DSLR

Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded

In the first part of this series, I talked about shooting Kilauea’s lava surface-flows using a drone. Now, I’d like to take a step back and talk about shooting the lava in a more traditional method: using a DSLR on the ground.

If you’re inside the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and can’t fly a drone, this is the only affordable way of shooting the surface flows. But even if a drone is an option, shooting from the ground is different and will give you unique opportunities and some challenges.

Shooting with a DSLR might be the least technically challenging way of shooting the lava in Kilauea, but it’s not as easy as you might think.

First of all, there’s the challenge of traversing the lava on foot. You’re basically walking on very hard, sometimes jagged terrain, and moving from point to point searching for compositions can be strenuous. As I’ve mentioned before, it’s a 7-8 km hike to get to the surface flow area, but there’s much more hiking on location to get the actual shots.

When shooting, you often want to get as close as possible to the lava, in order to get more detail and/or a desired perspective. This might be a problem in some cases, as the lava is about 1100 degrees Centigrade, and this temperature can be felt very well even from several meters away.

In some of the shots, I felt like I was inside an oven. I had to find my composition quickly, take a few images, and run away, since staying there would become unbearable after several seconds.

This particular shot has a slightly narrower depth of field than I’d like it to have. The → continue…

From:: DPreview

FEATURED AUDIO SOLUTION & TOOL: DXA-MICRO PRO

By Posted by Jody Michelle Solis, Editor

Beachtek DXA Micro Pro

Super Small, Super Performance

The Missing Link for your DSLR or Mirrorless Camera
Packed with features for pro audio

The BeachTek DXA-MICRO PRO is packed with all the features you need to record high quality audio from virtually any source. Superb operation and ease of use to make capturing pro audio a snap. Since the audio is recorded directly to the camera, it will always in sync with the video, eliminating the need for any post production processing. The compact size makes it ideal for use with the latest mirrorless cameras. The DXA-MICRO PRO is the missing link for connecting virtually any microphone to your camera. Learn more at www.beachtek.com/dxa-micro-pro.

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From:: Student Filmmakers

Best Camera Gear Of 2017

By wpadmin

2017 has been another year of great camera gear being released. For the first time ever I have decided to select MY favourites of the year. Tripod, drone, cinema lens, stills lens, DSLR, Mirrorless camera, video camera, 360 camera, microphone, lights, gimbal…I have chosen my favourites. To qualify they need to have been released this […]

The post Best Camera Gear Of 2017 appeared first on Philip Bloom- Blog.

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From:: Philip Bloom

Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best?

Intro

2017 has seen the release of some interesting cameras, but the two that have generated the most buzz, the most traffic and the most questions are Nikon’s D850 and the Sony a7R III. They’re both rather exotic creatures, not quite as other-worldly as D5s and a9s, but hardly the sorts of cameras we’re all going to rush out and buy. So why the excitement?

Both high res models are among the fastest in
their line-ups

What’s interesting about both is just how much better they are than their predecessors, despite superficially looking like subtle re-shuffles of the specifications. The give-away of this leap forward is hidden in plain sight: they may both be updates of their makers’ high-res models, but both are also promoted to being among the fastest-shooting models in their respective line-ups.

That makes them much more appealing, well-rounded cameras than their predecessors, which is perhaps why they’ve generated so much interest. And why everybody wants to know which is best…

It’s not about the mirror (or lack of it)

We ended our D850 review by calling it “the best DSLR on the market today” and summed up the Sony by saying it was “the most well-rounded mirrorless camera on the market,” but you should take that to mean it’s simply a question of whether you prefer a mirror in your camera or not. Mainly because, when you use them, it really doesn’t make much difference.

Closer to a sports camera than anything with 46 megapixels has the right to feel

Long gone are the days when you could say ‘DSLRs are better at autofocus’ or ‘Mirrorless are smaller, and more convenient.’ No-one who’s held a Sony a7 series with a GM lens on is likely to find the words ‘small’ → continue…

From:: DPreview

CIPA figures show disappointing October sales, but mirrorless continues to rise

Graph: CIPA

The Camera & Imaging Products Association (CIPA) has released its statistics for October 2017, and in contrast to previous years, we did not see the Black Friday/Thanksgiving induced spike we’re used to seeing, with month-to-month shipments remaining fairly flat (read: disappointing).

In fact, year-on-year total camera shipments in October are down a whopping 13 percent, although we did see an overall year-over-year increase of 11 percent in the digital camera market for the January-to-October timeframe, and 6 percent for ILCs. Part of this development could be due to production coming back online after the Kumamoto earthquake; however, this trend is likely to continue for another couple of CIPA reporting periods or so.

