All 7 Rob Zombie Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

By Tom Lorenzo

DevilsRejects-Haig

Is there a more controversial figure in modern horror filmmaking than Rob Zombie? Eli Roth may top him, but his output has been so minimal recently that he’s basically taken a backseat to Zombie. His extreme and southern-fried brutality was already a point of contention amongst some, as his critics said that was all he had and was nothing more than a shock director.

Things got much worse when he took on the job of remaking the modern-day horror holy grail that is “Halloween”. Reviled and ripped to shreds immediately upon its release, it burned down any goodwill that Zombie had garnered with people on “The Devil’s Rejects”. Following up so soon with a sequel that was even weirder and more divisive than his first outing, Zombie seemed like he was in a very precarious position within the filmmaking world.

However, he then changed things up a little bit, taking the Ken Russell style he had gone with on “Halloween II” and diving in even harder with “The Lords of Salem”. That seemed like a good way to change things up and a sign that he was looking to broaden his horizon away from redneck knife murders. But then he immediately regressed harshly with “31”, a Kickstarter project that represents all the worst of his instincts.

One can only hope it’s a bump in the road for him as he mounts a project that tests him and broadens his scope. But as he stands now, most of the negative criticism around him is very unfair. He’s one of the strongest and most unique voices in horror filmmaking today, working in a hard R-rated setting that doesn’t get much play anymore. Aside from “31”, his movies don’t deserve the extreme hatred they get. Yes, even the remakes. So let’s take a look → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Watch: SNL Editor Adam Epstein Breaks Down 6 Rules of an ‘Ideal Cut’

By V Renée

Oscar-winner Walter Murch’s set of criteria for a good cut is essential knowledge for any editor.

Have you ever heard about the Rule of Six? It’s a set of editing “rules” created by editor Walter Murch that essentially reveal the Oscar winner’s creative process while in the editing room, and though he would be the first to tell you that following these criteria is more of a personal choice than a requirement, the Rule of Six can be incredibly helpful for those who want to grow in their craft.

If you’ve never heard about Murch’s famous rules, SNL editor Adam Epstein explains them in great detail in his MZed editing course “The Cutting Edge” and luck for us, the Film Riot crew offers this portion of his presentation in the video below. Check it out!

We’ve covered Murch’s Rule of Six here a couple of times, but Epstein, being not only the editor for Documentary Now! but an SNL alum as well offers plenty of excellent insider advice on how to approach each “rule” in your own work.

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From:: No Film School

Pulling Focus: Okja (2017)

By Shane Scott-Travis

“We always have two perspectives when we look at animals. There is one perspective where we look at it in a friendly way or we treat it as family, and there’s one perspective where we treat it as food.”

– Bong Joon-ho

The call to mercy

An affecting, earnest, and exciting tale of interspecies friendship and atrocious truths, Okja judiciously swings from caustic action-adventure to full-on horror film with intelligence, aplomb, and a shit ton of risk-taking.

Deftly directed by South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho (who also co-wrote the movie, alongside Jon Ronson), Okja continues his often audacious mixing of tonalities in a tale that begins as a satire before surfacing as a romping comedy bubbling over with charm and considerable magnetism as we follow a young girl named Mija (ahn Seo-hyun) and her enormous companion animal, the eponymous Okja.

And then Bong pulls the audience along with the looming apprehension that something unspeakable awaits Okja, a beast destined for the catastrophe of the factory farm, the killing floor, to be crushed in the cruel, profit-driven ragwheel of capitalism.

As with Bong’s previous work, most notably Memories of Murder (2003)––which contains explicit slapstick interspersed with grim melodrama––and Snowpiercer (2013)––which integrates bleak futuristic sci-fi spectacle with diverting conceptual folly––resulting in a touching treatise on animal welfare and the bonds of friendship.

“Okja is mind-blowing. Bong does fascinating work. I think he’s gone back a little bit. Taking Snowpiercer and a movie like Mother and The Host and bringing them all together in one movie. I think he’s taken that independent spirit, put it in this massive idea. It’s gorgeous and insane and moving. It’s really this children-adults movie, almost like in the vein of Pan’s Labyrinth, but Bong’s.”

– Jake Gyllenhaal

Meat is murder

A film like Okja, with a cast of A-listers (Paul → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Teradek SERV Pro – wireless video monitoring without the hassle

By Matthew Allard ACS

The Teradek SERV Pro can be used to solve a very common problem. Often I work on documentaries and corporate shoots as a solo shooter or part of a small crew.…

The post Teradek SERV Pro – wireless video monitoring without the hassle appeared first on Newsshooter.

