Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger: How to Create an Efficient Editing Workflow

By V Renée

Ah yes, the sexiest topic in film production: workflow.

If you don’t have a streamlined post workflow, you can kiss efficiency and your sanity goodbye. Seriously, one of the best ways to make your life easier in post-production is by maintaining a well-organized workflow, one that not only allows you to work faster but one that also allows you to work smarter so you’re not losing great shots and perfect takes in the chaos of post. In this video, Matti Haapoja of TravelFeels shares some insight on how to create and maintain an effective editing workflow by walking you through his process from start to finish.

Haapoja shared a lot of great tips in the video, but here are a few takeaways for you to let marinate.

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From:: No Film School

The 10 Best Haunted House Movies of All Time

By David Zou

Evil ghosts and supernatural beings can be really scary, even more so if they are wrecking havoc in your home. Keeping you up at night, destroying your possessions, and trying to kill you, a vengeful ghost can prove to be not fun company in your house.

Over the years, there are countless horror movies that have people battling entities in their home. Many of these movies have stood the test of time and proved to be the best of the best. Here are the 10 best haunted house movies.

10. The Legend of Hell House (1973)

The Legend of Hell House

The Legend of Hell House is a wild ride of a film that has it all: evil spirits, sex, gore, and a possessed cat. The movie opens with Rudolph Deutsch (Roland Culver), an elderly millionaire hiring Doctor Lionel Barrett (Clive Revill) to investigate the Belasco House for signs of any afterlife. Deustch is obsessed with finding out if there’s life after death and wants Barrett to prove it.

Barrett is given one week to provide proof or disapprove Deutsch’s theory and receive a substantial amount of money. Barrett gathers his team including psychic medium Florence Tanner (Pamela Franklin) and sets off for Belasco house. When the group arrive, things start to instantly get weird as Tanner begins to experience physical manifestations. Barrett is even attacked by something he can’t see and blames Tanner for his injuries.

Barrett’s wife also begins to experience symptoms such as erotic dreams which has her demanding sex from another member in the group. Tanner believes that one of the spirits in the house is Belasco’s son and sets out to prove it. She finds the bones of skeleton chained to a wall and buries it outside of → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

15 Essential Camera Shots All Filmmakers Should Know

By V Renée

From camera angle to shot size, this video breaks down the basics of placement and orientation.

Even if you’re new to filmmaking, chances are you know quite a bit about how to set up a shot. You’ve seen enough movies to know that shots come in different sizes and angles, that some have motion while others don’t, but if you want to get your feet firmly planted on a strong cinematic foundation, you might want to check out this video. In it, Sareesh Sudhakaran of wolfcrow talks about fifteen of the most widely-used camera shots, which includes the many different kinds of angles, sizes, and camera movements.

This is composition 101. Before you start thinking about all of those cool camera moves, like whip pans, long takes, and upside-down tracking shots, you have to get familiar with the basics. Sudhakaran conveniently groups each camera shot into three different categories: camera angle, shot size, and camera movement.

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From:: No Film School

10 Great Oscar Nominations No One Talks About

By Anmol Titoria

being-there

For most film audiences around the globe, the Oscars have been a reliable standard of cinematic quality and analyzing the winners and nominees from the past few ceremonies, it is evident they will remain that way for a long time to come.

The prestige and the inherent glamour of the Oscars, heightened by the parties and the red carpets and the ludicrously blatant propagation of celebrity culture that is the direct result of such proceedings, have made the access of the Oscars far higher in magnitude than other cinematic honors, including the prestigious Cannes Film Festival prize, the Palme d’Or.

But for far too long, and far too often the Oscars have been content with rewarding the popular and the universally well-liked, not only reducing the range of cinema that gets the opportunity of being listed by the Academy as the year’s best, but also ensuring that convention and alarmingly often, mediocrity gets to stand out more than experimental, groundbreaking cinema.

And when all the parading and the orchestrated exposition is done with, mainstream audiences forget the films honored and devout film enthusiasts are glad to see the hoopla around the lesser films and work honored by the Oscars die down, if they even cared for it all in the first place.

But how do the Oscars manage to maintain that long-standing reputation? How do they manage to stay in the conversation years after a particular ceremony, with people holding grudges and celebrating certain victories?

