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15 Great Movies To Watch If You Liked “Stranger Things”

By Vlad Albescu

Equally influenced by Steven Spielberg’s family-adventure films, 80s nostalgia, Stephen King’s novels and John Carpenter’s retro synth soundscapes, “Stranger Things” was one of the best received shows of 2016. Not only did it gain a lot of popularity in a very short time, but it already feels like a classic. Last week, the second season was released on Netflix and continues to receive acclaim from both critics and audiences.

If you’ve finished binge-watching the newest episodes and you’re looking for similar stories, here are 15 movies to enjoy until next season.

15. Ghostbusters (1984)

ghostbusters-1984

Well, this is a little bit of a stretch, but if you’ve already seen Chapter Two of the second “Stranger Things” season, you must have noticed the boys’ Halloween costumes, which are exact replicas of the ones worn by Bill Murray and co. in “Ghostbusters.” And let’s not forget the famous theme song, which was featured during the episode and was also played during its credits.

This all-time classic follows four guys from New York (parapsychologists, to be exact) who form the Ghostbusters, a paranormal investigation and elimination service. Basically, they are ghost hunters.

“Ghostbusters” is one of the most entertaining action-comedies ever made. It’s funny and witty, fast-paced, has memorable performances from its cast, great special effects, and the catchiest theme song ever. Really, is there anyone out there who doesn’t like the “Ghostbusters” theme?

What you gonna watch? Ghostbusters!

14. I Am Not A Serial Killer (2016)

This 2016 quirky thriller flick flew under the radar of mainstream audiences despite being one of the most original films to come out in the last couple of years. The film stars Max Records as John, a troubled teenager who struggles with homicidal thoughts, and Christopher Lloyd → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

How To Shoot Where You’re Not Allowed

By Liz Nord

The team behind Netflix Original doc ‘One of Us’ had to develop tactics to film within a notoriously closed community.

What happens when the community you’re filming doesn’t want you there? What if the community members have a religious taboo against being shown on camera? Taking it even further, what if revealing your subject’s face might put them at risk? And what if, even after considering these things, you still decided your story must be told?

That is exactly the dilemma that faced celebrated documentarians, Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, when they embarked on their latest project, the Netflix Original film One of Us. In One of Us, the directing duo returns to the territory that garnered them an Oscar nomination in 2007 for Jesus Camp: extreme religious sects in America. In the new film, we travel far from the rural Evangelical Christian summer camps of Jesus Camp to a very different world: the Hasidic Jewish community in Brooklyn, New York.

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From:: No Film School

Canon EOS M100 shooting experience and gallery

Washington State is known as the Evergreen State, a slogan that is emblazoned on automotive license plates from Seattle to Spokane. New York is the Empire State. Montana is Big Sky Country, and Florida is the Sunshine State.

What about Idaho? Famous Potatoes.

Seems to me there’s a lot more to Idaho than just potatoes. Processed and cropped to taste in Adobe Camera Raw using the Camera Landscape color profile. Great exposure in full automatic mode.
ISO 200 | 1/250 sec | F2.8

While on a recent road trip through Idaho, this topic of state slogans came up with a few traveling companions who happen to live in state capital, Boise. In all fairness, it does look like there is an updated slogan. “Great Potatoes. Tasty Destinations.” Eh. Somehow, it still fails to capture any sense of the awesome beauty that I experienced on my first trip through the north-western part of the state, along the Snake River and Hells Canyon and through the Clearwater Mountains.

The primary reason for this trip was to get some more shooting time in with the Canon EOS 6D Mark II. But I also threw the new, beginner-friendly Canon EOS M100 with the 22mm F2 pancake prime into my jacket pocket for capturing some of the lighter moments on the trip.

And given just how much of a thing I have for large-sensor compact cameras with prime lenses, it shouldn’t be much of a surprise that I really, really enjoyed it.

What Canon got right

Not a bad parking spot. Processed to taste in Adobe Camera Raw using the Camera Neutral profile.
ISO 100 | 1/250 sec | F5.6

The most important thing that Canon got right with this camera is that it’s just fun to use. With a good → continue…

From:: DPreview

Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN ‘C’: hands-on and additional details

Hands-on with new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary

Sigma has used the Photo Plus Expo show in New York as a launchpad for an all-new lens – the 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary is a fast, high-quality prime for cropped-sensor Sony E-mount and M43 cameras.