Compared to October 2016, only 78 percent of DSLRs were shipped globally, but 112 percent for mirrorless, indicating that mirrorless is continuing its rise while simultaneously cannibalizing market share from its DSLR cousins. Most of the mirrorless shipments are going to the Asia region, though, which still accounts for more than 50 percent of all mirrorless cameras shipped. Globally, mirrorless is now 36 percent of the total market for ILC.

With smartphones fulfilling most consumer imaging needs and a big manufacturer like Nikon thinking about re-entering the mirrorless segment, we’ll be watching closely to see how those numbers develop over the coming months into 2018.

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From:: DPreview

These are the best cameras you can buy right now

Best cameras you can buy right now

Suppose you’re the kind of person who reads movie spoilers online, or unwraps all of your presents on Christmas Eve. Does that make you a monster? Sure, but we’re not here to judge. You’d probably also like to know which are the very best cameras on the market right now without reading our meticulously prepared and exhaustively researched buying guides. That’s fine. You can cut right to the chase and find out which cameras we picked as category winners right here, you utter fiend.

Canon EOS M6

It’s light, offers a healthy dose of direct controls and includes Canon’s excellent Dual Pixel autofocus technology. It’s our pick for parents, but it’s a great option for someone who wants DSLR-like capabilities and controls in a compact package.

about the Canon EOS M6

Canon EOS M100

It’s an incarnation of the M6 with less direct control, but it’s also several hundred dollars cheaper. We think it’s an ideal lightweight point-and-shoot and it’s our top pick if you’re looking to spend around $500 on a new camera.

about the Canon EOS M100

Canon EOS Rebel SL2

Beginners looking for an unfussy DSLR to get started will feel right at home with the SL2. We think its Feature Assistant is useful, and it offers all of the same guts of the M6 in a more approachable form.

about the Canon SL2

Fujifilm X100F

You love it. We love it. Everyone loves the X100F. It’s truly the photography press’s darling, and it’s our pick in the fixed prime lens category thanks → continue…

From:: DPreview

CAMS unveils new camera plates for small DSLRs and mirrorless cameras

Following in the footsteps of its successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the Pro Camera plate system, accessory manufacturer CAMS is looking to the crowdfunding platform once more to create scaled down plates for smaller DSLR and CSC bodies. The company hopes to raise $20,000 to fund a project that it says brings a host of new features to the plate and sling strap system.

The new CAMS standard and Mini Plates are designed to fit smaller camera systems while still allowing access to the battery compartment door so batteries can be changed without having to remove the plate. The plates also have their own storage slots for a spare SD card and to hold the hex key that fits the plate to the camera.

Those using Arca-Swiss type tripod heads will be able to mount the plate directly onto their tripod, while a further thread in the base allows the plates to attach to a standard 1/4in-20 tripod screw.

Here’s a quick intro to the new plates from the Kickstarter campaign:

A sling strap comes as an optional accessory and connects to the plate via a quick-opening attachment, while a hand strap can be used with the smaller lug close to the camera’s handgrip. In addition to the usual neoprene strap, the company is now offering Minima webbing strap and a Pelle leather version.

Prices start from $50 for either plate with no strap or $65 with a Minima strap. For more details, visit the CAMS Kickstarter campaign page or the CAMS website.

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From:: DPreview

Firmware: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II v1.1.4

By Canon Rumors Canon has released new firmware for its flagship DSLR, the EOS-1D X Mark II. Firmware Version 1.1.4 incorporates the following improvements and fix: Support has been added for chromatic aberration correction, peripheral illumination correction, distortion correction, and Digital Lens Optimizer when using Digital Photo Professional to process RAW images captured with the following TS-E lenses: … → continue…

From:: Canon Rumors

Gear of the Year 2017 – Dan’s choice: Sony a9

It’s been fascinating to watch the rise of mirrorless cameras over the course of my 7+ years writing about digital photography. And Sony in particular has been fun to watch as they’ve lead the mirrorless charge in terms of sensor size and resolution.

I’ll never forget the moment the Sony NEX-7 was unveiled in a pre-launch briefing in 2011 – it was the first time I truly craved a mirrorless body – the publication I worked for at the time even named it ‘Camera of the Year‘. Up until that point mirrorless still felt like something of a novelty: a nice option for amateurs craving a small, light ILC alternative to a DSLR, but certainly not a replacement for one, especially for those ‘serious’ about their photography.

It’s often been Sony in particular making the mirrorless cameras I’m most eager to get my hands on.

As the mirrorless market continued to take off and cameras like the original Sony a7 were unveiled, my interest in what originally seemed like a niche continued to grow. And while a lot of brands have contributed serious innovation to the mirrorless market, it’s been Sony in particular making the mirrorless cameras I’m most eager to get my hands on – an opinion not shared by all my colleagues, mind you.

