Ridley Scott

Watch: 5 Films That Director Ridley Scott Loves

By V Renée

Ridley Scott’s list of favorite films is as eclectic as they come.

When it comes to genre, director Ridley Scott’s work is quite diverse. He made a name for himself in the late-70s and early-80s with his brand of dark sci-fi cinema, including titles like Alien and Blade Runner, but eventually went on to cover cop thrillers, war films, “sword and sandal” flicks, and pretty much everything in between. And knowing that he has inspired the work of so many young filmmakers, it makes you wonder if the films that inspired him are just as diverse as his filmography. According to this video by Fandor, they are.

The list gives you a little bit of everything. You’ve got a film noir made during the height of the film movement, an iconic sci-fi film made by one of the greatest filmmakers who has ever lived, an Australian dramedy that introduced Toni Collette to the world, a post-apocalyptic sci-fi number, and, of course, Star Wars.

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From:: No Film School

Your Definitive Guide to Preparing for ‘Blade Runner 2049’

By Liz Nord

Want to brush up on your ‘Blade Runner’? We’ve got you covered.

We’ve been waiting for this moment for years. Sure, we put Blade Runner 2049 on our list of most anticipated films for 2017, but our love affair with this sci-fi classic and intrigue about its long overdue sequel goes back much further than that.

After all, Ridley Scott’s 1982 original Blade Runner damn near defined a genre, and the crew behind the new film are top notch. Director Denis Villeneuve was known for suspenseful dramas like Prisoners (2013) and Sicario (2015) until his first foray into sci-fi last year, Arrival, a film that quietly subverted genre conventions. DP Roger Deakins, though not necessarily a household name, is a hero to cinematographers worldwide, and has shot some of the most influential films of the last 30 years, including every Coen Brothers hit fas far back as Barton Fink (1991).

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From:: No Film School

5 Ways ‘Blade Runner’ Changed the Look of Sci-Fi Forever

By Chris O’Falt The visual influence of Ridley Scott’s 1982 masterpiece has only grown over the last 35 years. → continue…

From:: Indie WIRE Filmmaker Toolkit

Watch: A Novel Way to Make Your Characters More Human

By Max Winter

Stanley Kubrick and Ridley Scott are among the filmmakers who use this tactic.

One of the most basic questions faced by any filmmaker must be this: what is the universal human angle here? How do I bring out the human element in these characters and this story, making the film matter to its viewers? There are many paths to that answer, the most obvious being making the story as engaging as possible, using human interest as story elements where possible, or adding as many dimensions to characters as they can hold. However, some directors, ranging from Stanley Kubrick to Ridley Scott to Spike Jonze, have amplified the humanity of their characters by contrast, specifically by including nonhuman, non-animal characters in their films to remind us of what makes a human a human and what makes a robot a robot.

In the most outlandish films, we may notice the least outlandish details first.

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From:: No Film School

Watch: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Final Prequel Short Reveals the Origin of the Blackout

By Christopher Boone

The anime short ‘Black Out 2022’ by Shinichiro Watanabe gives us the most details yet between the original ‘Blade Runner’ and its sequel.

If the first two Blade Runner 2049 prequel shorts directed by Luke Scott, Ridley’s son, felt like appetizers, the final prequel short feels almost like a meal. Legendary anime director Shinichiro Watanabe (Cowboy Bebop, Samurai Champloo, and Kid’s Story and A Detective Story from The Animatrix) reveals much more about what happened between Ridley Scott’s original film and Denis Villeneuve’s highly anticipated (and much praised) sequel.

Check out Black Out 2022, an anime prequel that illustrates the fate of the replicants, the fall of the Tyrell Corporation and the rise of the Wallace Corp.

In case you missed it, here’s the second prequel short, 2048: Nowhere to Run, introducing Sapper Morton (Dave Bautista), a worm farmer with something to hide.

And here’s the first prequel short, 2036: Nexus Dawn, about the next generation of replicants created by Niander Wallace (Jared Leto).

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From:: No Film School

Watch: Discover How ‘Blade Runner’ Created a New Genre

By Justin Morrow

Take a deep dive into this indelible world of future noir that has influenced art and culture ever since.

To say that Blade Runner 2049 is eagerly anticipated would be to understate the case by orders of magnitude. The original Blade Runner, directed in 1982 by Ridley Scott and based on the Philip K. Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? single-handedly created a new aesthetic. It was science fiction set in a world uncomfortably close to our own, yet canted just enough to hide in shadow. And, as Michael Tucker notes in this new video from Lessons from the Screenplay, “Blade Runner was the first film to truly take the thematic elements of classic film noir and integrate them into the science fiction genre.” Here are three ways the film the did that, and in doing so, made film history.

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From:: No Film School