In person, the new lens is a small, but beautifully well-made prime that fills a useful gap in focal lengths for both systems. On a Sony E-mount APS-C format camera, it is equivalent to 24mm, while on a Micro Four Thirds ILC it becomes an effective 32mm medium-wide.

Hands-on with new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary

Sony claims that despite being a ‘C’ (Contemporary) class lens, the new 16mm should have performance in line with the company’s premier ‘Art’ series. As far as build quality is concerned, that’s definitely true. Mechanically, this lens is gorgeous – something that is exemplified in the large, very smooth manual focusing ring.

Hands-on with new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary

At 92.3mm (3.6 inches) long, the 16mm is relatively small, but becomes a lot bigger with the included hood attached, beginning to dwarf the compact Sony a6300 shown in this image. But at 405g (14 oz) it’s relatively heavy for its size.

Hands-on with new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary

Optical construction comprises 16 elements in 13 groups, including two aspherical, two SLD (super-low dispersion) and three FLD (“F” low dispersion) elements. That’s an impressive number of specialized elements and the just-published MTF graphs suggest that sharpness at optimal apertures will be impressive.

Nine rounded aperture blades should ensure pleasant bokeh at wide apertures.

Hands-on with → continue…

From:: DPreview

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

We’re at the Photo Plus Expo show in New York, where Fujifilm is showing off its new XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR and GF 45mm F2.8 R WR prime lenses.

First up is the snappily-named XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR. It’s equivalent to a 122mm prime on X-series bodies, and as you can see, it’s a big lens. It also fills an appropriately big gap in Fujifilm’s historical lens lineup, being the first of Fuji’s X-mount lenses to give full 1:1 macro reproduction.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

As usual for Fujifilm’s current lenses, the 80mm offers the option of manual aperture control via a dedicated dial, and a large focusing ring provides very fine control over focus, if required.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

The XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR is optically stabilized, and is rated to provide around 5 stops of correction. This should help greatly in the macro focusing range, as well as making the lens more usable in general, in lower lighting conditions.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

Toggle switches on the lens barrel allow the photographer to restrict the lens’s focusing range, as well as activate / deactivate the OIS stabilization system. The XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR is weather sealed (that’s what the ‘WR’ means) and like all of Fujifilm’s high-end lenses, it’s built to a very high standard of construction.

The Fujifilm XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR will be available next month for $1200.

Hands-on with new Fujifilm X and GF lenses

<a target="_blank" href="http://www.dpreview.com/files/p/articles/9032943508/FujiLenses_handson-07.jpeg" → continue…

From:: DPreview

Field Test: The Charters Pole Might Actually Be a Selfie Stick for Giants

By Charles Haine

The Charters Pole is a carbon fiber extension tube designed for faster and easier camera and light placement.

“Is that a selfie stick for giants?” No less than three people asked us this while testing the Charters Pole on a recent afternoon here in New York. It’s a fair question, since its basic form factor resembles a selfie stick, only much, much bigger, and one that you could extend all the way out to almost 20 feet.

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From:: No Film School

Leica’s ‘new’ Thambar-M 90mm F2.2 costs $325 per aperture blade

Hands-on with Leica’s new classic 90mm Thambar

Leica’s newest lens is actually one of its oldest. The Leica Thambar-M 90mm F2.2 is a (slightly) modernized recreation of a classic 1930s design, famed for decades thanks to its unique soft focus rendering for portraits. At $6500 it costs a pretty penny too, which for our own amusement we figured works out to $325 for each of its 20 aperture blades.

We’re at the Photo Plus Expo show in New York, where we just got our hands on Leica’s latest crazy diamond. Click through for a closer look.

Hands-on with Leica’s new classic 90mm Thambar

Cosmetically, the new Thambar is virtually identical to the original. The biggest difference is that now, it’s designed natively for the M-mount rather than the original screw-mount (and 6-bit coded). As such, it can be used on modern rangefinders (like the M10 pictured above) without adaptation.

Sorry about the weird color balance in this image by the way. I have no excuse.

Hands-on with Leica’s new classic 90mm Thambar

Yes, that is a 20-bladed aperture. The optical construction of the new lens is the same as the original – four elements in three groups – but in a grudging concession to the needs of photographers in the mid 20th Century, the elements are now single-coated.

