Australia

Behind the scenes: Trapped in a blizzard with the Fujifilm GFX 50s

Photographer Josselin Cornou recently got his hands on a Kipon EF-GFX adapter and Tamron 15-30mm F2.8 lens, which he couldn’t wait to slap onto his Fujifilm GFX-50S. But what to shoot? So he hopped into a car and headed up to Thredbo in the Snowy Mountains of Australia… with a $6,500 camera… what the worst that could happen!?

Cue Murphy’s law.

As fate would have it, Josselin and his expensive new gear got caught in an extreme blizzard—an experience that seems to have both terrified and delighted him, if you go by his squeals of joy in the video. Fortunately for us, it gave him a chance to test out all three of his new toys (the Fuji GFX, Kipon Adaptor, and Tamron 15-30mm F2.8) in some of the harshest conditions you might ever dream of taking them.

You can hear what he had to say in the video up top, but he was also kind enough to share some more thoughts with DPReview readers in writing. So, here goes. Take it away Josselin:


About the Kipon Adaptor

Pros: the adapter allows you to change the aperture of the lens from the GFX.

Cons: there is no connection to the camera.

Ultimately, I found this to be a great tool to use any EF lens on the Fujifilm GFX. There is no weather sealing on the current version, so I had to remove the adaptor when it was drying. Still, it did a really great job in incredibly tough conditions, and it’s still fully functional even after freezing solid!

Having an adaptor with aperture control is a must if you want to use Canon glasses on the GFX.

About the Tamron 15-30mm → continue…

From:: DPreview

AI-powered ‘Google Lens’ is being integrated into Assistant on Pixel phones

With the Pixel 2 smartphone, Google introduced an exciting new software feature called Google Lens. Google Lens uses Artificial Intelligence to power its visual recognition algorithms and provides information about whatever your smartphone’s camera is pointed at—for example, what type of flower you are looking at or reviews and other information about a restaurant. You can also identify landmarks, look up movies, books or works of art and scan barcodes/QR codes and business cards.

Unfortunately, in its first implementation the feature wasn’t terribly easy or straightforward to use. You had to take a picture, then go to Google Photos and tap the Lens icon which would trigger the Google Lens scan. That’s too many steps to make the feature as useful as it could potentially be.

Thankfully, Lens will be integrated into Google Assistant soon. When you open the latter, there’ll now be a Lens icon near the bottom right of the display. Tapping this opens up a Google Lens camera. You can tap on any object of interest in the preview window and the app will provide any available information.

As usual, the new feature will be rolled out gradually. English-language Pixel phones that are using Assistant in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, India, and Singapore will be served first over the coming weeks, but we’d expect the new feature to make it other regions soon after.

→ continue…

From:: DPreview

Facebook just doubled the resolution of photos in Facebook Messenger

Photo messaging has been around for a long time, but as smartphone cameras get better and better, this form of ‘visual communication’ is only becoming more common. That’s why, earlier today, Facebook announced a major update to Facebook Messenger that doubles the resolution of the photos you send from 2K to 4K—or, more specifically, to a max of 4096 x 4096 pixels.

“We heard that people want to send and receive high resolution photos in Messenger,” reads the release from Facebook, “and considering people send more than 17 billion photos through Messenger every month, we’re making your conversations richer, sharper, and better than ever.”

And just in case you’re wondering: this resolution bump should not affect speed. According to Facebook, “your photos will also be sent just as quickly before, even at this new, higher resolution.”

Here are a few before and after samples that show what doubling the resolution from the previous 2K looks like IRL.

*The images on the left were reproduced to reflect the previous default resolution at 2K. The images on the right reflect the new default resolution at 4K

To take advantage of the new feature yourself, update your FB Messenger app to the latest version and every photo you send should automatically send at up to 4096 x 4096 pixels.

For now, the feature is limited to iPhone and Android users in the US, Canada, France, Australia, the UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea. Additional countries will be added in the ‘coming weeks.’

Press Release

Making Visual Messaging Even Better – Introducing High Resolution Photos in Messenger

By Sean Kelly & Hagen Green, Product Managers, Messenger

The way people message today is no longer limited by just text; visual messaging as our new universal language is much more emotional and expressive. Whether you’re catching → continue…

From:: DPreview