But time and time again I found my expectations of shooting a Sony mirrorless camera never quite matched the reality of using the product. For instance, when it came to the Sony a7, sure it packed a full-frame sensor in a super compact mirrorless body – something that’d never been done, but the user interface of the camera, to put it simply, felt unfinished. This led to an overly frustrating shooting experience.

<a target="_blank" href="http://www.dpreview.com/files/p/articles/1169671123/DSC00004.acrB.jpeg" → continue…

From:: DPreview

Gear of the Year 2017 – Barney’s choice (Part 2): Nikon D850

In the first part of this article, I wrote about the camera I’ve used most in 2017 – the Leica M10. In Part 2, I want to write about a camera that I’ve used very little. In fact, aside from bringing it to my eye and playing around with the reviewable sample that came into our office earlier this year, I’ve barely even managed to get my hands on it.

That camera is the Nikon D850. Undeniably one of the most important products of 2017 (and in terms of traffic, definitely among the most popular on DPReview) the D850 is an impressive DSLR by any measure.

The Nikon D810 is one of our favorite DSLRs of the past several years

It used to be the case that if you wanted high-resolution stills, you had to make do with a relatively slow camera. And conversely, if you wanted high-speed capture and ultra-long battery life, you had to drop $5000-6000 on a pro-grade camera that didn’t have the pixel-count required for really demanding applications. The Nikon D810 is one of our favorite DSLRs of the past several years, but its excellent resolution and unrivaled dynamic range at ISO 64 came at the expense of relatively slow continuous shooting, and (somewhat mysteriously) poor low-light autofocus performance compared to the flagship D5.

The D850’s wide dynamic range at its low ISO sensitivity settings enables shots like these (taken at ISO 125) which contain detail and true color everywhere from the deepest shadows to the highlight areas. Shot from a moving vehicle (hence the slightly softness at very close examination), this image is a great illustration of the D850’s versatility.

Photo by Carey Rose

On paper, the D850 offers the best of both worlds, and in practice, → continue…

From:: DPreview

Top 10 sample galleries of the year #1: the Nikon D850

As 2017 winds down, we’re counting down our top 10 most popular sample galleries of the year. Finally, we’ve made it to the top spot. With images viewed nearly 3 million times and counting, by far our most popular gallery of the year belongs to the Nikon D850.

This is another gold award winning product and staff favorite. DPR staffer Carey Rose feels strongly that it ‘could be the only DSLR you’ll ever need,‘ and a quick peek through our sample gallery should prove why. After all, it’s got 45.7MP of resolution, a capable autofocus system, fast burst shooting and offers great image quality under almost any situation.

That’s it for 2017, see our full list of top galleries below. And happy shooting!


Top 10 most popular sample galleries of 2017:

#10: Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art
#9: Fujifilm GFX 50S
#8: Nikon D7500
#7: Olympus Tough TG-5
#6: Sigma 85mm F1.4
#5: Fujifilm X-T20
#4: Leica M10
#3: Fujifilm X100F
#2: Sony Alpha a9
#1: Nikon D850

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From:: DPreview

What You Need To Know About the GoPro Fusion 360 Camera

By Al Caudullo

Gearbest promotion

So first of all, of course, you’ve got the camera which we’re going to go over in detail.

You also have a case.

And the case is kind of a clamshell affair.

It covers it up very nicely protection lenses always keep this case with you really do need it.

Of course, you do get a GoPro battery in this is a little bit different from the GoPro batteries I’ve seen before.

And they give you a couple of adhesive mounts one is a curved mount.

And one is a flat mount.

Then, you get this very cool extension pole, and monopod, tripod, what everyone a call it. Here’s what’s so cool about it.

It opens up like so.

Then with a quick twist and twist back.

You got a nice little extension.

Now it’s a little bit too short, so you’re probably going to need something like one of my Sirui Monopod, I would suggest any way, one of my Sirui Monopods.

But you can get by with this, and it works very well.

Of course, for the Fusion. Now one thing I do recommend this side slides down, and this is your battery. Notice that the battery has labels and arrows for SD Card 1 and SD Card 2.

And this is also where your micro SD cards go.

You do need to have them set for Front and Back, and they need to stay in the same position. Now back is considered where you can see the LCD display because you want to keep that facing you just like you would call back the back of the camera with say a DSLR.

So let’s go ahead and put that in, and then the other one should be labeled “F,” or “1”, whichever way you guys want to do it, but I like to use F and B.

And of course but the battery and in one of the first things that you should make sure that you do.

Is to go and download the newest firmware and update your fusion as soon as you get it.

A couple of other things, I’ll show you here’s the mode switch which is also your on and off.

