CMOS sensor demand is increasing and supply becomes tight

By SonyAlpha Admin

Sony is the world’s number on CMOS sensor producer. And it looks like the market is still booming. Digitimes reports that supply is becoming tight. Image Sensor World sums up the reasons for that: Handsets with dual-lens cameras spurs demand for CMOS sensors More mid-range smartphones are expected to feature a dual lens cameras in […]

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From:: Sony Alpha Rumors

Sony Tidbits…

By SonyAlpha Admin

Sony A6500 Review | John Sison Full list of todays Gold Box deals at Amazon, BHphoto, eBay, Amazon.de, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.fr, Amazon.it, Amazon.es. Sony a99 II real-world sample gallery (Dpreview). New ShutterBands Enhancement Kit for Sony E-Mount Cameras at Amazon US. Really Right Stuff Now Available at B&H (Explora). Cumberland Wildpark with the Sony A7II VLOG […]

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From:: Sony Alpha Rumors

The 10 Most Exciting Directors Working in Hollywood Today

By Ryan Jamison

We may say “they don’t make ‘em like they used to!” but the state of American cinema really hasn’t diminished so much as film distribution has faltered. Plenty of contemporary directors continue to deliver high-quality films, breathing new life into a medium that has yet to stop thriving.

There will always be room for discussion of the Kubricks and the Scorseses, but this list is focusing on directors who have not peaked any earlier than the nineties, and whose best work may very well still be ahead of them. Their contributions are always fresh and exciting even when they don’t reach masterpiece status, and they each could indeed birth a future classic at any moment in the coming years – in fact, some of them already have.

10. Jeff Nichols

Unlike the following nine filmmakers on this list, Jeff Nichols is a director whose style is not easily identified as uniquely his own. That isn’t necessarily a negative, however, because it’s his versatility that makes him shine. While his approach to stories remains pretty restrained throughout his work, the stories themselves are so different from one another that even the genre of his next output is totally unpredictable.

Just last year, he released two films with almost nothing in common aside from a couple of returning cast members. First was Midnight Special, an almost 80s-esque sci-fi thriller with a heart. It was a refreshingly original father-son tale that flew somewhat under the radar, while his second 2016 effort, Loving, has garnered awards recognition as a performance-driven historical drama.

Despite striking no resemblance in the content of their plots, both of these films are quietly effective and surprisingly similar in the softness of their tone. His three prior films were impressive as well, with Take Shelter being his most continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Pulling Focus: Safe (1995)

By Shane Scott-Travis

Safe

Being and time

The oft antagonistic American indie filmmaker Todd Haynes first forced my attention with his 1995 revisionist art house horror film Safe, and I’ve been a supporter of his ever since. His sophomore film (following his impressive debut from 1991, Poison, and a string of exceptional short films), Safe is a masterpiece of existential catastrophe and coolly detached uncertainty that also serves as one of the best American films of the nineties.

Safe stars the luminous Julianne Moore, in her first starring role, as Carol White, a So Cal housewife in the year 1987. Carol leads a humdrum life in a sober suburban façade that slowly starts to languish around her in an eerie and oblique manner that reaps maximum effect from the illusory manipulation of sound and image. She has lifeless sex with her addled husband (Xander Berkeley). She shops, and gossips, and has hair appointments, and her comfortable existence crashes down bit by bit.

“You don’t always notice it, but during a lot of the scenes in Safe there’s a low-level hum on the soundtrack. This is not an audio flaw but a subtle effect: It suggests that malevolent machinery of some sort is always at work somewhere nearby. Air conditioning, perhaps, or electrical motors, or idling engines, sending gases and waste products into the air. The effect is to make the movie’s environment quietly menacing.”

– Roger Ebert

The anxiety in the antiseptic routines of Carol’s day-to-day life, her disconnect with her family, her inability to function, therein lies the horror that Haynes’ film luxuriates in. This is not the horror of monsters run amok but of ennui, alienation, and psychosomatic worry.

Carol, increasingly frazzled over commonplace occurrence, such as the delivery of new furniture to her Stepford-esque abode, wigs out with the non-specific illness known continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Zylight Announces Sale on LED Fresnels, Soft Lights with White Finishes

By Staff

Zylight today announced its ‘Winter White Sale,’ which offers reduced prices on versions of its F8-100 LED Fresnel and IS3 large panel light in white finishes through Feb. 28, 2017. Designed for special architectural and staging applications, the lights blend into light ceilings better than black fixtures, or can be used to stand out from dark […]

The post Zylight Announces Sale on LED Fresnels, Soft Lights with White Finishes appeared first on Below the Line.

