David Fincher

Watch: Cracking the Code of How David Fincher Moves the Camera to Build Characters

By Max Winter

Once you see the world through Fincher’s eyes, you may have trouble seeing it any other way.

Who’s to say where, in the creation of an artistic work, the work comes in? In film, we find that some filmmakers work very hard at plotting, creating vast architectures that are miraculous in their completion (think Spielberg, Lucas, Lumet, Hitchcock). Some invest incredible energy in visual detail, creating sumptuous, sensory feasts that stick in our memories more than any twist or turn of their story (think Malick, Kubrick).

Others, however, seem to be polymaths, perpetually working in all directions, making films that deserve examination for any number of reasons because they operate on so many different levels. David Fincher is one of those. Say what you will about Fincher’s films, they bear the weight of repeated conversations and speculations on points both minute and grand.

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From:: No Film School

Why David Fincher’s ‘Mindhunter’ DP Believes ‘There Are No Rules’ in Lighting

By Hawkins DuBois

‘Mindhunter’ DP Erik Messerschmidt shot the darkly intimate show with custom-made RED Xenomorphs.

When it comes to cinematography, every filmmaker, every movie or show, and every shot is different. While there may be a “textbook” way to approach a scene, there is no “correct” way. Even so, patterns and styles always emerge, and few filmmakers have developed a look as distinctive as David Fincher’s. While Fincher is best known for his mysterious and gritty films, ranging from Fight Club to The Social Network, he’s recently ventured into the realm of streaming television, where he has produced and directed the critically-acclaimed House of Cards, and now seeks to expand on that success with the recently-released Mindhunter for Netflix.

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From:: No Film School

NYFF 2017: Mindhunter (Episodes 1-2), Good Streamable Chronological Narrative Content

By Vadim Rizov

The first two episodes of Netflix’s Mindhunter, directed by David Fincher, are slightly stylistically diluted but still distinctively his. Fincher also directed the last two episodes of the ten-episode first season, which has already been renewed for a second prior to dropping this Friday — whether I make it to his bookending episodes I have no idea, but fans should at least take a look at this starting point. “Peak TV,” or at least the limited-run series, has increasingly accommodated one director who wants to do it all: this year has seen airings of Paolo Sorrentino’s The Young Pope, Jean-Marc Vallée’s Big Little […] → continue…

From:: Filmmaker Magazine

3 Ways David Fincher Uses Color to Completely Mess with Your Head

By V Renée

The color palettes David Fincher uses in his films are just as powerful as his dark, unstable characters.

There are a lot of words to describe David Fincher’s films but “subtle” isn’t really one of them. The worlds he creates have a characteristic normalcy, albeit dark and slightly off, but as their stories progress we’re always brought to the nightmarish carnival that is Fincher’s creativity—peeking past the curtain to see a fight club, a missing woman stabbing a man to death mid-coitus, and a mummified man barely alive laying in a room full of pine tree air fresheners.

However, there are areas in which Fincher uses some restraint and finesse in order to carefully lay the groundwork for his more over-the-top sequences, one of which is color. In this video essay by StudioBinder, we get to see how the director employs different color palettes to communicate important themes and character traits to his audience, as well as to ramp up the anticipation in suspenseful scenes.

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From:: No Film School