This week SAR readers photos selection

By SonyAlpha Admin

Алексей Борода‎ A Portrait of Ekaterina Selivanova (Sony a7) 1) Submit your picture with a message and picture here: facebook.com/sonyalpharumors or on the SonyAlphaForum image section. 2) Like and comment the pictures from other readers here: facebook.com/sonyalpharumors/photos_stream?tab=photos and on SonyAlphaForum. 3) A selection of most liked pictures by the community and by me SAR admin […]

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From:: Sony Alpha Rumors

Watch: David Fincher is a Secret Mastermind of Visual Effects

By Justin Morrow

A new video essay looks at some of the incredible (and usually invisible) VFX work in David Fincher’s films.

David Fincher may not be widely regarded as a visual effects director, but the fact is, he got his start at ILM in the early ’80s working on Return of the Jedi. Also, The Social Network has more VFX shots than Godzilla (the one from the ’90s, with P. Diddy and Jimmy Page).

In a new video essay, Kristian Williams shows how David Fincher puts his visual effects to work in the service of his narratives, and how this artistry makes him a “master of deception.”

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From:: No Film School

All 8 Movies From The “Star Wars” Franchise Ranked From Worst To best

By Ian Flanagan

Some people watch Star Wars and see the peak cultural touchstone of their young lives. Others see Spaceballs minus the parody. Somewhere in between the casual filmgoer has been exposed in some way to the monstrous film series that is Star Wars, be it an original, prequel, or one of Disney’s new attempts at further box office domination.

While the fanboy population rides the hype train for Episode XIII in the coming seven months, here’s all of the series’ live action films ranked from worst to best from the non-fan perspective.

8. The Phantom Menace

Jar Jar Binks - Star Wars I The Phantom Menace

Likely one of the most miscalculated and excessive efforts ever put to film, the first of the eagerly anticipated Star Wars prequels would end up being the most narratively unimportant to the saga.

The events of The Phantom Menace are trivial, as the rest of the series continues ten years after the story of our false protagonist, Anakin Skywalker,here played by a tiny, insufferable Jake Lloyd. Liam Neeson’s Qui-Gon Jinn has at least twice the time onscreen as Lloyd, but his considerable talents are among the chief to fall to the hand of George Lucas’s profound deficiency at writing dialogue and connecting his stories with internal logic.

The Phantom Menace is a rough starting point for the series’ chronology, and an unpleasant one to have unfold before your eyes. From tarnishing the mythology of the originals, to the firmly established overuse of the false, phony and clean CGI for a vast majority of the film, Lucas’s entire vision is misguided and disjointed.

John Williams’ music is the only consistent saving grace of the prequels – his talent is wasted on the worst of blockbusters here, but throughout these films he is able to elevate → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

All 8 Movies From The “Star Wars” Franchise Ranked From Worst To Best

By Ian Flanagan

Some people watch Star Wars and see the peak cultural touchstone of their young lives. Others see Spaceballs minus the parody. Somewhere in between the casual filmgoer has been exposed in some way to the monstrous film series that is Star Wars, be it an original, prequel, or one of Disney’s new attempts at further box office domination.

While the fanboy population rides the hype train for Episode XIII in the coming seven months, here’s all of the series’ live action films ranked from worst to best from the non-fan perspective.

8. The Phantom Menace

Jar Jar Binks - Star Wars I The Phantom Menace

Likely one of the most miscalculated and excessive efforts ever put to film, the first of the eagerly anticipated Star Wars prequels would end up being the most narratively unimportant to the saga.

The events of The Phantom Menace are trivial, as the rest of the series continues ten years after the story of our false protagonist, Anakin Skywalker,here played by a tiny, insufferable Jake Lloyd. Liam Neeson’s Qui-Gon Jinn has at least twice the time onscreen as Lloyd, but his considerable talents are among the chief to fall to the hand of George Lucas’s profound deficiency at writing dialogue and connecting his stories with internal logic.