Hands-on with Leica’s new classic 90mm Thambar

There are two reasons the original Thambar is famed among Leica collectors. One is its scarcity, and the other is its unique rendering. ‘Soft-focus’ would be a bit of an oversimplification – its more of an etherial glow. I can’t describe the appearance very well in words, but people who love it really love it. The → continue…

From:: DPreview

First look at upcoming Pentax ‘star series’ lenses and silver edition K-1

First look at upcoming Pentax 50mm F1.4 and 11-18mm F2.8 lenses

Ricoh is showing off two upcoming lenses at the Photo Plus Expo show in New York this week. The HD Pentax-D FA* 50mm F1.4 SDM AW is designed for full-frame cameras, while the HD Pentax-DA* 11-18mm F2.8 is intended to be paired with the company’s APS-C DSLRs.

We weren’t able to get our hands on the new lenses, sadly – they’re still under glass – but we’re told that they’re cosmetically near-final. Click through for a closer look.

First look at upcoming Pentax 50mm F1.4 and 11-18mm F2.8 lenses

We’ve known about the HD Pentax-D FA* 50mm F1.4 SDM AW for a while, but the last time we saw it (also under glass) it was little more than a lens-shaped lump of plastic. Things have advanced since then, and the copy on show here appears to be a working prototype.

The upcoming 50mm is one of a new generation of ‘star series’ lenses that Ricoh intends for high-resolution imaging with its flagship K-1 and (presumably) follow-up full-frame models.

First look at upcoming Pentax 50mm F1.4 and 11-18mm F2.8 lenses

The 50mm F1.4 will come with a generously proportioned lens hood. The ‘AW’ in the designation stands for ‘All Weather’ and denotes environmental sealing, which should mean that like the K-1, it will stand up to use in harsh conditions.

A new ring-type SDM autofocus drive promises fast, quiet focusing. Pricing has yet to be announced, but the new 50mm should be available in spring of next year.

First look at upcoming Pentax 50mm F1.4 and 11-18mm F2.8 lenses

Meanwhile, the HD Pentax-DA* 11-18mm F2.8 is intended to be paired with the → continue…

From:: DPreview

Sonic Union Expands, Launching New Bryant Park Space Led By Joe O’Connell

By Press Kitchen

NEW YORK

New York audio powerhouse Sonic Union is expanding with the launch of a new studio and creative lab overlooking Bryant Park to further accommodate clients’ evolving needs. The uptown location will focus on growth…

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From:: Shoot OnLine

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

Two months ago Canon announced four new L-series prime lenses: the TS-E 50mm, 90mm and 135mm F2.8L Macro and the 85mm F1.4L. We’re at the Photo Plus Expo in New York, and we just got our hands on them. Click-through for some images and first impressions.

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

All of the new TS-E lenses are (like all tilt-shift designs) manual focus, and all feature broad, well-damped focus rings. The TS-E 90mm F2.8L Macro (shown above) covers a classic portraiture focal length and should be useful for both portraiture and product photography.

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

While people tend to associate tilt-shift lenses with landscape photography, short and medium-telephoto designs are very handy for portraits, where it can be difficult to maintain sharp focus on a subject’s eyes (both of them) at wide apertures.

Similarly, close-up product images and macro photography where it isn’t always practical or desirable to stop down too much for increased depth of field. Using a tilt-shift lens, sharpness can be maintained across the depth of a subject, without sacrificing background blur.

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

This is the 135mm F2.8L Macro – unsurprisingly, a larger and heavier lens than the 90mm pictured in the previous slide. All three of Canon’s new TS-E primes feature the same basic tilt-shift mechanism, offering a wider range of adjustments compared to Canon’s older lenses, and updated coatings. In the 135mm F4L, SubWaveLength Structure Coating (SWC) helps reduce flare and ghosting.

Hands-on with new Canon L-series primes

Unlike Canon’s more conventional L-series lenses, the TS-E range is not (and has never been) → continue…

From:: DPreview

Hands-on with the impressively small Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III

Hands-on with new Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III

Canon’s new PowerShot G1 X Mark III combines a 24MP APS-C sensor and hybrid autofocus system in a pricey but impressively compact body. Canon has been showing it to us at the Photo Plus Expo show in New York, and we’ve compiled some first impressions of how it handles.

