National Geographic

Photo of the week: Shooting portraits of the Himba people in Namibia

My photography heroes are Steve McCurry, Sebastiao Salgado, Jimmy Nelson and Joey L for his work in Africa, India and Syria. Their work has always inspired me, being at once raw and gritty, and at the same time revealing a bullet-proof dignity in their subjects. I would love to be able to work in this space myself.

I understand that it’s a different era now and that grabbing a job at National Geographic is not a realistic option. I also know that no one is coming to knock on my door to hire me for this sort of work just because I would love to do it. There are no favours in this industry. If I ever manage to make this sort of work my full time job it will be because I have already proved that I could produce quality imagery in this area.

So I recently packed my bags and gear and headed to a country which has always held a special interest for me: Namibia. I went to the tribal homelands of the Himba people and organized through a local guide to head into one of the villages for golden hour, for two evenings in a row, to shoot portraits with them.

On the first evening I went in I found this lovely little girl sitting with her Grandmother. She was shy and watching me as I shot with some of her family, and every time I looked over she hid her face and giggled. After a few minutes though her grandmother called me over and wanted me to take a shot of the two of them together, and after a couple of minutes the little girl opened up and I managed to grab these two shots. For obvious reasons, I try to share them as a pair whenever possible.

I → continue…

From:: DPreview

Canon’s ME20F-SH Multi-Purpose Camera Enables Viewers to ‘See in the Dark’ on National Geographic’s ‘Earth Live’

By Posted by Jody Michelle Solis, Editor

Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is proud to congratulate the team behind the National Geographic’s live television special “Earth Live”. The two-hour broadcast featured a live-production first, by using Canon’s ME20F-SH Multi-Purpose Camera along with a variety of Canon lenses, including the CINE-SERVO 50-1000mm T5.0-8.9 EF to show television viewers live images of illusive nocturnal wildlife from around the world at night, in color, without using artificial lighting. Hosted by award-winning actress Jane Lynch and award-winning television personality Phil Keoghan, the unprecedented two-hour event gave viewers an unfiltered, real-time broadcast feed to see Earth’s wildlife in various natural habitats with the use of 51 cameras shooting simultaneously in 25 different locations across six continents. The show premiered on National Geographic, Nat Geo WILD and Nat Geo MUNDO on Sunday, July 9, and aired in 171 countries and 45 languages.

Working closely with National Geographic, executive producer Al Berman’s idea for “Earth Live” involved several locations that were in total darkness during the live production and those dark locations would either require lights that would disturb wildlife, or the use of infrared or thermal cameras, which didn’t suit Berman’s idea. It wasn’t until 2015 when Canon debuted the ME20F-SH Multi-Purpose Camera that Berman saw the opportunity to broadcast undisturbed nocturnal wildlife in color. The announcement of this revolutionary four million ISO, full-frame sensor camera that can shoot full-color video in extreme low-light conditions, immediately caught the attention of Berman, who approached Canon U.S.A. with his idea. The Company’s technical support team worked closely with Berman and his crew to provide and test equipment to help bring this concept to life.

“The Canon ME20F-SH camera made it possible to do the show, and we were awed by the footage this camera was able to → continue…

From:: Student Filmmakers

NatGeo and Airbnb will send two people to view the eclipse from a private jet

Two lucky people will get to view the August 21st solar eclipse from a private jet above the clouds thanks to Airbnb and National Geographic, proceeded by a night in a geodesic dome in the Oregon wilderness. The experience is being offered by the two companies in the form of a contest, which you can enter now on Airbnb’s website. Those who go on the private flight will be among the first to see the solar eclipse.

According to Airbnb, the night before the eclipse will be spent in the geodesic dome located near hiking and rock-climbing destination Smith Rock in the Oregon wilderness. The duo will be accompanied by Yale University astrophysicist Dr. Jedidah Isler and National Geographic photographer and science journalist Babak Tafreshi.

