Italy

“Call Me By Your Name” – A Feature Film Shot with Only One 35mm Lens

By Jakub Han

Call Me By Your Name is a 2017 feature film directed by Luca Guadagnino shot around the city of Crema in Italy. What makes the cinematography of this feature interesting is that it was completely shot using only one 35mm lens.

Call Me By Your Name, Source: imdb.com

Thai cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, who shoots only on film, was glad to work as DP with the director on this romantic drama, and he appreciated the light conditions available as he walked around the locations prior to the production of the movie. Shooting the whole film with only one lens contributed to the simplicity of its cinematography.

Initially, this idea did not come from the DP itself, but from director Luca Guadagnino. Mukdeeprom gladly accepted the challenge, as he wanted to focus on different aspects of the cinematography other than the choice of focal length for each scene. In his own words Mukdeeprom said: “The producer asked me, should there be some other, wider lens? Just in case? I said ‘No, no. I want to tie my hand to this approach, because this is how I work. I think if you limit yourself to something, you struggle inside your idea”. I agree with him – by limiting one aspect of the puzzle, one can concentrate more on other aspects and therefore become more creative.

Mukdeeprom’s initial enthusiasm about the one-lens idea got him thinking. When he finally got the green light to employ it, he wasn’t so sure that it was right for the film at hand. For him as DP, it would mean a lot of extra work with planning the shots and knowing the film’s locations very well. But he kept at it and shot the film that way.

In this short cut-out from an interview Luca Guadagnino shortly explains what was the idea behind → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Manfrotto Manufacturing Tour

By Jon Fauer Lino Manfrotto was a photo journalist, based in Bassano del Grappa, Italy. He worked for Il Gazzettino and Il Giornale di Vicenza and also did industrial and advertising photography. By the late 1960s, he realized that his photo equipment was cumbersome, heavy and slow. There were many studio lights on the market, but Lino saw that they neglected the basic necessities. So, with the help of a colleague, Lino made his first product: a lightweight and a rugged lighting stand that extended high enough to be practical. Download our 11-page PDF Report of the Factory Visit to Manfrotto Manufacturing in Feltre. read more… → continue…

From:: FD Times

Canon accidentally shared a composite photo shot with a Fuji all over social media

Well… this is awkward. Fstoppers has caught Canon Italy and Canon Spain sharing a photo all of their social media accounts—Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram—the majority of which wasn’t even taken with a Canon camera. In fact, it was shot using a Fuji X-T1, by popular landscape and travel photographer Elia Locardi.

You can compare the two photos for yourself below, but there is little doubt that large parts of Elia’s photograph were used to create the one Canon shared:

The original photo, captured by Elia Locardi. Used with permission.
The image Canon Italy and Canon Spain have shared all over social media.

As you can see the entire sky, parts of the water, and some foreground elements as well were lifted directly from Elia’s original. In fact, as Fstoppers points out, there’s even a few-pixel-sized bird in Elia’s photo that was copied directly into the new shot.

We spoke to Elia this morning, and he told us that after a bit of sleuthing he was actually able to uncover the source of the image: a royalty free photograph on Unsplash that was allegedly taken in October of 2017 with a Canon 5D Mark IV. Elia has asked that we not “out” the photographer, but you can see the EXIF data in this screenshot:

From there, it doesn’t take an advanced degree to figure out what happened. A social media team at Canon Europe took to Unsplash to find a royalty free picture to share. They probably searched for “Canon 5D Mark IV” and “Italy,” and when they stumbled across this shot they had no idea that it was, in fact, not a single image but a composite of (at → continue…

From:: DPreview

Visiting Manfrotto Manufacturing in Feltre

By Jon Fauer Lino Manfrotto was a photo journalist, based in Bassano del Grappa, Italy. He worked for Il Gazzettino and Il Giornale di Vicenza and also did industrial and advertising photography. By the late 1960s, he realized that his photo equipment was cumbersome, heavy and slow. There were many studio lights on the market, but Lino saw that they neglected the basic necessities. So, with the help of a colleague, Lino made his first product: a lightweight and a rugged lighting stand that extended high enough to be practical. Download our 11-page PDF Report of the Factory Visit to Manfrotto Manufacturing in Feltre. read more… → continue…

From:: FD Times

The 10 Most Controversial Movie Directors of All Time

By Thor Magnusson

best lars von trier films

What defines a filmmaker as ‘controversial’? Certainly there are several directors that coast off the slogan that “no press is bad press” and do their best to stir the pot for shallow or promotional reasons (e.g. Tom Six), but to be a true ‘provocateur’ there needs to be substance behind the button pushing.

Other elements can come into to play (e.g. D.W. Griffith’s pro-KKK mentality), but the majority criteria for this article focuses on filmmakers that stand as unflappable personalities with uncompromisable visions, ones that don’t sit well with standard movie conventions. With that philosophy, it has them enter a place where that body of work that can’t be loved by all of the media or all viewers.

10. Pier Paolo Pasolini

Pier Paolo Pasolini

After a haphazard youth living through the fascist regime of World War II Italy, Pier Paolo Pasolini grew into a visible anti-establishment poet, who also was openly homosexual and shared strong Communist beliefs – all elements that made him a controversial persona in a sensitive time in the country’s history.

Still, it wasn’t until the man became a film director that he truly made waves on a major scale. His debut film “Accattone” (1961) was set in Rome’s grimy slums, filled with the dark underbelly of Italy’s postwar criminals and survivors; the film caused a stir with its unfiltered portrayal of life in a time when the country was attempting to turn its economic tides and sell a positive outlook.

Later, Pasolini’s short movie “La Ricotta” had the government try him for “offences toward the state and church” – it appeared even this early into his career, a target was on the man’s back. He had garnered an aura of a man who was willing to overturn and examine Italian society via visual → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

10 Great 2017 Movies You Should Add To Your Watchlist

By Vitor Guima

December is coming to an end and 2017 was a great year for film. With that in mind, here is an article dedicated to exploring some great movies from 2017 that should definitely be watched.

From an animation completely made with oil painting to a big homage to the fathers of cinema made by the director of one of the most acclaimed film festivals in the world, among amazing movies from countries like Cuba, Romania, Brazil, Finland, Italy and more, here is a selection of 10 great films from this year.

It is never too late to remember that many things interfere in the choice of the titles of an article like this, but as always, memory and personal preferences are the main factors. If you think any film from 2017 should be on this list, please leave it as a recommendation in the comments section below.

Also, some of the films that appear on this article might not have premiered yet in some countries or might even have been shown in other countries before, but the important part is that we are considering movies that premiered or were shown in festivals on 2017 here in São Paulo, Brazil, the place where this article is being written.

So, here are 10 great 2017 films you may have missed.

10. Loving Vincent (dir. Dorota Kobiela & Hugh Welchman)

“Loving Vincent” is the first film to be made entirely with oil painted animation, and is truly one of the best animated movies of the decade.

In this film, the story circles the last days of painter Vincent van Gogh. We follow Armand, a man who needs to deliver the final letter written by the artist, and when he arrives at Auvers-sur-Oise, he becomes interested in van → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema