Micro Four Thirds

DJI launches Zenmuse X7 Super 35mm camera module with Raw video capture

DJI has launched the Zenmuse X7, a Raw video capable Super 35 camera module. The camera/gimbal system which mounts to the company’s drones features a new, proprietary lens mount.

The camera can shoot 6K CinemaDNG Raw or 5.2K Apple ProRes footage at up to 30p or 3.9K CinemaDNG and 2.7K ProRes at up to 59.94p. The company claims 14 stops of dynamic range but, like all video manufacturers, doesn’t specify how this is assessed.

It uses the new “DJI Cinema Color System” based around a D-Log Curve and D-Gamut RGB color space.

The camera includes two exposure modes, one that varies amplification gain and an “EI” mode that always uses minimal amplification (~base ISO) with metadata tags to denote the intended final brightness, to preserve DR. This is increasingly common practice in the video sphere but has yet to make its way across to stills photography.

The previous model (the Zenmuse X5) was based around a Micro Four Thirds mount and came with a distinctly Panasonic-like 15mm F1.7 lens. Instead the Zenmuse X7 is based around the company’s own ‘DL’ mount.

Alongside the camera, the company is releasing 16mm, 24mm, 35mm and 50mm F2.8 lenses, the longest three of which will include mechanical shutters. The carbon fiber bodied lenses will cost $1,299 each, with the exception of the 50mm, which is $100 cheaper, though a camera bundled with all four lenses will cost just $4,299.

The camera on its own will cost around $2699 and will be available from November.

Press Release:

DJI Reveals Zenmuse X7, The World’s First Super 35 Digital Film Camera Optimized for Professional Aerial Cinematography

Superior Image Quality, Interchangeable Lenses, and a New Color System Deliver Complete Creative Freedom

October 11, 2017 – DJI, the world’s leader in civilian drones and aerial imaging technology, today introduced the Zenmuse X7, the world’s first Super 35 → continue…

From:: DPreview

10 macro photography tips for beginners

1. The Lens

There are several good lens options out there for macro photography. You could use extension tubes combined with a normal lens, which gives you some magnification; or, even better, you could reverse a normal lens which, when combined with extension tubes, gives even more magnification.

The most convenient and flexible option though, especially for a beginner within macro photography, is to get a dedicated macro lens.

The most popular models come in focal lengths between 90-105 mm, and have a 1:1 magnification ratio. There are also shorter focal lengths such as 50 or 60mm, but these have shorter working distances, which means you have to get very close to your subject and risk scaring it away. 1:1 magnification means that, when you focus as closely as possible, your subject is as big on the sensor as it is in real life. So if you have a full frame sensor of 36×24 mm, it means that any insect you want to shoot that is 36mm long just about fits in your picture.

If you use an APS-C or Micro Four Thirds camera, you will get your subject magnified even more at 1x, as the sensor is smaller. These normal, 1:1 macro lenses are made by most major brands, such as Sigma’s 105mm, Canon’s 100 mm, Nikon’s 105mm, Samyang’s 100mm, Tamron’s legendary 90mm, Sony’s 90mm and Tokina’s 100mm. They cost around $400-$1,000, and they are all sharp and a great value for the money.

Many of these lenses have image stabilization, which is a good thing, as it makes composition a lot easier. Have a look at reviews and buy one that you like. You can’t go wrong with a ~100mm 1:1 macro → continue…

From:: DPreview

Third party mounts available for Fujinon MK Cinema Zooms [Video]

By noreply@redsharknews.com (David Shapton)

Third party mounts available for Fujinon MK Cinema Zooms [Video]

We caught up with Mark Horner, Marketing Manager, Fujifilm Europe at the Recent IBC show in Amsterdam, with good news for Micro Four Thirds camera owners

  • Fijonon
  • IBC
  • IBC 2017
  • Cinema Zooms
  • MK
  • MK cinema zooms

    → continue…

    From:: RedShark News