DIY

Squeeze Your Quasars With This One Cool Trick

By Matthew Jeppsen – DP Notes

Lighting dimmers. Everyone needs a few in their kit. You can buy ’em pre-made and robust, or you can DIY them if you are handy. There are even mini in-line dimmers for use in practical fixtures (no cord!). But my favorite solution by far is the lowly Harbor Freight Router Speed Control. At just $20 from your local cheap tool supply, this thing is a no-brainer.

For starters, it’s got an on/off switch. This is very handy for lights that have no power switch, like the incredible Source Four leko, or those fancy new Quasar Science LED tubes that the kids are talking about. The other side of the power switch is a variable dimmer setting, which gives you between roughly 20%-100% of dimming control. It’ll handle up to 1000w, is rated for 15 amps, and has a fuse in case you screw up.


The only real downside that I have found is that when dimming it emits a small buzzing noise under high load (when dimming lights over 650 watts or so). I hear a slight buzz when dimming 750w lekos, and it’s a little louder with 1000w heads. The buzz level at 750w is not at all objectionable for sound recording as long as you’re not right on top of the mic with it…to be honest, most rooms are louder than the noise it emits under load.

So pick up a few of these for your kit. And if you buy this weekend, use one of the Harbor Freight discount codes below to save a few bucks.

20% off one item 5/27-5/28 – 88740979
25% off one item 5/29 – 88740589

The post Squeeze Your Quasars With This One Cool Trick appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

→ continue…

From:: Pro Video Coalition

Watch: Learn How to Make Your Own Creative Bokeh Backdrop

By V Renée

Creating a stunning backdrop for your project doesn’t require a heap of dough (or a whole lot of work, for that matter).

If you’re looking for a cool idea that’ll make your next film or music video a little more stylish, you might want to think about designing your own backdrop. However, if you really want to kick it up a notch, you could turn said backdrop into a modifier to produce some creative lighting effects. In this DIY tutorial, Ukrainian photographer Anya Anti shows you how to design your own custom cookie backdrops that will allow you to create some beautiful bokeh effects. Check it out below:

Even though Anti’s DIY modifier is intended to be used for photography, it’d work just as well for filmmaking. The build is extremely simple—if you did any kind of art project in elementary school, you can do this—and best of all, it’s super cheap. All you need is:

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Photo Gear News shows you how to make a DIY lapel mic

Professional microphones for video are expensive, and even if you have the means, some cameras don’t offer the correct inputs. In this video, for Photo Gear News, Daniel Peters shows you how to make a DIY lapel microphone using a smartphone and a pair of earbuds.

Check out PGN’s YouTube channel for more

→ continue…

From:: DPreview

Small Cine-Rovers for creative POV video: Part 1

By Jeff Foster

What first started out as a fascination with ground based POV cam rovers, cars and trucks, I’ve seen a lot of expensive development going into this lately, so I decided to venture into what it takes to build a functional DIY rover that can be used in various locations and production purposes.

Ground based systems that may look like simple RC toys (which at their heart, really are) have a function that neither aerial nor handheld operation can achieve. Getting into locations inaccessible or possibly dangerous by other means, is probably the number one reason to build a system like this. Agriculture, wildlife, conservation, geological studies and many other industries have need for an economical entry into this technology.

RC Rover with DJI OSMO mounted scaling rocks

The purpose of my particular concept was to find a lightweight and very flexible rover platform that could be used in various types of video production that I might encounter with corporate and governmental agencies as my clients. Getting good POV footage is always a challenge and seeing the world from different and compelling angles always keeps your production interesting. It’s also good to explore various ways to get you cameras into locations that might offer closer details or discovery after the fact from a mission.

So this is only Part 1 of what I hope to be a multi-part exploration of this conceptual endeavor. With the help from the folks at Multicopter Warehouse that provided all the camera gear and support, I also hoped to expand on this basic concept with more automation in the near future from the help of my engineer friends who used to work at 3D Robotics to build an ultimate Ardu Rover with autonomous control and more advanced electronics and automation.

Step 1: Selecting the right rover base

I did → continue…

From:: Pro Video Coalition

10 cool DIY photography techniques that anyone can do

Are you in a creative rut? Do you need some ideas to break out and do something different? This short video by COOPH highlights ten cool photography techniques that anybody can do.
Do you have a favorite DIY technique that’s not in the video? Share it with us!

→ continue…

From:: DPreview

Learn How to Build Your Own $45 Light Wand That Can Change Colors

By V Renée

If you’ve got $45 and a little time on your hands, you can make your own DIY color-changing, Wi-Fi enabled light wand.