The Phantom Menace is a rough starting point for the series’ chronology, and an unpleasant one to have unfold before your eyes. From tarnishing the mythology of the originals, to the firmly established overuse of the false, phony and clean CGI for a vast majority of the film, Lucas’s entire vision is misguided and disjointed.

John Williams’ music is the only consistent saving grace of the prequels – his talent is wasted on the worst of blockbusters here, but throughout these films he is able to elevate → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

‘Loveless’: Andrey Zvyagintsev Reveals How the Anguish of Russia is in All of Us

By Emily Buder

Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s ‘Loveless’ is a bleak window into a vapid society devoid of empathy and meaning.

In 2014, Andrey Zvyagintsev made the definitive contemporary Russian film. At once, the ambitious and harrowing Leviathan is a Biblical tragedy, a classic Russian novel (in the vein of Dostoevsky), and a searing indictment of Russia’s current political situation. In the film, a poor man from a remote fishing village engages in an uphill battle against eminent domain; in the end, he loses much more than his property to the state.

Needless to say, the Russian parliament, which had contributed state funds to the production of Leviathan, publicly denounced the film. That’s why, at the film’s press conference and in a private interview with No Film School, Zvyagintsev and producer Alexander Rodnyansky revealed that they ventured outside the system to fund their next film, Loveless, which just premiered at Cannes.

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From:: No Film School

AOTC with editor of the documentary “KEDI”

By Steve Hullfish

Mo Stoebe currently works as freelance editor of both documentaries and narrative films in Los Angeles. He got his start in the industry as motion designer and animator for commercials and music videos, but his love for film eventually brought him to editing long-form content. He’s completed five documentaries and a feature and loves learning something new about the art of editing every day.

Art of the Cut discusses one of his latest project, the documentary Kedi which has received praise form many fronts. It is currently available on Netflix.

HULLFISH: While there are English subtitles, the language spoken in this documentary is Turkish.

STOEBE: Yes, and my Turkish is very bad.

HULLFISH: I’ve edited in other languages myself, Spanish mostly, and I don’t speak much Spanish. But I feel that you can get a sense of the rhythm of the language. I don’t speak Turkish, but I always felt like the rhythm of the language as you edited it was good.

STOEBE: I am from Austria and grew up bilingual as my mother is originally from the Netherlands so I’ve always been interested in different language. In the case of Kedi, the producers had the forty or so interviews and many verité scenes they had captured fully translated and transcribed. That meant that I was able to see the words that were said transcribed as subtitles as well as their English translations in the frame. I tried to string out interview portions I thought were relevant in this way. Of course there was quite a bit of fine-tuning and adjustment required by Ceyda Torun, who is the director of the film and fluent in Turkish.

HULLFISH: So are you saying the actual video files had translations on them?

STOEBE: Yes we had a small army of people going through all → continue…

From:: Pro Video Coalition

Hail Veydra

By Matthew Jeppsen – DP Notes

Background
When Sony launched their consumer e-mount line of mirrorless DSLRs a few years back, it opened up a wide variety of lens options. The short mount flange distance allows enough space so that it can be adapted to a wide variety of other lens mounts. They have continued to expand this system for affordable video cameras, first with the FS100 and FS700 cameras, and now in the Sony FS7 and FS5 camera lines.

Shooters invested with Canon EF lenses seem to love this system, as affordable adapters from companies like Metabones and MTF make it very easy to use Canon EF lenses on these Sony cameras. I myself own a set of Contax/Zeiss primes that I’ve had converted to Canon EF mounts, and these work beautifully on Sony cameras when paired with an adapter. Vintage lenses like Contax pair well with modern sensors, lending some unique character to the pristine image from modern sensors.

Third Party Mounts
However, there are some annoyances with mount adapters. The biggest problem I’ve run into with adapters is that they often introduce some play or wiggle in the lens. This can be particularly troublesome once you introduce a wireless follow focus that really torques the lens. I’ve even had cheaper adapters (including Metabones) completely fail and seize up on the lens, or the lens release tabs break off. And Canon EF adapters add a significant amount of length to the lens mount, extending the lens forward away from the body of the camera. This can sometimes create a counterweight issue when rigging on a gimbal, and it tends to make handheld setups grow forward.

