JPEG

Fujifilm X-H1: What you need to know

Introduction

The Fujifilm X-H1 arrived in the last few hours of February 14th, at least out here on the West Coast in the US, making it a Valentine’s gift that came in just under the wire for the Fujifilm faithful. It’s deserving of a big red bow with a range-topping APS-C 24MP X-Trans sensor, sitting above the X-T2. It builds on many of the X-T2’s features by adding in-body image stabilization, a touchscreen and enhanced video options. Here’s a detailed look at everything that’s new and improved.

Image Quality

Given the camera’s pedigree and the initial results we’ve seen, the X-H1 looks highly capable of great image quality. The sensor, shared with the X-T2, has already shown itself to have performance comparable with the best of its APS-C peers, both in terms of dynamic range and noise performance at high ISO settings.

Throw in Fujifilm’s excellent film simulation modes (plus a bonus new one!), and you’ve got a mighty tempting camera for stills shooters. However, the camera’s unique X-Trans color filter pattern is worth taking into account – your results will vary greatly depending on your Raw conversion software.

Further enticing stills photographers is the X-H1’s healthy 14 fps burst rate with electronic shutter and 8 fps with mechanical shutter (which can be boosted to 11 with an optional grip). Buffer depth looks reasonably good too, allowing for 40 JPEG shots or 23 uncompressed Raws (27 compressed). Fujifilm also promises autofocus improvement, with better performance in low light and at smaller apertures. All excellent news.

Image Stabilization

Despite Fujifilm previously suggesting that it couldn’t be done, the X-H1 offers in-body stabilization rated up to 5 stops. Unusually, Fujifilm says the system works better with non-IS lenses because they → continue…

From:: DPreview

Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9: What you need to know

Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9: What you need to know

Nominally at least, the new Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 is the successor to the GX8. But while it has a lot in common with the earlier model, the new camera comes with some serious updates, and a couple of caveats. In some ways in fact, the GX9 can be thought of as a step-up model from the GX85, rather than as a direct successor to the more expensive GX8.

We’ve had access to a pre-production GX9 for a few days, and we’ve been digging into its feature set. Here’s what you need to know.

No low-pass filter

The GX9 incorporates the same 20MP Micro Four Thirds sensor as its predecessor, but omits the low-pass filter found on previous models. JPEG shooters might not see much of a difference, but this should allow you to eke out a little more detail in low-ISO Raw files.

Redesigned shutter – no more ‘shutter shock’

The GX8 was a very likable camera, but at certain shutter speeds, we encountered issues with so-called ‘shutter shock’ when the vibration caused by the shutter movement blurred fine detail. We reported this issue to Panasonic at the time, and apparently they took it seriously. The GX9 features a redesigned shutter, which should result in a 90% reduction in shutter shock, compared to its predecessor. That’s according to Panasonic – obviously we’ll be testing it for ourselves as soon as possible.

As well as the mechanical shutter, you also have the option of engaging the silent, fully-electronic shutter from 1 – 1/16,000 sec. If you’re taking pictures in a very quiet environment, this is the way to go, but distortion might become an issue when shooting fast moving → continue…

From:: DPreview

How to shoot Log video using DJI’s D-Log color profile

One of the challenges of shooting video with a drone is dealing with high dynamic range lighting situations. Fortunately, many of DJI’s drones offer a useful picture profile called D-Log. It’s DJI’s implementation of a Log gamma curve, designed to capture as much tonal information as possible.

DJI’s standard picture profiles can be vivid and punchy, but similar to shooting JPEG format on a stills camera, using them can make it impossible to recover highlights or shadows if clipping occurs in high contrast scenes.

If you don’t need to shoot Log to capture the dynamic range of a scene, it may not be
the best choice

Using D-Log can give you more flexibility in your post-production by retaining a wider tonal range, allowing you more latitude to apply your color and style choices during editing. However, there’s no such thing as a free lunch; shooting in Log can reduce image quality by trying to compress too much tonal information into a limited number of bits in the file. If you’re shooting a high dynamic range scene that tradeoff may result in a net benefit. But if you don’t need to shoot Log to capture the dynamic range of a scene, it may not be the best choice.

In this article, I’ll show you how to set up the D-Log profile, how to expose for it, and provide some examples of what you can achieve by shooting in D-Log and using color lookup tables, or LUTS, to color grade the final footage.

Set up your DJI drone to shoot in D-Log

To set your Mavic Pro, Phantom, or Inspire to shoot in D-Log, make sure you’re in video mode and navigate to your camera settings. You’ll find D-Log under the ‘Color’ settings, along with all the other color profiles. Once → continue…

From:: DPreview

Panasonic Lumix G9 vs Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Introduction

Announced late last year, the Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 gives Micro Four Thirds shooters looking for a high performance stills-oriented camera another option. Previously, the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II was more or less alone in its class, and remained unchallenged for over a year (unless you count the video-focused GH5 as a direct competitor). Even considering its age, the E-M1 II still fetches a $2000 body-only price, with the G9 undercutting it slightly at $1700 body-only.

So how do these Micro Four Thirds flagships compare head-to-head? Take a look at our feature-by-feature breakdown.

Image quality

The G9 and E-M1 II both use a 20MP Four Thirds sensor, and it’s fair to say they match up pretty evenly in this category. They do of course use different processors, which will make a difference, and Panasonic has made a lot of effort to refine the G9’s JPEG engine since the GH5. But we’d expect them to perform quite similarly, and broadly speaking they do.

Analyzing each camera’s performance in our studio testing, the E-M1 II produces slightly nicer JPEG sharpening and colors at base ISO, but the G9 pulls just ahead at high ISO. The difference is subtle, but it’s one we noticed.

Both cameras offer a high-resolution mode, assembling a large file from multiple images taken while shifting the sensor slightly. The E-M1 II’s JPEG output is rendered at 50MP while Panasonic chooses to output 80MP, but both produce an 80MP Raw file. There’s some question over whether you really get 4x the resolution from this pixel-shift method.

If you’re very picky and base ISO JPEG rendering is a priority, we think the E-M1 II holds a slight advantage

These modes are best suited for → continue…

From:: DPreview