Micro Four Thirds

Lensbaby introduces Burnside 35 with variable vignetting

Lensbaby has announced the Burnside 35, which it calls an adaptation of the Petzval lens design with the added benefit of an effect slider to adjust the strength of vignetting and bokeh. The gold-anodized slider is located on the side of the lens barrel and operates a second iris, adding more or less vignette effect and adjusting the appearance of bokeh.

The manual focus lens is designed for full-frame and crop-sensor cameras and will be offered in Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony A, Pentax K, Micro Four Thirds, Sony E, Fujifilm X and Samsung NX mount. It’s on sale now for $500.

Lensbaby Delivers a Modern Take on Classic Lenses with the Burnside 35

Portland, OR (February 15, 2018) – Lensbaby—makers of award-winning creative effects lenses, optics and accessories—announces the launch of an entirely new kind of creative effects lens, the Burnside 35.

The first ever wide angle adaptation of the Petzval lens design, this 35mm f/2.8 lens creates images with a large, bright central area of sharp focus and striking color rendition surrounded by variable, swirling bokeh and vignette. It also features an effect slider that operates as a second internal iris that changes the shape and amount of swirl in the bokeh; all while adding or removing vignette and center brightness.

Burnside’s 35mm focal length lets you capture a scene at a normal-wide perspective with a dimensionality that makes your subject jump off the page. This lens opens up a new world of creative possibilities for those shooting street photography, landscapes, environmental portraits and more.

“The Burnside 35 is one of the most versatile Lensbabies we’ve made,” said Lensbaby Chief Creative Officer and Co-Founder Craig Strong. “It gives you the ability to have a strong or subtle creative effect in a single lens, a lens you might just → continue…

From:: DPreview

Panasonic Lumix G9 vs Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Introduction

Announced late last year, the Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 gives Micro Four Thirds shooters looking for a high performance stills-oriented camera another option. Previously, the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II was more or less alone in its class, and remained unchallenged for over a year (unless you count the video-focused GH5 as a direct competitor). Even considering its age, the E-M1 II still fetches a $2000 body-only price, with the G9 undercutting it slightly at $1700 body-only.

So how do these Micro Four Thirds flagships compare head-to-head? Take a look at our feature-by-feature breakdown.

Image quality

The G9 and E-M1 II both use a 20MP Four Thirds sensor, and it’s fair to say they match up pretty evenly in this category. They do of course use different processors, which will make a difference, and Panasonic has made a lot of effort to refine the G9’s JPEG engine since the GH5. But we’d expect them to perform quite similarly, and broadly speaking they do.

Analyzing each camera’s performance in our studio testing, the E-M1 II produces slightly nicer JPEG sharpening and colors at base ISO, but the G9 pulls just ahead at high ISO. The difference is subtle, but it’s one we noticed.

Both cameras offer a high-resolution mode, assembling a large file from multiple images taken while shifting the sensor slightly. The E-M1 II’s JPEG output is rendered at 50MP while Panasonic chooses to output 80MP, but both produce an 80MP Raw file. There’s some question over whether you really get 4x the resolution from this pixel-shift method.

If you’re very picky and base ISO JPEG rendering is a priority, we think the E-M1 II holds a slight advantage

These modes are best suited for → continue…

From:: DPreview