So with the Sony FS7 and FS5 line now in wide use, there is a growing need for native e-mount lenses. Sony has continued to expand their lens line, and they offer → continue…

From:: Pro Video Coalition

Squeeze Your Quasars With This One Cool Trick

By Matthew Jeppsen – DP Notes

Lighting dimmers. Everyone needs a few in their kit. You can buy ’em pre-made and robust, or you can DIY them if you are handy. There are even mini in-line dimmers for use in practical fixtures (no cord!). But my favorite solution by far is the lowly Harbor Freight Router Speed Control. At just $20 from your local cheap tool supply, this thing is a no-brainer.

For starters, it’s got an on/off switch. This is very handy for lights that have no power switch, like the incredible Source Four leko, or those fancy new Quasar Science LED tubes that the kids are talking about. The other side of the power switch is a variable dimmer setting, which gives you between roughly 20%-100% of dimming control. It’ll handle up to 1000w, is rated for 15 amps, and has a fuse in case you screw up.


The only real downside that I have found is that when dimming it emits a small buzzing noise under high load (when dimming lights over 650 watts or so). I hear a slight buzz when dimming 750w lekos, and it’s a little louder with 1000w heads. The buzz level at 750w is not at all objectionable for sound recording as long as you’re not right on top of the mic with it…to be honest, most rooms are louder than the noise it emits under load.

So pick up a few of these for your kit. And if you buy this weekend, use one of the Harbor Freight discount codes below to save a few bucks.

20% off one item 5/27-5/28 – 88740979
25% off one item 5/29 – 88740589

The post Squeeze Your Quasars With This One Cool Trick appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

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From:: Pro Video Coalition

Here’s How to Make Your Gun Blast Effects Look More Realistic

By V Renée

Find out how to make a gunshot blast effect that looks so real it hurts.

If you’ve got a project you’re working on that includes some gunfire, one of your biggest obstacles is making sure that those gunshots look believable. If using squibs and blanks isn’t really an option for you, you can always try to sell the effect in post, but you’ll want to know a few techniques before you start dropping a bunch of smoke, spark, and blood spatter elements into your timeline.

Axel from HitFilm provides a bunch of great advice on all the things you’ll need to create a realistic gun battle, including gunshot impacts, blasts, and muzzle smoke. Check out the tutorials below!

Getting the VFX right is important for selling the illusion that a real gun battle is going on, but there are also other vital elements to consider. Make sure the lighting and color grade matches throughout all of your elements; ensure that you have good sound effects (gunshots, pops, falls, ricochets, impacts, etc.) that help sell the effect; and, finally, make your touch subtle enough so as to not draw attention to the VFX elements.

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From:: No Film School

All 13 Ang Lee Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

By Panos Kotzathanasis

The most renowned Taiwanese director is considered among the greatest filmmakers of all time, in a rare occasion where an Asian director manages to be so successful in the West and particularly in Hollywood, having won two Oscars for his direction, and countless others from festivals all over the world.

Ang Lee started his studies on the National Arts School, where he graduated in 1975. In 1979, after finishing his military service, he went to study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he completed his bachelor’s degree in theater in 1980. After that, he enrolled at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, where he received his MFA in film production.

In 1982, Lee finished the 16mm short film “Shades of the Lake (1982), which won the Best Drama Award in Short Film in Taiwan, while his thesis work, “Fine Line” (1984), won NYU’s Wasserman Award for Outstanding Direction and was later selected for the Public Broadcasting Service.

In 1990, Lee submitted two screenplays, “Pushing Hands” and “The Wedding Banquet”, to a competition sponsored by Taiwan’s Government Information Office, and they came in first and second, respectively. The winning screenplays brought Lee to the attention of Hsu Li-kong, a recently promoted senior manager in a major studio. Hsu, a first-time producer, invited Lee to direct “Pushing Hands,” a full-length feature that premiered in 1991.

The success of his debut, both among critics and commercially, was a testament to what was about to follow, with Lee continuing to have bigger and bigger success with each film he shot. Here are his 13 films, ranked from worst to best.