It is because once in a while the Oscars will switch gears and award something akin to “Moonlight”, a coming-of-age story centered on a gay man over something like “La La Land” a traditional musical that became one of the most nominated movies in Academy history, or giving a writing nod to something as dialogue-free as “2001: → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

10 Great Oscar Nominations No One Talk About

By Anmol Titoria

being-there

For most film audiences around the globe, the Oscars have been a reliable standard of cinematic quality and analyzing the winners and nominees from the past few ceremonies, it is evident they will remain that way for a long time to come.

The prestige and the inherent glamour of the Oscars, heightened by the parties and the red carpets and the ludicrously blatant propagation of celebrity culture that is the direct result of such proceedings, have made the access of the Oscars far higher in magnitude than other cinematic honors, including the prestigious Cannes Film Festival prize, the Palme d’Or.

But for far too long, and far too often the Oscars have been content with rewarding the popular and the universally well-liked, not only reducing the range of cinema that gets the opportunity of being listed by the Academy as the year’s best, but also ensuring that convention and alarmingly often, mediocrity gets to stand out more than experimental, groundbreaking cinema.

And when all the parading and the orchestrated exposition is done with, mainstream audiences forget the films honored and devout film enthusiasts are glad to see the hoopla around the lesser films and work honored by the Oscars die down, if they even cared for it all in the first place.

But how do the Oscars manage to maintain that long-standing reputation? How do they manage to stay in the conversation years after a particular ceremony, with people holding grudges and celebrating certain victories?

It is because once in a while the Oscars will switch gears and award something akin to “Moonlight”, a coming-of-age story centered on a gay man over something like “La La Land” a traditional musical that became one of the most nominated movies in Academy history, or giving a writing nod to something as dialogue-free as “2001: → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Melosity enables fluid creative collaboration between musicians

By noreply@redsharknews.com (Kevin Bourke)

An innovative new way for musicians to collaborate

RedShark Review: While collaborative workflows for video have received a lot of attention in recent years, musicians have not had the same attention paid to their needs. Until now.

  • collaboration
  • Music
  • Music production
  • music sharing

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    From:: RedShark News

    The Art Directors Guild’s Gallery 800 Presents A Special 11th Anniversary Exhibit of “Art Unites”

    By Admin

    LOS ANGELES

    The Art Directors Guild (ADG, IATSE Local 800) Gallery 800 presents a special 11th anniversary exhibition of Art Unites 11, a dynamic mix of diverse…

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    From:: Shoot OnLine

    Cutters Studios’ Altruistic “Project For Good” Delivers First Initiative, For Chicago Non-Profit Bootstrap Villages

    By DWAgency

    CHICAGO, DETROIT, LOS ANGELES, NEW YORK and TOKYO

    Over the past 37 years, commercial editorial company Cutters has expanded its core skillset to include world-class live-action production (Dictionary Films), design, animation and visual effects (Flavor), interactive development (Picnic Media) and audio mixing (Another Country). Beyond its…

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    From:: Shoot OnLine

    Photo of GoPro Hero6 leaked, will be able to shoot 4K at 60fps

    We’ve already knew the GoPro Hero6 was on the way thanks to company CEO Nick Woodman, who revealed the camera’s existence back in February. But a newly leaked photo of the Hero6 reveals one very exciting feature we didn’t know about: the little camera will allegedly be able to shoot 4K at 60fps.

    The leaked photo was sent to Photo Rumors by a reader of theirs, and as with any unofficial leak, it’s worth taking the image with a grain of salt. But if it is legitimate, this is what the GoPro Hero6 will look like in its final packaging:

    If the packaging is legitimate, we can see that the Hero6 is waterproof to 10m, takes 12MP photographs, and can shoot video at 4K and 60fps. The current Hero5 maxes out at 4K 30fps, which puts it at a disadvantage when you compare it to cheaper action cameras like the Yi 4K, which shoots 4K 60fps and costs just $340.

    The Hero6 will very likely cost more than this—even the Hero5 still goes for $400—but with more accessories to choose from and a brand name people recognize, it might just convince some Yi fans to return to the mothership.

