OIS

These are the best smartphone cameras you can buy now

Few would argue that in 2017 the mobile device industry is a major driver of imaging hardware innovation. Long gone are the days when the size of the image sensor and the aperture were the major determining factors for image quality. Instead, phone manufacturers have turned to software and computational imaging methods to achieve better detail, wider dynamic range and lower noise levels, as well as high-quality zooming and DSLR-like bokeh effects.

High-powered chipsets with built-in image signal processors and sensors with very fast read-out times make it possible to combine image data that is captured by dual-lenses, or several frames recorded in quick succession, within milliseconds. These methods produce image quality that would have been unthinkable on a smartphone only a few years ago and often surpasses basic compact cameras.

Thanks to those advances in software, but also new hardware concepts, such as dual-cameras, hybrid AF-systems and more powerful image signal processors, current smartphone cameras are better than ever before. Here is our selection of the best models available in 2017, noting where their particular strengths lie.


Best display: Apple iPhone X

Dual 12MP-camera | 28/52mm equiv. focal lengths | F1.8 and F2.4 apertures | OIS | 4K/60fps video | 5.8-inch display

Apple’s brand new flagship iPhone X pulls all the technological plugs and comes with features and specifications that we haven’t seen on any iPhones or even other smartphones before. The iPhone X offers a marginally faster F2.4 telephoto lens than its cousin iPhone 8 Plus and, compared to last year’s 7 Plus, adds optical image stabilization in the telephoto lens. On the video side of things the X is capable of recording 4K footage at 60 frames per second and slow-motion clips at → continue…

From:: DPreview

Cinematic 4K footage shot with the Apple iPhone X

Matteo Bertoli, a California-based cinematographer, got a chance to try out the iPhone X’s video capabilities in Kauai and has just published the results. And before you ask – Bertoli states that it was all shot handheld.

“I DID NOT use any lenses, accessories, tripods or sliders. Everything was shot handheld, the only thing I had on the phone was the silicon case, that’s it. Also I DID NOT use Filmic Pro. Everything was done with the native camera app. Shot in 4K at 24fps,” he states on YouTube.

Bertoli did grade the footage in Davinci Resolve 14. He also stays that, impressively, most of the video was shot using the telephoto camera. The secondary camera module’s inclusion of OIS and a brighter F2.4 aperture means it’s more useful for these kinds of applications.

Take a look at the footage above and let us know what you think in the comments.

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From:: DPreview

iFixis tears down the iPhone X

Image: Ifixit

The brand new Apple iPhone X got a complete teardown from iFixit.com, which rates the device a 6 out of 10 on its repairability scale, putting it on the same level as the iPhone 8 Plus and Google Pixel 2 XL. It’s easier to repair than a Samsung Galaxy Note 8 though which scored only 4 points.

The iFixit team were particularly impressed with the repairability of battery and display. The latter can be replaced without removing the biometric Face ID hardware for example. On the downside, the analysis found that unrelated components are tied together by cables, turning them into complex assemblies that are difficult and expensive to replace.
The teardown also gets us a good look at the iPhone X Dual 12 MP cameras (wide-angle and telephoto) with F1.8 and F2.4 apertures and OIS and the 7 MP TrueDepth front camera with F2.2 aperture, 1080p HD video recording, and Face ID. Head over the ifixit.com for the full report and lots of detail images.

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From:: DPreview

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

We’re at the Photo Plus Expo show in New York, where Fujifilm is showing off its new XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR and GF 45mm F2.8 R WR prime lenses.

First up is the snappily-named XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR. It’s equivalent to a 122mm prime on X-series bodies, and as you can see, it’s a big lens. It also fills an appropriately big gap in Fujifilm’s historical lens lineup, being the first of Fuji’s X-mount lenses to give full 1:1 macro reproduction.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

As usual for Fujifilm’s current lenses, the 80mm offers the option of manual aperture control via a dedicated dial, and a large focusing ring provides very fine control over focus, if required.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

The XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR is optically stabilized, and is rated to provide around 5 stops of correction. This should help greatly in the macro focusing range, as well as making the lens more usable in general, in lower lighting conditions.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

Toggle switches on the lens barrel allow the photographer to restrict the lens’s focusing range, as well as activate / deactivate the OIS stabilization system. The XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR is weather sealed (that’s what the ‘WR’ means) and like all of Fujifilm’s high-end lenses, it’s built to a very high standard of construction.

The Fujifilm XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR will be available next month for $1200.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

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