Jakob Owens

Nikon patents two full-frame mirrorless lenses: 52mm F0.9 and 36mm F1.2

Photo by Jakob Owens

Nikon users who are out there wishing for a full-frame mirrorless camera from the storied Japanese brand have two more reasons to feel hopeful today. It seems Nikon has filed two new patents for full-frame mirrorless lenses in Japan: one for a Nikon 52mm F0.9, and another for a 36mm F1.2.

The patents were spotted by Japanese site hi-lows-note, and come complete with a few lens diagrams so you can ogle the lens elements while you cross your fingers even tighter.

Here’s the 52mm F0.9 diagram:

And the 36mm F1.2:

It’s worth noting that this isn’t the first time Nikon has patented a full-frame mirrorless lens—two zoom lenses for FF mirrorless were patented three years apart, one in 2014 and another earlier this year. But while a patent does not a new lens confirm, the more of these lenses Nikon puts on paper, the more hopeful we’ll be that a full-frame Nikon mirrorless camera is on the way.

For more on that possibility, read the official statement Nikon sent us on their future mirrorless camera plans.

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From:: DPreview

Canon to launch new, partially-automated camera plant in Japan in 2019

Photo by Jakob Owens

Canon has revealed that it is building a new semi-automated camera plant in Japan, and that it expects to open the plant in 2019. The factory will be located in the Miyazaki Prefecture on a 300,000 square meter land parcel, marking this the first time Canon has built a new camera production facility in Japan since 2010. The plant will focus on producing single-lens reflex cameras, according to Nikkei.

This business move is part of a growing effort on Canon’s part to bring more of its production business back to its home nation, a move spurred in part by increased wages abroad. Though Canon had originally moved much of its production outside of Japan, the cost of domestic manufacturing has lowered thanks to factory automation technologies.

Per Nikkei’s report, Canon successfully brought 56% of its production back to Japan from overseas destinations last year, and it is working toward a goal of bringing that number up to 60%. In addition, Canon’s Oita Prefecture factory is said to be more than 70% automated, greatly reducing the number of laborers the company requires.

What will this mean for consumers? Hopefully lower prices, or at the very least a more economically efficient and cash-positive Canon.

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From:: DPreview