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From:: BLT News

4 Reasons Why “Double Indemnity” Is The Best Film Noir Ever

By David Zou

“Office memorandum, Walter Neff to Barton Keyes, Claims Manager. Los Angeles, July 16th, 1938. Dear Keyes: I suppose you’ll call this a confession when you hear it. I don’t like the word confession. I just want to set you right about one thing you couldn’t see, because it was smack up against your nose.”

“You think you’re such a hot potato as a claims manager, such a wolf on a phoney claim. Well, maybe you are, Keyes, but let’s take a look at this Dietrichson claim, Accident and Double Indemnity. You were pretty good in there for a while, all right. You said it wasn’t an accident. Check. You said it wasn’t suicide. Check. You said it was murder. Check and double check. You thought you had it cold, all wrapped up in tissue paper, with pink ribbons around it. It was perfect, except that it wasn’t, because you made a mistake, just one tiny little mistake. When it came to picking the killer, you picked the wrong guy, if you know what I mean. Want to know who killed Dietrichson?”

“Hold tight to that cheap cigar of yours, Keyes. I killed Dietrichson. Me, Walter Neff, insurance agent, 35 years old, unmarried, no visible scars. Until a little while ago, that is. Yes, I killed him. I killed him for money, and a woman, and I didn’t get the money and I didn’t get the woman. Pretty, isn’t it?”

– Walter Neff in “Double Indemnity”

Most critics declare Film Noir as a Hollywood sub-genre that had its golden age during the period ranging from the end of the 1930s to the 1950s. So, the natural question is: Why is a film produced in 1944 the sub-genre’s epitome when before that many supposedly noir films had been produced? There are two answers to this question. continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

Cinema Audio Society Announces Nominations for 2016 Outstanding Product Awards

By Staff

The Cinema Audio Society announced the nominees for the CAS Outstanding Product Awards for Production and Post-Production. “There were many innovative and outstanding choices in both production and post-production work flows,” said Bob Bronow, chair of the CAS Awards Committee. “Our Blue Ribbon panel was challenged to whittle the list of products down to only […]

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From:: BLT News

Thelma Schoonmaker and Janet Ashikaga to Receive Career Achievement Honors at the 2017 ACE Eddie Awards

By Staff

American Cinema Editors (ACE) will present veteran editors Janet Ashikaga, ACE and Thelma Schoonmaker, ACE with the organization’s prestigious Career Achievement honors at the 67thAnnual ACE Eddie Awards on Friday, January 27, 2017 in the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The Career Achievement Award honors veteran editors whose body of work and reputation […]

The post Thelma Schoonmaker and Janet Ashikaga to Receive Career Achievement Honors at the 2017 ACE Eddie Awards appeared first on Below the Line.

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From:: BLT News

Zylight’s Winter White sale

By Jose Antunes

The just announced Winter White Sale from Zylight offers reduced prices on versions of its F8-100 LED Fresnel and IS3c large panel light in white finishes until the end of February 2017. Designed for special architectural and staging applications, the white lights from Zylight blend into light ceilings better than black fixtures, or can be

The post Zylight’s Winter White sale appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

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From:: Pro Video Coalition

Pulling Focus: The Conversation (1974)

By Shane Scott-Travis

The Conversation (1974)

“There’s a strong case to be made for The Conversation being Coppola’s greatest film.”

– Film4

Paranoia, the destroyer

A bright, unclouded afternoon in San Francisco as a busy plaza teems with people in a sharply impressive telephoto shot as outlying music coalesces with electronic intonations. Tracking a circus mime through the bustling crowd before finding one Harry Caul (Gene Hackman), dressed in a plastic raincoat, and wearing a rather unemphatic hearing device, this tenuously nondescript man is the standard-bearer of Francis Ford Coppola’s analytical, Kafkaesque classic from 1974, The Conversation.

This opening shot, once the film starts to congregate into sharp focus, is as exact, revealing and concentrated as the screenplay, also written by Coppola, which he considers to be the most personal project of his career.

