Alfonso Cuar

In the Age of ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ it’s Time to Revisit ‘Children of Men’

By Justin Morrow

Like ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ the dystopia of predecessor ‘Children of Men’ is of the moment.

With the recent success ofThe Handmaid’s Tale, perhaps there’s no better time to revisit one of the finest dystopian worlds ever realized on film, Alfonso Cuarón’s 2006 masterpiece, Children of Men.

Like the recent adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 The Handmaid’s Tale, Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men, from 2006, is also based on a novel about dystopian futures without new life. Both films focus on fertility, or, rather, its lack. It’s fascinating that infertility (caused by some unknown environmental disaster) was an element of Atwood’s 1980s, novel as well as James’ book, published in 1993, which goes to show that the clouds have been rolling for some time now, and that there is a relationship between all of these works based on a terrifying, but very possible, vision of the near future.

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Watch: Hollywood’s Greatest Trick is Not What You’d Expect

By Emily Buder

Hollywood is throwing its most dedicated workers under the bus.

Invisibility has long been the characteristic of great visual effects. Being unseen is something to strive for; the less you notice the strings, the better the puppet show. But being invisible has taken its toll on VFX artists, turning them into veritable puppets of their own.

As a revealing new video essay from Sohail Al-Jamea details, being a VFX artist—even an Oscar-winning one—is a “swim to the bottom” in today’s entertainment landscape. Hollywood jobs are being increasingly outsourced overseas, leaving Los Angeles VFX companies to underbid for local jobs, while employees go without retirement funds, benefits, or health insurance.

Scott Ross, former VFX executive at ILM, points out in the video that 80% of Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity is animated. It’s not the performances that made Gravity so affecting; it’s the cinematic experience. And that was created by VFX artists. Meanwhile, Sandra Bullock made $62 million on the film, while Framestore, the visual effects company behind Gravity, “does not make money.”

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School

Watch: A Visual Love Letter to 3-Time Oscar Winner Emmanuel Lubezki

By Emily Buder

Emmanuel Lubezki, known fondly as ‘Chivo,’ is one of the greatest living cinematographers.

Emmanuel Lubezki is a living legend. His work as a cinematographer on Gravity, Birdman, and The Revenant has earned him an Academy Award for three consecutive years; he was nominated five times before that. In his collaborations with directors such as Terrence Malick, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Mike Nichols, and Joel and Ethan Coen, Lubezski has pushed the boundaries of the camera’s eye, taking us to apocalyptic futures, the most remote corners of the uninhabitable wilderness, and the far reaches of outer space.

Though widely known and revered for his realism and natural lighting, Chivo, as Lubezki is affectionately termed, infuses his images with a poetry and majesty rarely witnessed by mortal beings. When he shoots light as it flows through the branches of trees, it’s as if he’s summoning the power of the earth in his frame.

Read More

→ continue…

From:: No Film School