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From:: News Shooter

TIFF Critic’s Notebook 3: Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri and The Killing of a Sacred Deer

By Vadim Rizov

Martin McDonagh and his brother John Michael started making movies about the same time; I’m inclined to give the latter the edge for The Guard, the most uncomplicatedly funny and successful of the films they’ve both made. They’re very much brothers with a shared sensibility grown more matched over the years living together as adults, writing their separate work while watching the same movies movies: a gift for idiomatically spry humor, often in the insult-directed vein, balancing out an attendant tendency to go heavy on Catholic guilt and a fairly simplistic form of moral “complication.” Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri sets […] → continue…

From:: Filmmaker Magazine

Nuovo Zhiyun Tech Crane 2 Gimbal a 3-Assi con Follow Focus e 3.2KG di PlayLoad

By News

La Zhiyun Tech ha annunciato la nuova versione del Gimbal 3-Assi Crane, denominato semplicemente Crane 2, ora integrata una pratica manopola per la messa a fuoco che consente con le fotocamere compatibili ( Nikon Serie D, Canon Serie EOS, Panasonic Lumix, Sony alpha e ILCE ), un controllo della messa a fuoco della lente in tempo reale con una

The post Nuovo Zhiyun Tech Crane 2 Gimbal a 3-Assi con Follow Focus e 3.2KG di PlayLoad appeared first on ProAV News e informazioni Foto, Cine Video .

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From:: Pro AV

The 10 Most Beautiful Movies of the 21st Century

By Shane Scott-Travis

The 21st Century has been and continues to be an astounding and simply stunning time for cinema. There seems to be no end to the awe-inspiring visuals lighting up living rooms, bijous, drive-ins, and multiplexes the world over.

Taste of Cinema’s tireless and exciting search for the most visually exquisite films of 21st Century has been no easy charge, though several films stood out straight away. The assembled list presented here offers up films of dazzling depth, stirring symmetry, impeccable production design, gorgeous framing, and assured grace. Enjoy!

10. Embrace of the Serpent (2015)

Embrace of the Serpent

Man’s connection to nature, the tragic loss of a conquered people, and the mean mysticism that’s carried along with it are at the heart-stirring center of Ciro Guerra’s Heart of Darkness-like adventure odyssey, Embrace the Serpent.

The winner of the Art Cinema Award in the Directors’ Fortnight section at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, this Amazon-set saga of spirituality and enveloping atmosphere is an opulent black-and-white affair that is fittingly plush in 35mm.

This is one of those great and tragic epic jungle films, like Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) or Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979), and like those films it was also made under extremely difficult conditions made palpable by David Gallego’s immersive cinematography.

The Colombian landscapes are as majestic as they are menacing, making the forests a crazy-quilt of textures and ancient radiance. This isn’t just cinema, it’s a feat of luminous and everlasting strength.

9. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

GERMANY BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2014

Gossamer-like, lovely and wistful, Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel thrums with the dual dispositions of the sublime Golden Age director → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

The Ins and Outs of 360 Audio – with Sound Designer Cheryl Ottenritter – ON THE GO – Episode 68

By Fabian Chaundy

In this part of our conversation with Cheryl Ottenritter, we talk about the audio side of the recent explosion in 360 and VR content creation.

360 and VR video have really become buzzwords in recent years. A wide variety of image capturing devices and a multitude of available platforms have resulted in a very fertile environment for immersive content creators to experiment in productions of all types and sizes. This is a revolution that has not only affected the way we shoot video, but also how we capture audio.

Cheryl explains the difference between VR and 360 formats, and the different methods and tools used to approach each type. However, this kind of content creation is just in its infancy. The rules, standards and uses are not defined yet and, as Cheryl puts it, “its a bit of a wild west out there”.

We also talk about audio working on the go, and how the available technology has made it possible for creatives such as editors or indeed mixing engineers to work on the road from a laptop – to the point where being away from the studio or editing suite is no longer an excuse for clients!

This ease of access to powerful technology also brings up the conversation about a saturated market of professionals, and how at a certain point its not about the skills involved in using a certain tool, but more about the person’s own talent. On the other hand, this democratisation causes the infamous “race to the bottom”, where new professionals offer their services at often far too competitive rates, bringing down the standards of the industry as a whole.

We also touch on the issue of the proportion of men to women working in our industry. Cheryl gives us her opinion about the causes, and what she does → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

The Ins and Outs of 360 Audio – with Sound Designer Cheryl Ottenritter – ON THE GO – Episode 68

By Fabian Chaundy

In this part of our conversation with Cheryl Ottenritter, we talk about the audio side of the recent explosion in 360 and VR content creation.

360 and VR video have really become buzzwords in recent years. A wide variety of image capturing devices and a multitude of available platforms have resulted in a very fertile environment for immersive content creators to experiment in productions of all types and sizes. This is a revolution that has not only affected the way we shoot video, but also how we capture audio.

Cheryl explains the difference between VR and 360 formats, and the different methods and tools used to approach each type. However, this kind of content creation is just in its infancy. The rules, standards and uses are not defined yet and, as Cheryl puts it, “its a bit of a wild west out there”.

We also talk about audio working on the go, and how the available technology has made it possible for creatives such as editors or indeed mixing engineers to work on the road from a laptop – to the point where being away from the studio or editing suite is no longer an excuse for clients!

This ease of access to powerful technology also brings up the conversation about a saturated market of professionals, and how at a certain point its not about the skills involved in using a certain tool, but more about the person’s own talent. On the other hand, this democratisation causes the infamous “race to the bottom”, where new professionals offer their services at often far too competitive rates, bringing down the standards of the industry as a whole.

We also touch on the issue of the proportion of men to women working in our industry. Cheryl gives us her opinion about the causes, and what she does → continue…

From:: Cinema 5d

This simple web tool helps you find the lenses you like best

Photo by Brandi Redd

If you’re having trouble deciding what lens to buy next, and diving into the technical details isn’t helping (we have no idea what that’s like… but we hear it happens), a simple web tool called What the Lens might be able to help. Created by photographer Willie Chik, the tool reveals your lens preference by having you pick your favorite photos from a gallery.

The site pulls images from 500px, automatically sorting them by brand—so you can use What the Lens to find your favorite Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Sony FE, Sony A, Olympus, or Panasonic lens. Then, once you’ve selected your brand, you can further break down the gallery by category—selecting either Landscapes, Macro, Animals, Travel, People, and City.

Finally, once you’ve done all that, it’s time to pick your favorite 20 photos. You can scroll down as far as you’d like, loading more shots until you find 20 you really like, and once you’re done the site will reveal what lens suits you best. In my case, after selecting 20 canon portraits, it came up with this:

Of course, we prefer a more technical approach here at DPReview… one that’s not liable to be skewed by your post-processing preference, what kind of landscapes you like best, or the variety of other issues that come up when you really start to think about this tool as a buying guide.

But if you’re looking for a simple and possibly even fun way to determine what lens deserves to go next on your to-buy list, What the Lens might be worth a go. Just be careful with the “People” category… that one can get a bit not safe for work (NSFW).

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From:: DPreview

Why are Sony’s ISO’s different between standard gammas and log?

By alisterchapman

With Sony’s log capable cameras (and most other manufacturers) when you switch between the standard gamma curves and log gamma there is a change in the cameras ISO rating. For example the FS7 is rated at 800 ISO in rec709 but rated at 2000 ISO in log. Why does this change occur and how does it effect the pictures you shoot?

As 709 etc has a limited DR (between around 6 and 10 stops depending on the knee settings) while the sensor itself has a 14 stop range, you only need to take a small part of the sensors full range to produce that smaller range 709 or hypergamma image. That gives the camera manufacturer some freedom to pick the sweetest part of the sensors range. his also gives some leeway as to where you place the base ISO.

I suspect Sony chose 800 ISO for the FS7 and F5 etc as that’s the sensors sweet spot, I certainly don’t think it was an accidental choice.

What is ISO on an electronic camera? ISO is the equivalent sensitivity rating. It isn’t a measure of the cameras actual sensitivity, it is the ISO rating you need to enter into a light meter if you were using an external light meter to get the correct exposure settings. It is the equivalent sensitivity. Remember we can’t change the sensor in these cameras so we can’t actually change the cameras real sensitivity, all we can do is use different amounts of gain or signal amplification to make the pictures brighter or darker.

When you go switch the camera to log you have no choice other than to take everything the sensor offers. It’s a 14 stop sensor and if you want to record 14 stops, then you have to take 100% of the sensors output. The camera manufacturer → continue…

From:: XDCAM-USER