Made amidst an unprecedented swell of creativity, Coppola emerged between the exalted occurrence of Godfather I (1972) and Godfather II (1974), and while those paired epics are nothing to flout, The Conversation, on such a smaller scale, is still every bit as exciting. In fact, one could well argue that The Conversation rivals the Godfather films as far as being a pisstake on the moral disintigration of America.

Emblematic of a very 1970s filament of political paranoid cinema, The Conversation made it crystal clear that to observe the world was, unfailingly, to be paranoid.

“The Conversation is such a fantastic idea: being able to hear the same conversation six or seven times, and each time it takes on a slightly different meaning. It’s sort of like Blow Up where you see a photograph at different times and read all kinds of different things into it as the picture goes on.”

– Brian De Palma

Said discreetly, heard everywhere

As professional audio surveillance expert Harry Caul, Gene Hackman delivers an exceptionally withdrawn and vigorously internalized performance. Caul continue…

From:: Taste Of Cinema

This Simple Video is the Perfect CMYK Demo: See Subtractive Color in Action

By DL Cade

CMYK—which stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Key (or Black)—is the color model used in most printing. It’s called a subtractive color model, and if you don’t understand what that means or how it works, this brilliant little demo should help.

The video was posted by the Instagram account @physicsfun, and it shows how each subsequent color after the Key below subtracts brightness from the background to create a final color image. In CMYK, all the colors together overlap to create black, compared to the additive RGB model where white is the result of combining Red, Green, and Blue.

All @physicsfun had to do was stack four CMYK coasters on on top of the other, and Vermeer’s painting “Girl with a Pearl Earring” emerges. Check out the video below:

A video posted by physicsfun (@physicsfun) on Jan 13, 2017 at 8:40am PST

(via Retouchist)

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From:: Petapixel

Zylight Announces ‘Winter White’ Sale on LED Fresnels, Soft Lights with White Finishes

By Cinescopophilia

Zylight Announces ‘Winter White’ Sale on LED Fresnels, Soft Lights with White Finishes LOS ANGELES – Jan. 17, 2017 – Zylight, a leading manufacturer and distributor of innovative LED lighting solutions, today announced its Winter White Sale, which offers reduced prices on versions of its F8-100 LED Fresnel and IS3c large panel light in white finishes through Feb. 28, 2017. Designed […] continue…

From:: Cinescopophilia

Watch Popcorn Explode at 30,000fps Super Slow Motion

By DL Cade

It’s a well-known “fact of the Internet” that almost anything will look cool if you shoot it in super slow motion—the “Slow Mo Guys” have made quite a YouTube career out of it. But even if you’re getting sick of the trend, watching popcorn pop at 30,000 fps will probably still delight.

This video was not put together by the Slow Mo Guys. It was shot by the YouTube channel Warped Perception, using a Phantom v2512: the “World’s Fastest Digital Ultrahigh-Speed Camera” according to its maker. The first bit, filmed at a more reasonable 1,300 fps but higher resolution, was shot with the Phantom Flex 4K.

So go ahead: watch popcorn pop. The video below maxes out at 15,000 fps, while the one up top takes you all the way to 30,000fps, where you can literally watch the kernel writhe right before it bursts a delicious seam.

(via Sploid)

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From:: Petapixel

A Lens Test Of The Canon 18-80 T4.4 CN-E from LensProToGo

By Cinescopophilia

LensProToGo go through a few test on the new Canon 18-80 T4.4 CN-E. First Checking the accuracy of Parfocal, then Flaring the lens, Checking breathing will rack focusing, taking a look at the bokeh and lastly seeing edge distortion and sharpness. For more please see LenProToGo: https://www.lensprotogo.com/rent/prod… continue…

From:: Cinescopophilia

Paralinx Tomahawk2, Libec TH-X and Hands-Free Monopod

By Cinescopophilia

UK’s Visual Impact take a quick look back at some of the fresh gear news from last week. Here’s everything that happened in our industry over the past week… in 90 seconds! Paralinx Tomahawk 2: http://www.visuals.co.uk/visualsblog/… Libec TH-X Tripod: http://www.visuals.co.uk/5316509-thx…. Libec HFMP Kit: http://www.visuals.co.uk/5316508-hfmp… continue…

From:: Cinescopophilia