13. Hulk (2003)

hulk

Everyone deserves a blunder, and Lee’s came when he took on Marvel’s famous superhero, although the film was a commercial success, grossing over $245 million worldwide.

Bruce → continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Term of the week: Choking

By moviola.com

What happens when the matte in your alpha channel is too big? You choke it. Confused? moviola.com‘s glossary term of the week is here to help.

About moviola.com

moviola.com is a resource dedicated to the art of filmmaking, and only filmmaking. It covers every aspect from pre-production to final delivery. Its Coffee Break Film School focuses on core competencies, while other features like the Glossary of Terms and Compendium provide a visual reference library for understanding specific techniques and industry jargon.

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The post Term of the week: Choking appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

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From:: Pro Video Coalition

How do you know you need a new camera?

Introduction

For the vast majority of shooting I do, even on weddings, I find my aging DSLR is still more than enough camera for the job. After all, it’s the photographer, not the camera, right?
Nikon 35mm F2 D
ISO 200 | 1/1000 sec | F8

‘Do I need a new camera?’

Unsurprisingly, I get that question a lot. I also ask myself that question a lot, especially after working at DPReview for the last eighteen months. My answer has always been ‘no.’

Until now, that is.

You see, I shoot all my personal work on a Nikon D700. Why is that, you might ask? Well, I was handed-me-down a Nikon D80 way back, built up a collection of lenses, and followed the (questionable, these days) full-frame upgrade path. And once I got there, to my used (and abused) D700, I abruptly stopped. What on earth did I need more camera for?

I don’t think I’ll ever get rid of this D700 because a) it’s covered in tape to hold it together, so its ugly and therefore worthless to most resellers, and b) it’s been around the world with me and back again, and hasn’t missed a beat.

It still shoots 5fps, and that’s usually enough for weddings and events. Exposed properly, ISO 6400 is perfectly usable. It’s stood up to everything I’ve thrown at it (and accidentally thrown it at). And, most importantly, I’ve become familiar with all of its ins and outs, and how to work around its limitations. I am able operate it completely by muscle memory and, despite its aging tech, I’ve been confident that if I didn’t get the shot, it wasn’t the camera’s fault – it was mine.

With my flash and exposure → continue…

From:: DPreview

Think Tank TurnStyle V2.0 sling bags for run and gun shooters

By Matthew Allard ACS

The Think Tank TurnStyle v2.0 sling bag is designed to let you carry around lenses, a DSLR or mirrorless camera, or anything else such as audio gear or even spare…

The post Think Tank TurnStyle V2.0 sling bags for run and gun shooters appeared first on Newsshooter.

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From:: News Shooter

Crying Seagull Tears Above the Croisette: Sam Kuhn’s Cannes Diary, Part Six

By Sam Kuhn

Director, screenwriter and boatbuilder (!) Sam Kuhn is in Cannes premiering his short film, Möbius — described as “a moth-eaten tale of magic and mutation half remembered by a teen poet who’s beloved lies lifeless in a stream” — in Critic’s Week. Filmmaker asked Kuhn, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, to keep a diary of his experiences, which rapidly went from jet-lagged to deeply strange. Here is his sixth entry; click here for them all. Day 8 Eight and it’s full circle, which seems fitting as “8” is a basic Möbius-like shape. Woke and walked immediately to the “morning […] → continue…

From:: Filmmaker Magazine

Sony Tidbits…

By SonyAlpha Admin

Gran Canaria w/ FUJINON MK 18-55 T2.9 & Sony FS5 w/ Atomos Inferno from Philip Bloom on Vimeo. Full list of todays Gold Box deals at Amazon, BHphoto, eBay, Amazon.de, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.fr, Amazon.it, Amazon.es. Yeah Field Trip: The Best Photo Convention You’ve Never Heard Of (ALC). Sigma 135mm review at Lenstip. New Sony Gear Lineup! […]

The post Sony Tidbits… appeared first on sonyalpharumors.

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From:: Sony Alpha Rumors

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