Star Wars

7 Reasons Why “Miller’s Crossing” is a Neglected Masterpiece

By Woodson Hughes

There is a good argument to be made for the filmmaking team of brothers Ethan and Joel Coen (one a director, the other a producer, both screenwriters) to be as mainstream as cult filmmakers can possibly get. Yes, they have Oscars (and many other awards) and have had box office success (OK, not up there with “Star Wars” or the biggest works of Steven Spielberg, but pretty good for “quality” filmmakers), but almost every film they have made has some kind of cult following.

These cults aren’t always cut along the lines of box office or award success. Yes, “Fargo” (1996) was a big hit and cult item but so was 1998’s “The Big Lebowski”, now virtually one for the pantheon, which is not at all how the film was first seen by reviewers or the public.

Even films such as “The Hudsucker Proxy” (1994) and 2016’s “Hail, Caesar!”, once thought of as misfires, now have passionate defenders (and if one doubts this, cross one of those acolytes). However, there are some exceptions, such as 2003’s “Intolerable Cruelty”, 2008’s “Burn After Reading”, certainly 2004’s remake of “The Ladykillers”… and, very oddly, 1990’s “Miller’s Crossing”.

“Miller’s Crossing” is a period gangland drama (with black comedy touches). It is true that the Coen’s comedies, even the purer black ones, tend to have more of a following than the dramas but the blind eye many turn to this film (admittedly, an early drama for the brothers after notable comedies and their debut, the neo-noir Blood Simple in 1984) is puzzling. However, being a drama doesn’t seem an impediment for such films as the Oscar winning No Country for Old Men (2007) or Inside Llewyn Davis (2013), a film also with an initially cold reception.

The thrust of this article is meant to point out this film’s → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Ladies and gentlemen, we are photo-real objects floating in space

By noreply@redsharknews.com (RedShark News Staff)

Could we be watching holographic television in two years?

If you think Star Trek’s Holodeck and Star Wars’ holographic Princess Leia are still pie in the sky, think again. A US startup is targeting the launch of a holographic TV in just two years.

  • holographic display
  • Holographic TV
  • Light field
  • depth mapping

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    From:: RedShark News

    All Things Apple & Panasonic’s Surprisingly Affordable New Camera [PODCAST]

    By Liz Nord

    This episode of Indie Film Weekly brings a fall gear preview with news from IBC, Apple, Panasonic, Resolve, and more.

    Jon Fusco, Charles Haine, and yours truly, Liz Nord discuss all the latest gear news coming out of Amsterdam’s IBC expo, including more details of Panasonic’s EVA-1 and major Resolve upgrades, plus the multiple Apple announcements made at the company’s annual launch event and how they affect indie filmmakers. We also cover a bevy of indie acquisition news out of TIFF, Louis CK’s top-secret DIY movie, the Creative Arts Emmys, and Disney’s latest Star Wars shakeup.

    As always, the show also brings Ask No Film School, plus news you can use about upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.

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    From:: No Film School

    10 Movies That Tried and Failed To Be The Next “Harry Potter”

    By Cara McWilliam-Richardson

    The Harry Potter Film Franchise spawned eight films, and made over seven billion dollars at the worldwide box office. It is one of the highest grossing film series of all time and has made more money than other popular film franchises such as Star Wars and James Bond.

    Its success led to Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a spin off film series, which will comprise of five films. These films serve as an expansion of the Harry Potter Film Franchise, and are set to increase the value of the franchise even more.

    The massive success of the Harry Potter Film Franchise has had a significant impact on the film industry. Film studios realised that established material had the potential to be hugely profitable, and every studio wanted to emulate the films’ popularity.

    The films are also credited with being responsible for the rise in films based on young adult and children’s literature. Novels became the go to point for film studios, and a plethora of films in this vein followed. The success and reception of these films was mixed. As of yet, none have managed to reach the same colossal heights as the Harry Potter Film Franchise. But many have tried. Here is a look at some films that hoped to be the next ‘Harry Potter’ and failed.

    1. The Golden Compass (2007)

    the-golden-compass

    The Golden Compass is based on ‘Northern Lights,’ the first novel in Phillip Pullman’s ‘His Dark Materials’ trilogy. The novels have won a number of awards, and were adapted into a successful stage play in 2003. The novels have also been a source of controversy, with some of the themes addressed in them being seen as anti-religious.

    The film boasts a great cast, with actors such as Daniel Craig, Nicole Kidman and Sir Ian McKellan → continue…

    From:: Taste Of Cinema

    10 Movies That Tried and Failed To Be The Next “Harry Potter”

    By Cara McWilliam-Richardson

    The Harry Potter Film Franchise spawned eight films, and made over seven billion dollars at the worldwide box office. It is one of the highest grossing film series of all time and has made more money than other popular film franchises such as Star Wars and James Bond.

    Its success led to Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a spin off film series, which will comprise of five films. These films serve as an expansion of the Harry Potter Film Franchise, and are set to increase the value of the franchise even more.

    The massive success of the Harry Potter Film Franchise has had a significant impact on the film industry. Film studios realised that established material had the potential to be hugely profitable, and every studio wanted to emulate the films’ popularity.

    The films are also credited with being responsible for the rise in films based on young adult and children’s literature. Novels became the go to point for film studios, and a plethora of films in this vein followed. The success and reception of these films was mixed. As of yet, none have managed to reach the same colossal heights as the Harry Potter Film Franchise. But many have tried. Here is a look at some films that hoped to be the next ‘Harry Potter’ and failed.