And here as you open this up you have your USB connection here and this is a USB-C. type connector that also comes with it.

Now, I’m going to turn this on, and I’m going to show you right now how the Firmware boots up but we’re not going to go through the whole process because it does take a few minutes. Load the firmware on to the BACK micros SD card only. Then you press and hold the mode button to turn on the Fusion.

And there goes notice it says 1/2.

And what it’s doing right now is it updating the firmware.

And it’s going to go for a little while. And then it will change to ‘2/2” and continue going and then when it’s all done it’ll reset itself. If you do have any problems, you may have to reset your Fusion, but I don’t think that that’s going to come up I hadn’t seen it come up very much. Be sure that your battery is full when you start the firmware upgrade.

And we’re going to take a pause right here, and we’ll come back as soon as this is done and then also I’ll be going over the features of the camera.

It’s going to 2/2 now.

And it’s already flashed off, and it’s going to reset itself.

We get a check when it is completed.

It turns off again it’s going to turn on and off a few times until it gets finished.

And then once it gets finished it’ll let you know, by going to the default mode which is Video. And there we go we are now ready to go ahead and shoot again.

And we’re all set. We have just upgraded the firmware to the GoPro Fusion.

Stay tuned in to 360VRVoice for more videos, tutorials and more about the GoPro Fusion.

And please join

This is Al CAudullo with the 360VRVoice, and I am very happy to say that GoPro has started shipping the GoPro Fusion and I want to show you right now what it is that you get exactly when it comes then?

So first of all, of course, you’ve got the camera which we’re going to go over in detail.

You also have a case.

And the case is kind of a clamshell affair.

It covers it up very nicely protection lenses always keep this case with you really do need it.

Of course, you do get a GoPro battery in this is a little bit different from the GoPro batteries I’ve seen before.

And they give you a couple of adhesive mounts one is a curved mount.

And one is a flat mount.

Then, you get this very cool extension pole, and monopod, tripod, what everyone a call it. Here’s what’s so cool about it.

It opens up like so.

Then with a quick twist and twist back.

You got a nice little extension.

Now it’s a little bit too short, so you’re probably going to need something like one of my Sirui Monopod, I would suggest any way, one of my Sirui Monopods.

But you can get by with this, and it works very well.

Of course, for the Fusion. Now one thing I do recommend this side slides down, and this is your battery. Notice that the battery has labels and arrows for SD Card 1 and SD Card 2.

And this is also where your micro SD cards go.

You → continue…

From:: Student Filmmakers

“Goodbye Neck Pain!” With The Yoshimi Camera Neck Strap

By Jakub Han

camera neck strap with backpack grip

Have you had neck pain from carrying around DSLR’s and mirrorless cameras? The improved camera neck strap by Yoshimi Camera caught our attention at Inter BEE 2017. It redistributes your camera’s weight and puts an end to sore necks!

At Inter BEE 2017 in Japan we found Hitotsuki-San, the man behind Yoshimi Camera Co. LTD. The company invented an improved camera neck strap. The idea behind their product is to attach the strap to a backpack and therefore redistribute the weight of the camera from neck to shoulders. They made this possible by adding a piece of leather to the traditional design of a camera neck strap, that attaches to a backpack’s top handle. Obviously you will have to wear a backpack to make this work.

Even though this product mainly aims at photographers, in certain situations some filmmakers tend to wear neck straps too. This is especially true for run and gun filmmaking and documentary style reporting, when the extra weight of a rig or other camera stabilizers are not welcome. Some people also use neck straps for extra stabilized handheld shots.

Camera neck strap with a twist by Yoshimi Camera

Having to have a backpack to make this work may seem like a limitation. I have to admit though, that when I do reports or run and gun action, I often find myself wearing a small backpack that has some spare memory cards, batteries and lenses in it.

The special camera neck strap by Yoshimi Camera comes in two versions:

  1. Standard camera strap is available in four colours (orange, red, light blue and navy blue) and costs around $50,-.
  2. Leather camera strap is black only and costs around $90,-.

The straps can be ordered directly from the Yoshimi Camera website (Note that the page is not in english).

Do you think this is a good → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

Canon illuminated buttons patent hints at future prosumer DSLR design

Canon has filed a patent that shows illuminated buttons appearing on the back of a prosumer DSLR camera, hinting that the feature may be added to the maker’s future models. Details are sparse at this time, but an illustration in the patent shows a series of buttons with what appears to be a row of LEDs behind them.

The patent explains that the technology “enables a letter or character on the surface of a button to emit light uniformly.”

As with all patents, we can’t say for sure when (or even if) this feature will make its way into a Canon camera, but it seems like a no-brainer and something that would be simple to implement. Check out the full patent for yourself here.

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From:: DPreview

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