to master is the art of composition. This helpful video tutorial will show you some great tips for finding and refining compositions in landscape photography.

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