Hands-on with new Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III

As should be obvious from this photograph, the G1 X Mark III is very small indeed, for an APS-C format camera. Despite being barely larger than the 1″ format PowerShot G5 X, the G1 X Mark III’s sensor and Dual Pixel autofocus system are lifted directly from the company’s latest APS-C DSLRs.

Unlike the G5 X or Canon’s Rebel-series DSLRs though, the G1 X Mark III offers weather-sealing. We didn’t get the chance to soak it with water yet, but just from initial impressions of this late pre-production sample, build quality seems excellent (which it should, for a compact camera at this price).

Hands-on with new Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III

A front control dial isn’t in quite the same position as it is in Canon’s DSLRs, but it works in exactly the same way. Our model for these shots has pretty small hands, but even with my big banana fingers, the G1 X Mark III is comfortable to hold and the manual controls are (by and large) easy to find by touch.

The 24-72mm F2.8-5.6 sacrifices brightness and zoom range for size, but covers a useful range for everyday photography. Despite the relatively slow aperture at 70mm, autofocus is fast and impressively positive, even in the very dim conditions of a show floor meeting room. Obviously this → continue…

From:: DPreview

Tamron unveils lightweight 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 ultra-telephoto zoom for $800

Tamron just revealed its newest ultra-telephoto zoom. Meet the Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A035) for full-frame Canon and Nikon DSLRs—a lens that combines compact, lightweight construction with ‘superior’ image quality and ‘fast and precise AF’, according to Tamron. The lens’ tagline: heavyweight performance in a lightweight lens.

The new lens was revealed this morning, and its claim to fame is its size and weight. At just 39.3 oz., the new 100-400mm lens is the lightest in its class thanks to the use of magnesium allow in ‘key areas’ of the lens barrel. Inside that barrel you’ll find 17 lens elements in 11 groups—including three low dispersion (LD) elements—and Tamron’s high-speed Dual MPU that allows for ‘fast and precise AF’ as well as four stops of stabilization.

Below are some sample photos captured with the new Tamron 100-400 F4.5-6.3 Di VC USD at the racetrack by photographer Takahito Mizutani for Tamron:

The Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 Di VC USD will be available starting November 16th, in both Canon and Nikon mounts, for $800. To find out more or see more impressive sample photos, read the full press release below or head over to the Tamron website.

Press Release

100-400mm F/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A035)

Tamron announces the launch of a new ultra-telephoto zoom lens with fast and precise AF, superior image quality and a lightweight, compact design

October 26, 2017, Commack, New York— Tamron USA, Inc. , announces the launch of a new ultra-telephoto zoom lens, 100-400mm F/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A035), for full-frame Canon and Nikon DSLR cameras. The Model A035 delivers fast and precise AF performance and consistently powerful VC (Vibration Compensation) 4 stops*1 benefits thanks to the high-speed Dual MPU (Micro-Processing Unit) control system that is found in the latest Tamron lens models. The → continue…

From:: DPreview

Sigma Introduces 16mm Lens for Sony E and Micro Four Thirds

By Daron James

Sigma unveils new 16mm F1.4 DC DN lens for filmmakers looking for fast and wide shooting.

At PhotoPlus Expo in New York this week, Sigma has released its latest lens designed for APS-C mirrorless cameras including Sony E mount and Micro Four Thirds. The 16mm F1.4 DC DN is part of the Contemporary lens line and as the name suggests, features a max aperture of F1.4 with “DC” denoting APS-C sized sensors and “DN” for Micro Four Thirds, as we illustrated previously in our Sigma lens 101 article.

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From:: No Film School

Sony a7R III first look video

Sony took the wraps off its a7R III this morning, and we’ve been able to spend a little time checking out its standout features. Dan and Richard are on the ground in New York at Sony’s launch event, and have put together a quick video showing what’s new and cool.

Read all about the a7R III and keep an eye out for sample photos and more in the near future!

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From:: DPreview

Demo: Here is the Sony a7R III shooting at 10 fps

News of the Sony a7R III is hot off the press and we’ve just gotten some hands-on time with the camera at an event in New York. So what’s the first thing to try? Why, 10 fps mechanical shutter bursts, with continuous autofocus, of course. It’s impressive on paper and sure enough, it’s darn impressive in person. Take a look for yourself.

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From:: DPreview

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