Light wands are great for a lot of reasons. They’re lightweight, portable, and come in handy when you need to add a little extra light without a whole lot of fuss. However, units like the Westcott Ice Light are crazy expensive at $500, so many indie filmmakers aren’t able to take advantage of their great dexterity—unless, of course, you’re up for a little DIY project. With just $45 worth of materials, this tutorial from Macroscope Pictures shows you how to build your own light wand that has all the features you’d hope to see in a conventional unit, including the ability to change colors and Wi-Fi capability.

Yes, this is a bit more labor intensive than many of the tutorials we share here, but the result is worth it. Check out the material list courtesy of DIY Photography:

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Watch: Learn How to Make a DIY Softbox out of an Old Bike Wheel

By V Renée

Got an old bike lying around collecting dust? Turn it into a super cheap lighting solution.

I bought a bike about a month ago thinking it’d be the perfect way for me to get in shape after my winter hibernation. I’ve ridden it exactly one time. Honestly, we all probably have a bike that has become a luxury condominium for spiders and dust bunnies, which is why this DIY tutorial is so perfect if you’re looking for a cheap way to get your hands on a new lighting solution. Creator Rob Thomas of Prickly Sauce has come up with an awesome way to turn an old bike wheel, a bit of lycra fabric, and an LED strip into a dirt cheap DIY softbox. Check it out below:

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Rooftop Films Summer 2017 Lineup Features Ana Lily Amirpour, Michael Showalter, Jessica Williams, and More Indie Faves

By Liz Nord

A summer visit to New York City isn’t complete without a Rooftop Films outdoor screening.

What began 21 years ago as a scrappy, DIY way for some friends to catch underground movies while taking advantage of New York’s copious rooftops has turned into the city’s biggest movie party and the best way to see the films that you heard about from the year’s festival circuit. The best part is that the Rooftop Films screening series stretches all summer long, running from May 19th to August 19th, with more than 45 outdoor screenings in more than 10 unique venues, most featuring parties, live music, or other special guests and performances.

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Sundance Announces New Creative Distribution Fellowship with Columbus, Unrest

By Scott Macaulay

The Sundance Institute announced today a new initiative aimed at filmmakers going the DIY distribution route. The inaugural projects supported by the Creative Distribution Fellowship are two recommended independent films that premiered this past January at Sundance: Columbus, by Filmmaker 25 New Face :: kogonada, and Unrest, a documentary by director and subject Jennifer Brea. In the press release, Keri Putnam, Executive Director of Sundance Institute, said, “Columbus and Unrest are perfect examples of the creative spirit of independent filmmaking, and this new Fellowship will provide them with resources, mentorship and tactical support to pioneer independent pathways to audiences. This […] → continue…

From:: Filmmaker Magazine

5 DIY Tips for Your Next Shoot

By Logan Baker Here are 5 ways to boost the production value of your video shots on a DIY budget. → continue…

From:: Premium Beat

Michal Marczak Built a DIY Gimbal Backpack Rig and Practical Lights to Make the Camera Come Alive

By Emily Buder

To shoot docu-fiction hybrid ‘All These Sleepless Nights,’ DIY master Michal Marczak built a custom rig, used practical lights, and recorded all of his dialogue in ADR.

What does adolescence feel like? I think of a time when the world was at once too small and too big—constrictive in its physical size, but nearly paralyzing in its existential questions. A time when time itself seemed endless, provoking both impulsivity and utter boredom. A time when emotions were unnavigable, like a hedge maze of thorns designed specifically to trap you and only you. A time when the simplest of life’s pleasures—a good song, a first kiss, the first light of dawn—felt immeasurable in their beauty.

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

CROZ DIY camera offers just the basics in a tiny clear case

CROZ, a small DIY camera that first appeared on Kickstarter in October 2016, is now available for purchase. This camera is shipped as a do-it-yourself kit that requires buyers to assemble the device. The resulting camera, once fully assembled, is quite small and features a clear case that makes the internal components visible. The CROZ camera was developed by Taiwanese company Paper Shoot and designed by Hyle Design.

CROZ is a digital camera, though it lacks a display for previewing and reviewing photos. The camera features a 5MP CMOS sensor, LARGAN Precision Lens, four photo filters (B&W, Color, Sepia, and Blue), a microUSB connection port, and ‘automatic image algorithms.’ The entire camera, including the two AAA batteries that power it, weighs 98g / 3.4oz and measures in at 12mm / 0.45in thick.

Photos are stored to an SD card (up to 32GB capacity supported). Users can swap out the lenses based on need, as well; the kit ships with a wide-angle lens and a fisheye lens. Paper Shoot, which is offering the kit for $3,899 NT / $129 USD / £100 GBP, explains, “CROZ is designed to be simple and straight forward – it is a digital camera, period.”

Via: PetaPixel

→ continue…

From:: DPreview