Best Cinematography

One week to go for the nominees

By tonycosta100@gmail.com (Tony Costa)

One week to go for the nominees

The jury is now working really hard watching and evaluating the 51 features, 18 documentaries and 18 TV drama episodes representing 36 societies that have submitted films for the IMAGO INTERNATIONAL AWARDS FOR CINEMATOGRAPHY. The nominees will be announced if no “raison de force» on Sunday October 8th . Three films for each of these categories will be part of the nomination.

▪ Best Cinematography for a Feature Film
▪ Best Cinematography for a Television Drama
▪ Best Cinematography for a Documentary Film

The Gala Awards ceremony to be held on Saturday, 28th October 2017 at Hanasaari – The Swedish-Finnish Cultural Centre in Helsinki, Finland. During the evening the winners will be announced along with 4 additional awards; The IMAGO Young Cinematographer of the Year supported by ARRI, along with the IMAGO Lifetime Achievement Award; IMAGO Extraordinary Contribution to the Art of Cinematography and finally the IMAGO Technical Achievement Award.

The Gala Awards presentation will be a great moment to recognise the Art of Cinematography and cinematographers. These represent in essence Awards from cinematographers to cinematographers, something we are all looking forward to with great enthusiasm. We encourage you to join us in Helsinki for these Awards which represent the very best of the best in the field of Cinematography, from around the globe.

The IMAGO Board and the Awards organising committee would like to thank and congratulate all our member Societies for their support by collecting the films and the respective permissions in order to guarantee the success of these IMAGO Awards for Cinematography.

We also take this opportunity to thank our Awards sponsors for their generosity and their overwhelming support, without them these Awards would not be possible.

The Awards Committee would like to thank the work done by the list of jurors below.

The juries

FEATURE FILM AWARD

Esa Vourinen FSC
Sunny Joseph ISC
Alex Linden FSF
Christian Berger AAC
Bogdan Verzhbitsky → continue…

From:: Imago News

All 17 Oscar Best Cinematography Winners of the 21st Century Ranked from Worst to Best

By David Zou

Cinematography is the aspect of filmmaking most unique to the medium. The camera has a relation to the spectator as well as what is being filmed; it’s the bare bones of the genuine language of cinema.

The Academy Awards have honored films of beauty that deserved a golden statue in our millennia, while, as with any category or any given Oscar year, several injustices have been made. This list hopes to separate those films with timeless appeal from works of only a momentary impression.

17. Slumdog Millionaire

Caught between the handheld grain of a Paul Greengrass Bourne movie or the saturated sheen of a J J Abrams joint, Slumdog Millionaire attempts to express the rags to riches tale of an Indian boy, filtered by Englishman Danny Boyle to please the minimal integrity of the undiscerning American masses cloying for sentiment of just this variety.

The Best Picture winner of 2008 appeals to means of visual and narrative crowd-pleasing rather than providing a genuine slice of life perspective on poverty in India or any kind of Bollywood homage or revival.

Dutch angles, vibrant colors and kinetic, momentous energy only go so far in Slumdog, and it’s easily the least noteworthy of any film from any film walking away with Best Cinematography in the 21st century. With eight total Oscars wins, Slumdog Millionaire capitalized on a generally weak year, but for the category in question, the film somehow beat The Dark Knight.

16. Avatar

Single-handedly sending 3D back to the forefront of Hollywood moviemaking, Avatar was a critical and commercial phenomenon that would, if nothing else, earn James Cameron respect for his talents as a director of unmatched technical ambitions.

However, Cameron’s first (of many more to come eventually and unfortunately) trek into Pandora doesn’t successfully inhabit a world, though → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema