Andy Visits Guillermo del Toro’s Bleak House

By Bryant Frazer

Visit Guillermo del Toro’s horror memorabilia-filled house with Conan’s Andy Richter in this show clip that gets up close and personal with the famed genre director. (Nota bene: he’s a little intense in his devotion to this stuff.)

The post Andy Visits Guillermo del Toro’s Bleak House appeared first on Studio Daily.

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From:: Studio Daily

Video explains Kubrick's use of innovative camera tech when shooting Barry Lyndon

Legendary director Stanley Kubrick was known to be obsessed with cameras and pushing the limits of cinematic technology, with much of his technical awareness stemming from his days as a stills photographer. A new video essay by the British Film Institute now explains his use of different lenses to create the movie Barry Lyndon, which won an Oscar for its cinematography.

We’ve written before about the famous Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm F0.7 lens (originally developed for NASA) that he used, but the BFI essay also discusses how he used it. It also looks at his use of zoom shots and the meanings he hoped to convey with them.

Many scenes in the movie were shot in natural light and very dim candlelight to authentically portray the look and feel of the 18th century. In the very low light conditions Kubrick had to shoot with the superfast F0.7 lens’ aperture fully open, resulting in an extremely shallow depth-of-field. This required re-thinking the way such scenes were staged and demanded reduced actor movement, to avoid mis-focus, but the director felt this helped convey the stilted 18th century atmosphere.

The video essay can be viewed on the British Film Institute’s Facebook page.

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From:: DPreview

LensRentals details its top ten favorite products from the past decade

Ten years have passed since our friends at LensRentals first launched as a small business operating out of a garage. The company has seen many changes over those years, both in its own operation and in the spheres of photography and videography, and it has highlighted some of those changes in a new blog post. The LensRentals team has detailed their top ten favorite products from the last decade.

‘What we’ve found, is that there is no right piece of gear for everyone,’ they say: ;and we all have varying tastes and expectations when it comes to gear.’

Click here to read LensRentals’ ten favorite products from the past decade

The products, which aren’t listed in any particular order, run the gamut from cameras to lenses and a few different accessories. Most notably, Canon products took four of the ten slots, with both the 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III making the list, as well as its EF 400mm F4 DO IS II and 11-24mm F4L lenses.

Pentax, Leica, Freefly, Profoto, Sony, and Sigma products fill out the remaining six slots, though as LensRentals notes: ‘the photography and videography industries have changed faster than ever before, so some pieces of gear had to be left out on our list.’ It’s a somewhat long read, but the LensRentals team takes the time to explain why each product earned it place on the list, and it’s well worth giving it a look.

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From:: DPreview

Astrophotographer Surprised by Huge ‘Fireball’ While Shooting Milky Way

By DL Cade

What’s the biggest surprise you’ve gotten while you were out shooting? For astrophotographer Ian Norman, Wednesday night’s massive ‘fireball’ that streaked across the sky while he was out taking Milky Way pictures tops the list. (Warning: Strong language.)

The ‘fireball’ was actually the re-entry and spectacular burn-up of the Chinese CZ-7 R/B rocket. Of course, at the time, Ian had no idea what it was. He simply flipped his Sony a7S into video mode and started recording the blazing light streaking above the Sierra Nevadas. The footage he captured is pretty incredible… but just imagine being there while this happened.

The ‘incident’ happened in the Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California. Check out the video up top to see it for yourself and hear Ian tell the story.

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From:: Petapixel

Adorable Portraits of Dogs Before and After Their Haircut

By DL Cade

3-Teddy

Here’s a little something that’s bound to put a smile on your face before you head off into the weekend. It’s a new series of dog portraits called Hairy, and they’re some of the most adorable before-and-after shots you’ve ever seen.

The project is the brainchild of pet photographer Grace Chon (previously featured here), and it features portraits of cute pups before and after a trip to the groomer for a haircut.

These disheveled, forlorn, shaggy pups are transformed into stylish and sometimes spritely versions of themselves by the talented folks at Healthy Spot groomers—a transition Chon captures in Hairy.

Yuki, groomed by Alyson Ogimachi
Yuki, groomed by Alyson Ogimachi
Athena, groomed by Donna Owens
Athena, groomed by Donna Owens
Herman, groomed by Cindy Reyes
Herman, groomed by Cindy Reyes
Raider, groomed by Koko Fukaya
Raider, groomed by Koko Fukaya
Rocco, groomed by Patricia Sugihara
Rocco, groomed by Patricia Sugihara
Lana, groomed by Koko Fukaya
Lana, groomed by Koko Fukaya
Biggie Smalls, groomed by Cameron Adkins
Biggie Smalls, groomed by Cameron Adkins
Nala, groomed by Alyson Ogimachi
Nala, groomed by Alyson Ogimachi
<img src="http://petapixel.com/assets/uploads/2016/07/3-Teddy-800×400.jpg" alt="Teddy, groomed by Donna Owens" width="800" continue…

From:: Petapixel

Ricoh releases THETA+ Video app for Android

Ricoh’s Theta series S 360° cameras come with several accompanying apps. While the Theta S app is used for shooting and reviewing 360° images and video, the Theta + and Theta + Video apps were developed for editing images and video respectively. The Theta + Video app for iPhone was released last year, now Ricoh has launched an Android version as well.

Like the iPhone variant, Theta + Video for Android allows you to edit 360° standard and time-lapse videos. Functions include trimming, color adjustment, cropping and the insertion of music tracks. Users can also select from from four types of view formats: Mirror Ball, Little Planet, Equirectangular, and Rectilinear.

As usual, edited videos can be shared to a range of social networks. On Facebook and Youtube they can be viewed in their full 360° glory while on some other platforms cropping is required. Theta + Video for Android is available as a free download from the Google Play Store now.

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From:: DPreview

Don’t Take My Picture: Street Photography and Public Privacy

By Jill Corral

mypicture1

“Hey, don’t take our picture!” a young woman yelled out from her group to me a few days ago. I told her I didn’t take their photo—and it was true, I was just facing them playing Pokémon Go on my phone as many others were also doing in the park that day. But, often I am doing just that.

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” — Robert Capa

As an active street photographer and generally a private person myself, the question of what is a fair subject for my lens is constantly on my mind. And in the age of social media, what is fair or ethical to share to the public.

I’m often asked about this by friends or people who see my work. On Twitter recently, a follower asked me about it, and I was glad for it as it made me put my freeform thoughts about it into words:

mypicture2

Then he asked: Do people ask about seeing the outcome? And I responded: Sometimes, rarely. I will always gladly delete or send it to them if requested. I also would not post if clearly an unwelcome capture.

In the United States, public space photography of pretty much anything is legal. And as far as identifiable faces, there is no need for model releases so long as a photo is not used for commercial ends (such as advertising or stock photography). But none of this is what I’m talking about here.

“I’m known for taking pictures very close, and the older I get, the closer I get.” — Bruce Gilden

Bruce Gilden is a well-known and controversial street photographer whose in-your-face-with-a-flash-bulb signature style produces striking results.

While I find some of his work intriguing, I’ve continue…

From:: Petapixel

AMD Takes a Different Angle on VRAM

By Charles Haine

AMD has a novel approach to increasing VRAM for big VR and 3D renders: an SSD in your GPU.

With the announcement earlier this week by NVIDIA of a video card with 24GB of VRAM, which is targeted specifically at the high end graphics and render market along with live VR stitching, competitor AMD has a high hurdle to jump to stay in the game. Considering many large studios like Framestore run NVIDIA exclusively, AMD needs to not only meet but fly well over the hurdle to make a dent in the pro market. With the new Pro SSG, they just might.

Video Ram is hugely important for video rendering since the processing goes much faster if the image can be buffered in the card’s onboard storage. With the increasingly data-intense footage formats filmmakers are using (8K video, for instance), cards need more on-board memory to load the footage and then process it quickly. For example, some VFX workflows are now up around 50GB per frame, way beyond what even the top end NVIDIA cards can load into memory easily. Since VRAM is generally pretty expensive, making a card with something like 128GB hasn’t yet been cost-effective.

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From:: No Film School

G-Technology Updates Storage Products for High-Res Workflow

By Bryant Frazer

G-Technology has refreshed its line-up of G-Drive, G-RAID and G-Speed products with 8 TB and 10 TB hard drives. The company said the new products will help users keep up with the performance demands of video workflow at 4K and beyond … more

The post G-Technology Updates Storage Products for High-Res Workflow appeared first on Studio Daily.

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From:: Studio Daily