An observation deck on the dome includes multiple telescopes, and as you gaze at the heavens Isler will answer questions related to astrophysics while Tafreshi teaches you how to photograph the night sky… not bad. But that’s not the best part.

On August 21st, the two winners, Isler, and a crew will take off from the Redmond Municipal Airport and fly two hours west, at which point the flight will turn around and head back toward land along the Path of Totality, giving everyone onboard an extended, unique view of the total solar eclipse.

Anyone 21 years old or older from the U.S. or Canada can enter the contest. Winners will need to travel to Seattle, Washington on August 20, and must have passports that are valid for at least six months following the date of the adventure. The full list of rules and conditions are listed on Airbnb’s website.

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From:: DPreview

Canon’s ME20F-SH Multi-Purpose Camera Enables Viewers to ‘See in the Dark’ on National Geographic’s ‘Earth Live’

By Canon Rumors Canon Camera Technology Allows Television Audiences to Enjoy a Live-Broadcast First: Wildlife in Full Color at Night MELVILLE, N.Y., August 2, 2017 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is proud to congratulate the team behind the National Geographic’s live television special “Earth Live”. The two-hour broadcast featured a live-production first, by using … → continue…

From:: Canon Rumors

The breathtaking winners of Nat Geo’s Travel Photographer of the Year 2017

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 Winners

Photo and caption by Sergio Tapiro Velasco/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

Grand Prize and 1st Place, Nature: The power of nature

Powerful eruption of Colima Volcano in Mexico on December 13th, 2015. That night, the weather was dry and cold, friction of ash particles generated a big lightning of about 600 meters that connected ash and volcano, and illuminated most of the dark scene. On last part of 2015, this volcano showed a lot of eruptive activity with ash explosions that raised 2-3 km above the crater. Most of night explosions produced incandescent rock falls and lightning not bigger than 100 meters in average.

National Geographic has announced the winners of its coveted Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 competition.

The grand prize and 1st place in the Nature category was awarded to Mexican photographer Sergio Tapiro Velasco, whose stunning photograph of the erupting Colima Volcano, complete with lightning strike, beat out over 15,000 entries from photographers in more than 30 countries.

In addition to the $2,500 prize that all category winners receive Velasco will also receive a ten-day trip for two to the Galápagos Archipelago with National Geographic Expeditions.

Check out the full winners gallery at this link.

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 Winners

Photo and caption by Hiromi Kano/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

2nd Place, Nature: To live.

Swans who live vigorous even in mud.

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 Winners

Photo and caption by Tarun Sinha/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

3rd Place, Nature: Crocodiles at Rio Tarcoles

This image was captured → continue…

From:: DPreview

Behind the shot: A mother grizzly and her cub go salmon fishing

A sow and her cub walk across a log on a small creek in Yukon, Canada, searching for salmon. Photo © Peter Mather

Wildlife and nature photographer Peter Mather had been photographing this creek in Yukon, Canada for years before he had an idea: set up a camera trap on a fallen tree. He figured grizzly bears would use the tree for salmon fishing, and thought it would be worth seeing what his remote camera could capture.

But even at his most optimistic, he didn’t expect to capture a shot this good. A photo of a sow and her cub that would earn him recognition from National Geographic and a spot as one of the best wildlife images and a top spot in the Big Picture Natural World Photography Competition.

Mather tells DPReview the story behind the photo, in his own words:

For 3 years, I had been photographing salmon in this small creek that flows into the Yukon River. I was trying to get an over/under night photo of king salmon spawning under the northern lights, so I was out all night, every night in this salmon infested creek for a week.

I’d seen one grizzly in the creek. A young shy male. I figured that there weren’t many bears around, because the salmon stocks are plummeting and the area has been heavily hunted for bears. I knew of this great tree that fell on the side of the creek located 5 minutes downstream from where I was trying my salmon and northern lights photo, and I figured bears would use it to fish off, so I set up a motion detecting camera trap on it.

I left the camera for 3 days, when I returned I was ‘over the moon’ ecstatic to find → continue…

From:: DPreview

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