London

Eddie – a Short Shady Retro Science Fiction Film by John Lynch

By John Lynch

My name is John Lynch, and I live and work mostly in London. By day I’m a professional filmmaker for various brands and charities, but by night I’m trying to get a retro science fiction film universe off the ground. Same as most people, I guess?

The first big step towards that goal was taking time out from work to go out into the Scottish wilderness to shoot Eddie. It’s a short introduction to the world of a shady, ubiquitous mega-corporation called Overhead created by my good friend Jon Williams-Nobbs. At this point you really should watch the film… because later I’m going to quiz you on how you think it was made.

Name and age: John Lynch, 33 years old.

Currently based in: London, UK.

Language (s) spoken: English, very very basic Spanish, hmmm… does the language of cinema count?

Occupation: Professional Corporate & Commercial Filmmaker.

How did you get started in our industry? I’ve always been a film nut, even from a young age. When I was 16 I started making video sketches for a theatre and comedy sketch group I was part of. From there I went on to study film at University. I moved to London after Uni and I lost my way slightly. Struggling to get a job, I somehow ended up as a video technician for a corporate events company. I did that for a few years, then went freelance and slowly but surely moved away from the live events back to filmmaking just as the DSLR revolution and the birth of the ‘social media video’ happened. Since then, I’ve been directed and produced for all kinds of clients and agencies. I’ve directed cinema ads, worked as a specialist camera supervisor at the Olympics and even helped out on a → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Interview with Anthem Studios Regarding Making Life of Bri’ n Chris

By Posted by Jody Michelle Solis, Editor

Continuous effort will always bring substantial results. So does the 3d short animation: Life of Bri’ n Chris. Although with limited human resource and budget, Anthem studios tried their best to solve the tough difficulties and finally released the 8-minutes 3d animation. Great congratulations to them. And thanks Michael Wakelam so much for offering the opportunity for the short interview between Fox Renderfarm and Anthem Studios as below.

Fox Renderfarm: Hi Michael, would you please give a brief introduction about yourself and your studio?

Anthem Studios: My name’s Michael Wakelam and I founded Anthem Studios in 2012 with a vision to bring entertaining stories and new characters to life. We’re based in London and work in a variety of styles using various software.

Fox Renderfarm: So when and how did you get into the CG industry?

Anthem Studios: I started through TV design and then got into motion design and branding. I started to develop more knowledge and interest in visual effects and animation and then as I grew in experience, I really wanted bring my love of stories and characters together with animation.

Fox Renderfarm: Wow, sounds great, then what is your most satisfied work in these years and why?

Anthem Studios: I’m most proud of Life of Bri’ n Chris, because it was so ambitious as a project. Most short films of this length have a huge crew, ours was a core crew of 7 or 8, with a bunch of other people helping out in little ways. We had no budget but had generous support of a few key partners, such as Fox Render Farm, Chaos Group and Adelphoi Music.

Fox Renderfarm: That’s amazing, while since your new short film Life of Bri’ n Chris is going to be online soon, would you please share with us about what’s the story and why you → continue…

From:: Student Filmmakers

Laura Poitras Talks Assange, Her Final Version of Risk and Trump’s Tax Returns

By Brandon Harris

Just now released on Showtime, Laura Poitras’s Risk, which found its way to theaters in May via upstart distributor Neon, is in a vastly different form than when it premiered last year in Cannes. The documentary traces a thread running counter to the moral certitude heard from our politicians, mostly on the right, about the role of leaks in degrading democracy. Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, the film’s primary subject, has been confined to the Ecuadorian embassy in London for nearly five years following allegations — and, later, charges — of sexual assault against two Swedish women. (The rape charge was recently […] → continue…

From:: Filmmaker Magazine