    1. The Golden Compass (2007)

    the-golden-compass

    The Golden Compass is based on ‘Northern Lights,’ the first novel in Phillip Pullman’s ‘His Dark Materials’ trilogy. The novels have won a number of awards, and were adapted into a successful stage play in 2003. The novels have also been a source of controversy, with some of the themes addressed in them being seen as anti-religious.

    The film boasts a great cast, with actors such as Daniel Craig, Nicole Kidman and Sir Ian McKellan → continue…

    From:: Taste Of Cinema

    Make a Short About Tokyo, Win $10,000

    By Sponsored Content

    The Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia is celebrating its twentieth anniversary, and you’re invited to the party.

    It has now been twenty years since Japanese actor Tetsuya Bessho founded the Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia [SSFF & ASIA] festival in the Harajuku neighborhood of Tokyo back in 1999. That first event would always be a hard act to follow.

    At the inaugural edition, six short films directed by George Lucas back in his student days were screened. This caught the attention of the famed Star Wars creator, and he has supported SSFF & ASIA ever since. In a statement made in regard to the festival he once said, “Film Festivals do matter. They educate and entertain audiences with collections of works from around the world, but also they are the platforms that can change the lives of the directors behind the films forever.”

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    From:: No Film School

    Colin Trevorrow No Longer Directing ‘Star Wars: Episode IX’

    By Christopher Boone

    ‘Jurassic World’ director and Lucasfilm mutually part ways on the ninth installment of the saga.

    Late yesterday, there was another great disturbance in the Force when Lucasfilm officially announced that the company and Colin Trevorrow had decided to go their separate ways and Trevorrow would no longer be the director of Star Wars: Episode IX. Here’s the official statement from Lucasfilm:

    Lucasfilm and Colin Trevorrow have mutually chosen to part ways on Star Wars: Episode IX. Colin has been a wonderful collaborator throughout the development process but we have all come to the conclusion that our visions for the project differ. We wish Colin the best and will be sharing more information about the film soon.

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    From:: No Film School

    10 Sci-fi Movies That Should Be Cult Classics

    By Derich Heath

    What makes a cult sci-fi film? Usually, they’re movies that were misunderstood or overlooked upon their initial release. More often than not, they were financial failures. Some are hidden gems, genuinely brilliant pieces of work that were inexplicably ignored or mishandled; others succeed in another fashion, becoming quoted and cherished for reasons that are maybe different than the filmmakers intended (the “so-bad-it‘s-good“ film, if you will).

    It’s a big world and there are a lot of films out there, hundreds upon hundreds that are very easy to miss if you’re not willing to dig a little. Listed below are ten science fiction films that deserve more of a cult following:

    1. Starcrash (1979)

    In 1977, American producer Nat Wachsberger approached a young Italian filmmaker named Luigi Cozzi with the opportunity to write and direct a quick Star Wars cash-in.

    The film was shot in Rome on a budget of $4 million and managed to attract a surprisingly eclectic cast, including Christopher Plummer (paid the princely sum of $10,000 per day), Marjoe Gartner (an evangelist preacher turned actor), David Hasselhoff (he contracted food poisoning and had a masked stand-in perform much of his part), and British exploitation queen Caroline Munro (looking impossibly beautiful).

    The hackneyed plot of Starcrash is, in all honesty, hardly worth examining – it involves The Emperor of the Galaxy and his son who has been taken prisoner by the evil Count Zarth Arn (the late, great Joe Spinell). Blatant unoriginality aside, this is an unintentionally hilarious classic, chock full of laughable special effects, poorly dubbed dialogue, and terrible performances (the entire cast seems either confused or slightly embarrassed).

    Shot over a period of 18 long months, the labor behind its creation is always apparent and here we arrive at the true reason for its → continue…

    From:: Taste Of Cinema

    The 10 Best Simon Pegg Movies You Need To Watch

    By Allan Khumalo

    Everybody loves Simon Pegg. It’s not only the geeks who have a soft spot for the British actor, but anyone who’s ever seen any of his films. He’s humble, smart and a fine actor who’s provided some of the best laughs in over a decade. You’ll be hard pressed to find another well respected and likable actor (other than Tom Hanks, perhaps).

    Heck, the guy seems to be living the dream. He’s worked with his idols Steven Spielberg and George A. Romero. He’s starred in some of his favorite franchises, like ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Star Trek’. He’s chums with the likes of Quentin Tarantino and Peter Jackson, among others. He’s skydived from Tom Cruise’s private jet. And of course, he’s Edgar Wright’s BFF. Not too shabby. Maybe we’re taking it too far, but one can’t help but envy Mr. Pegg, just a little bit.

    More seen as a comedic actor, Pegg also has a natural ability to convey drama that makes his brand of comedy even more hilarious. His written and starred in some of the most fun movies in over a decade. He’s a pretty versatile actor who can slip into many different types of roles. He’s also a geek of note who loves to pay respect to anything that’s influenced or paved the way for him.

    10. Paul (2011)

    Paul (2011)

    Pegg and Nick Frost play Graeme Willy and Clive Gollings, two British science-fiction geeks. After visiting Comic-Con they take a road trip through the American Southwest to visit the sites of reported extraterrestrial activity. Ironically, they bump into a real alien voiced by Seth Rogen who’s on the run from the government.

    “Paul” never hits the heights of Pegg and Frost’s work with Edgar Wright. In fact, he is sorely missed in this love letter to all things → continue…

    From:: Taste Of Cinema