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    From:: DPreview

    ARRI Rolls Out New Master Grips, Remote Head, Wireless Lighting System and More

    By Daron James

    Check out all of the latest gear from ARRI, just announced at IBC 2017.

    As ARRI approaches its 100th year anniversary, they’ve made a stop at the Amsterdam trade show to release their new offerings for filmmakers. Today, the company released details on several new items. Here’s a breakdown on the new products.

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    From:: No Film School

    TIFF Critic’s Notebook 7: The Nothing Factory, Wavelengths Shorts

    By Vadim Rizov

    The very first thing I saw after arriving at TIFF was Pedro Pinho’s The Nothing Factory: a three-hour film is tough to slot into any festival schedule for practical reasons even before you start factoring in day-wearing-on exhaustion, and seeing it as a stand-alone entry point to the fest seemed like the right move. After some establishing facts of a squat silo being torn down and a factory in action, Pinho cuts to a couple having a sex scene. A phone call letting Ze (José Smith Vargas), the male half, know there’s trouble at the workplace intrudes: capitalism as coitus interruptus. […] → continue…

    From:: Filmmaker Magazine

    Tim Damon’s Hard-Driving Subaru “Spotlight” Video Wins CINDY Gold Award For Designory

    By rpg246

    LOS ANGELES

    Director Tim Damon’s recent “Spotlight” video for agency Designory highlighting the all-new 2018 Subaru WRX and STI high performance models just received a 2017 Gold CINDY award in the “Automotive” commercial category. The Cinema in Industry Awards, which began in 1959, has evolved into the…

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    From:: Shoot OnLine

    Watch: ‘Blue Ruin’, ‘Green Room’ & Jeremy Saulnier’s Art of Suspense

    By Jon Fusco

    The secret to making a great thriller is to get your audience hooked early.

    When it comes to making a great suspense thriller, Jeremy Saulnier stands out as one of today’s most talented filmmakers. His two latest features, Blue Ruin and Green Room carry on a long line of tradition in captivating audiences with fundamental screenwriting and filmmaking skills that keep us both active and engaged.

    In his latest video essay, CinemaWizardBoy breaks down some of the techniques which Saulnier uses most effectively. All of these tactics are combined in a way to keep the audience constantly guessing about what could happen next.

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    From:: No Film School

    Atomos Sumo19M – 4K 19″ high brightness monitor – IBC 2017

    By Elliot Smith

    Atomos have announced the Atomos Sumo19M, a monitor-only version of its Sumo monitor/recorder. The new version keeps the 1200nits brightness and exterior chassis of its sibling, but simply loses the recorder…

    The post Atomos Sumo19M – 4K 19″ high brightness monitor – IBC 2017 appeared first on Newsshooter.

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    From:: News Shooter

    Vufine+ Wearable Display Field Review

    By Graham Sheldon

    Vufine+

    The Vufine+ is a wearable device that sends a 720p image from your HDMI-equipped camera to your sunglasses. Sounds great, but how does it hold up in the field and, more importantly, does it really work? Let’s find out.

    Image: Graham Sheldon, Model: Shewan Edward Howard – Sony a7s w/Sigma 85mm Cine T1.5

    The Vufine+ Wearable Display is the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, and there is much to like in the design. For one, the Vufine+ connects to a magnetic docking unit that is compatible with the supplied non-prescription glasses as well as all the different brands of glasses I have in my house. Simply snap the magnetic docking unit in place on the right side of your favorite pair of glasses and you are in business. For this review I used my trusty Sony a7s and connected a thin 3ft HDMI cable from the camera directly into the Vufine+. The image popped right up into the wearable display without any menu tinkering.

    I expected the ergonomics of having to connect a cable to my glasses to be cumbersome, but I was surprised to find the connected cable wasn’t annoying at all, although I imagine a heavier or cheaper cable would not be the way to go with this setup. My movement didn’t feel inhibited and after shooting handheld for several minutes I even forgot I was tethered. While wireless is clearly the future for this technology, having to work wired is not an insurmountable barrier.

    The 720p image displayed for my right eye provided enough resolution that I was able to easily judge focus with my left eye closed, and the display itself was large enough that I wasn’t distracted by the environment around the image. You’ll want to de-clutter → continue…

    From:: Cinema 5d