NASA

NASA captured photos and video of the ISS ‘photobombing’ today’s solar eclipse

The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Photo credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Plenty of people were pointing their cameras up at the solar eclipse today, but leave it to NASA to capture a little something extra. From his vantage point in Banner, Wyoming, NASA photo editor Joel Kowsky captured a dual eclipse of sorts: the moon obscuring the sun, and the tiny pinprick of the International Space Station obscuring a little bit of what was left.

As the ISS and its six crew members flew in front of the partially obscured disk of the sun, Kowsky had both still and slow motion video cameras trained on his target.

Here’s a closer crop of the photograph above:

Here, a composite that shows the ISS’s full transit across the partial eclipse:

And, finally, a slow motion video of the transit, recorded by Kowsky at 1,500 frames a second:

To see these photos and video in their full glory, head over to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flickr account.


All photos and video courtesy of NASA/Joel Kowsky

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From:: DPreview

10 Highly Anticipated Future Productions By Acclaimed Directors

By Luc Hinrichsen

Normally, Taste of Cinema is a platform for looking into the glorious (or not so glorious) past of cinema. This list will take an opposite approach and examine some future productions by acclaimed directors.

10. First Man (Damien Chazelle)

After his surpassing success of “La La Land”, Damien Chazelle has another iron in the fire. His next project is a biopic of astronaut Neil Armstrong, adapted from the biography “First Man: A Life Of Neil A. Armstrong”. Born in Ohio in 1930, Armstrong served in the US Army in Korea in the 50s and was a test pilot for the NASA. In 1969, he was the first person who travelled to the moon and back.

This movie marks the second collaboration between the director and Ryan Gosling, whose teamplay proved to be very prolific, regarding award wins and huge box office successes. The screenplay is written by Oscar winner Josh Singer (he won the trophy for “Spotlight” in 2016), and the movie will be released in October 2018.

9. If Beale Street Could Talk (Barry Jenkins)

Other than Chazelle, Barry Jenkins is the shooting star of the directing sphere of Hollywood in 2017. His second feature film, “Moonlight”, gained him an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay and was a massive success.

His next production is an adaption of the 1974 novel “If Beale Street Could Talk” by James Baldwin. Set in Harlem, the original tells the story about Tish and Fonny, an engaged couple whose relationship is put to the test after Fonny is falsely accused of rape. While pregnant, she tries to prove his innocence before the birth of their baby.

Jenkins wrote the screenplay during his work on “Moonlight” – a time he obviously was in a brilliant state of creativity. “To translate the power → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

NASA Curiosity Rover captures rare photographs of clouds on Mars

Clouds drift across the sky above a Martian horizon in this photograph captured on July 17, 2017 by the Navcam on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/York University

Last month, NASA’s Curiosity Rover captured something (appropriately enough) curious in the Martian sky: clouds. Specifically, Curiosity snapped several sequences of “wispy, early-season clouds resembling Earth’s ice-crystal cirrus clouds” that NASA is calling “the most clearly visible so far” since the Rover landed 5 years and 5 days ago.

As NASA explains in a news release:

Researchers used Curiosity’s Navigation Camera (Navcam) to take two sets of eight images of the sky on an early Martian morning last month. For one set, the camera pointed nearly straight up. For the other, it pointed just above the southern horizon. Cloud movement was recorded in both and was made easier to see by image enhancement.

Each sequence of 8 images was enhanced and turned into an animated GIF:

To learn more about these photos and the science behind why there are clouds on Mars, and why they were a lot more common billions of years ago, head over to the NASA news release by clicking here.


All photos courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/York University

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From:: DPreview

NASA will chase the August eclipse in jets to capture ‘clearest images of the corona to date’

It doesn’t matter where you’ll be during the August 21st solar eclipse, NASA plans to one-up you and capture a better photo—or at least a unique one. The space agency is actually going to chase the eclipse’s totality in two WB-57F jets, in order to capture the ‘clearest image of the sun’s […] corona to date,’ and the first-ever thermal images of Mercury.

The whole plan is detailed in the short video above, although we have to warn you, it might make you feel a little bit of gear envy—”if only I’d bought that full-frame fighter jet…”

Joking aside, the August 21st eclipse is a brilliant research opportunity, and NASA doesn’t plan to let it slip by unused. The two WB-57F jets have each been retrofitted with twin telescopes mounted on their noses. Using these telescopes, Amir Caspi of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado plans to capture “the clearest images of the Sun’s outer atmosphere — the corona — to date and the first-ever thermal images of Mercury.”

One of the WB-57F jets is readied for a test run at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The instruments are mounted under the silver casing on the nose of the plane. Photo: NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Norah Moran

According to NASA, the jets will capture high-definition pictures at 30fps during the entire eclipse totality—which will last three times longer as the jets speed along, staying inside the moon’s shadow—from the stratosphere, avoiding interference from most of the Earths atmosphere. These photos will then be analyzed to determine why the sun’s atmosphere is so hot (millions of degrees), when the visible surface of the sun is significantly cooler (a few thousand degrees).

Before and after these observations, the scientists will → continue…

From:: DPreview

NASA mounts Sony a7S II on outside of ISS

By noreply@redsharknews.com (RedShark News Staff)

Japan from around 400km up...

Sony has released a variety of 4K footage captured by the 7S II full-frame mirrorless camera that has become the first off-the-shelf camera mounted on the outside of the International Space Station to capture 4K.

  • space photography
  • Sony a7S II
  • ISS

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    From:: RedShark News

    This video compares a $50 Sony camcorder with a $50,000 RED Epic Dragon

    Ever wonder whether a more expensive camera is truly worth the cost? Sam and Niko of Corridor recently set out to compare footage from a $50 Sony HD camcorder and the RED Epic Dragon, a $50,000 6K cinema camera. As you’d expect, the differences are immediately apparent, cost aside, when the two cameras are put side-by-side: the RED camera’s lens alone is about the same size as the entire Sony camcorder.

    The RED Epic Dragon has proven capable many times throughout its life, with perhaps one of the model’s most notable achievements being a trip into space where it was used by NASA astronauts to capture images from the International Space Station. The RED camera has also been used for several major Hollywood movies. The Sony HD camcorder used in the video, however, is a simple model with a low price point aimed at the average consumer.

    At nearly 15 minutes in length, the comparison video above runs through several major aspects of both cameras’ footage, looking at things like noise level, exposure, low-light performance, post-processing results and more. As expected, the RED camera dominates in each category. More of the team’s videos can be found on the ‘Sam and Niko‘ YouTube channel.

    Via: iso1200

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    From:: DPreview